Chemical Injectors

Spotlight Name Archive: 
New Product Showcase
Legacy ID: 
56780
Spotlight Header Archive: 
April 2009

The new D14–14 GPM series of chemical injectors are powered by water flow, reducing energy costs. They accurately and continuously inject chemicals at the point of application. Variations in water flow or pressure do not affect operation, offering consistent, repeatable results. Their precise ratio adjuster allows for minute adjustments, enabling the user to control chemical costs.

Activated Carbon

Activated carbon is an excellent adsorbent due to its large surface area and the fact that the diverse surfaces can take on many different types of contaminants.

Deck: 

Broad spectrum removal filter media—overview

About The Author: 

About the Author
Rick Ciminello is president of CEI - Carbon Enterprises Inc., Circleville, Ohio. He can be reached at 800.344.5770, or by e-mail at rick@ceifiltration.com.

Activation Date: 
June 5, 2005
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16158

Preserving Pipelines

Well-maintained and functional sewer systems are a major asset in any community, but they require regular cleaning, inspection and maintenance. Chemical grouting too often is viewed as a stopgap measure to reduce groundwater infiltration. In reality, grouting does much more to maintain sewer line integrity. It also is a soil-sealing process that stabilizes the sewer bedding soil, preventing washout of bedding fines and resulting pipe misalignment and joint failure.

Deck: 

Chemical Grouting Is a Key Component of Sewer System Maintenance

About The Author: 

Richard "Dick" N. Schantz, P.E., is vice president of operations and a principal with Aries Industries, Sussex, Wis. You can reach him at 800-234-7205 or e-mail dick.schantz@ariesind.com.

Activation Date: 
November 22, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13456

Preserving Pipelines

Chemical grouting too often is viewed as a stopgap measure to reduce groundwater infiltration. In reality, grouting does much more to maintain sewer line integrity. It also is a soil-sealing process that stabilizes the sewer bedding soil, preventing washout of bedding fines and resulting pipe misalignment and joint failure.

Deck: 

Chemical Grouting Is a Key Component of Sewer System Maintenance

About The Author: 

Richard "Dick" N. Schantz, P.E., is vice president of operations and a principal with Aries Industries, Sussex, Wis. You can reach him at 800-234-7205 or e-mail dick.schantz@ariesind.com.

Activation Date: 
November 13, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13429

Wet Chemical TOC Analysis

The goal of this article is to demonstrate that the Shimadzu TOC-VW can effectively oxidize the Humic Acid (HA) matrix at high accuracy and precision levels never before witnessed by the wet chemical TOC community. The Shimadzu TOC-VW Carbon analyzer is the only TOC on the market that uses three oxidation techniques of UV light, heat, and persulfate in a single analyzer.1

Deck: 

Humic Acid: A Complex Molecule, A Simple Solution

Activation Date: 
October 8, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13374

Louisiana Meets New Security Requirements with Quick Test to Monitor Chemical Profile at Plants, Water Sources

As part of its Safe Drinking Water Program, the State of Louisiana recently implemented 12 units of the Severn Trent Services Eclox(tm) Rapid Response Water Testing System. Eclox offers municipalities a low cost option for monitoring water quality and meeting new security requirements.

Deck: 

Products In Action

Activation Date: 
October 8, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13372

Shifts in Analytical Requirements

To remain successful, the water treatment professional should take advantage of advances in in-field testing as well as advances in laboratory analyses. This article describes the shifts in analytical requirements recommended to satisfy consumer desires and promote expansion of the POU/POE water treatment industry.

Deck: 

In-field testing and analysis become responsibility of dealers

About The Author: 

Troy Ethan is the president of Spectrum Laboratories in Minneapolis.

Publication Date: 
August 27, 2002
Activation Date: 
August 27, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13317

Back to the Basics, Part 1

Basic water chemistry, terminology and applications can be very complicated and not seem so basic to individuals without a chemistry background. This series of articles will help shed light on the chemistry of water and the mysteries that it can contain, plus explain the technologies used to treat water so the purchaser can make an educated attempt to find the right solution for a particular application. There are no cut-and-dry formulas for water treatment and certainly no cure-all for every application or problem, but with an understanding of how water works and the technologies developed to treat water, a person can utilize his resources to come up with solutions for his particular need or application.

Deck: 

Brushing Up on Water Chemistry 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario, Canada.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13083

Advanced Technology Brings the Power to Chlorine Dioxide

Chlorine dioxide is an extremely effective and powerful biocide that has been used for many years as a bleaching agent and slimicide in the pulp and paper industry, as a disinfectant in municipal water treatment and in many other industrial water treatment operations. However, significant capital and operating costs have limited the use of chlorine dioxide to large-scale applications. New technology now makes it practical to use the biocide in a wider range of water treatment applications.

About The Author: 

Michael Cochran is the business development manager for the Aseptrol technology at Engelhard Corp., a material science and surface chemistry company based in Iselin, N.J.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13070

Practical Engineering Combined with Sound Operations Optimizes Phosphorus Removal

Built in the early 1970s, The Oakland, Maine, Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) treats and discharges approximately 300,000 gallons per day (gpd) of wastewater to the Messalonskee Stream. The facility was designed as a conventional activated sludge secondary treatment system to be used principally for BOD and TSS removals. The secondary effluent enters the Messalonskee Stream upstream of several impoundments. This practice has resulted in a steady decline in the water quality of the stream as evidenced by increased algae blooms and other signs of euthophication in impoundments located downstream of the discharge.

About The Author: 

James Fitch, P.E., is a vice president with Woodard & Curran, Portland, Maine, with special expertise in municipal facilities. Daniel Bolduc is superintendent of the Oakland, Maine, Wastewater Treatment Facility.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13039
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