AWWA: SDWA Anniversary Cause to Celebrate, 'Renew Our Commitment' to Safe Water

Source: 
American Water Works Assn.
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AWWA CEO David LaFrance thanks water professionals nationwide for keeping water safe for drinking

Dec. 16, 2014, marked the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which today includes regulations for more than 90 contaminants. American Water Works Assn. (AWWA) CEO David LaFrance issued the following statement to mark the occasion.

Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
December 18, 2014

A Shiny Example

Brand protection and the production of clean, shiny cans are important in the canning industry. Can corrosion not only negatively impacts a company’s image, but it also can impact the safety of the packaged food. Corrosive cans may cause microleakages, which increase the risk of reinfection after sterilization.

The water used for sterilization must be properly treated so that there is no risk of deposits and corrosion on cans. The chemical products also should protect the sterilizer equipment and cooling system against deposition and corrosion to reduce maintenance.

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Food company improves can quality with corrosion inhibitors

About The Author: 

Peter Scheidel is senior product applications specialist for GE Water & Process Technologies Deutschland GmbH. Scheidel can be reached at peter.scheidel@ge.com or +49.6223.72076.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
Issue Reference: 

Making the Most of Moss

Sphagnum moss is a natural bog plant that decays and forms peat. It has been used in the horticulture industry for years, and has a long folk history for its ability to purify water, heal wounds and preserve food. Today you can add “preventative measure for cooling tower scale and corrosion” to the growing list of its many attributes as a viable, all-natural water treatment alternative.

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Combating cooling tower corrosion and scale with moss treatment

About The Author: 

Dr. David R. Knighton is president and CEO of Creative Water Solutions LLC. Knighton can be reached at kelmart@aol.com or 763.398.0141. Vance Fiegel is chief scientific office for Creative Water Solutions LLC. Fiegel can be reached at 763.398.0141.

Publication Date: 
September 10, 2012
Activation Date: 
September 10, 2012
Issue Reference: 

Industrial Fouling

Look at the heating element of a washing machine or dishwasher in a hard water area and you will see a white encrustation containing hardness salts. This commonly is referred to as limescale and is an example of domestic fouling.
Industrial fouling poses a far greater problem than anything in the domestic sector. Huge volumes of fouled fluids are handled, and the systems that contain the fluids can become fouled as well. The quality of water streams used by industry varies widely and gives rise to numerous fouling problems.

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Controlling Scale Deposition

About The Author: 

Jan de Baat Doelman is president of Scalewatcher NorthAmerica, Inc. Scalewatcher North America, Inc.'s research of electronic systems in the United States, Europe and Asia has led to the implementation of an effective scale deposit-control strategy. The patented Scalewatcher Electronic ScaleControl System, originally launched in 1989, provides a nonintrusive, chemical maintenance-free method of removing limescale from pipes and equipment.

Activation Date: 
October 29, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13404

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 3

Based on the City of Hollywood’s experience, the use of 316L stainless steel should be evaluated carefully due to the potential for problems in the erection and construction of water treatment facilities that will be in contact with high chloride water and/or other corrosive chemistries. As with many membrane facilities, much of the stainless steel is exposed (not buried), which subjected it to atmospheric as well as water quality problems. Therefore, unless the quality control of the raw and reject water (chemical, physical and microbial) can be assured, 316L stainless steel may not be the appropriate material for engineers to specify.

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Materials Selection

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax 954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net
Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.
Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com.
Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com.
Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com.

Activation Date: 
July 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13198

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 2

Aerobic bacteria (Crenothrix, Gallionella) primarily are encountered in the fresh surface waters, although anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and facultative strains also are encountered. Ground waters are more likely to contain anaerobic and facultative bacteria, as well as Gallionella than surface waters.3 Sulfate-reducing bacteria also are found in seawater.3

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax
954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net.

Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.

Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com

Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com

Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax: 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com

Activation Date: 
June 5, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13137

Sulphur Water Solution

For more than 220 years people have journeyed to White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., to indulge themselves in baths of mineral water flowing from mountain springs. As inviting as the sulphur water may be, it is equally harsh on the pipes and pumps that transport it. Eight years ago Greenbrier decided to stop the corrosion once and for all by installing an all-stainless model manufactured by Goulds Pumps.

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Stainless steel’s anticorrosive properties help serve up the healing powers of water

About The Author: 

Goulds Pumps, located in Seneca Falls, N.Y., is a manufacturer of pumps for the industrial sector and water technologies market, producing a line of residential water well pumps. The Goulds Pumps' product portfolio includes submersible and lineshaft turbine, 4-inch submersible, jet, sump, effluent, sewage and centrifugal, as well as double suction, multistage, slurry and process pumps.

Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13130

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 1

Metals such as bronze, copper and iron have been used for thousands of years by man for both peaceful and non-peaceful purposes. One of the most useful purposes for metal is the production of steel.

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax 954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net.

Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.

Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com.

Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com.

Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com.

Activation Date: 
May 6, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13090

Novel Approach to Pipeline Weighting Reduces Buoyancy, Cost and Materials

Clearly, the pipeline construction industry has identified benefits of the filled membrane over traditional concrete weights.

About The Author: 

James C. McGill is a consultant with CRC-Evans Pipeline International, Inc. He has been involved in pipeline buoyancy control since 1983, is a registered professional engineer, is a named inventor on 26 patents including a method of concrete coating plastic pipe, and is a member of the Engineering Hall of Fame at the University of Tulsa.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13038

Products At Work - Non-Metallic Enclosures Solve Corrosion Problem in Brewery

Non-Metallic Enclosures Solve Corrosion Problem in Brewery

Activation Date: 
March 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12994