A Shiny Example

Brand protection and the production of clean, shiny cans are important in the canning industry. Can corrosion not only negatively impacts a company’s image, but it also can impact the safety of the packaged food. Corrosive cans may cause microleakages, which increase the risk of reinfection after sterilization.

The water used for sterilization must be properly treated so that there is no risk of deposits and corrosion on cans. The chemical products also should protect the sterilizer equipment and cooling system against deposition and corrosion to reduce maintenance.

Deck: 

Food company improves can quality with corrosion inhibitors

About The Author: 

Peter Scheidel is senior product applications specialist for GE Water & Process Technologies Deutschland GmbH. Scheidel can be reached at peter.scheidel@ge.com or +49.6223.72076.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
Issue Reference: 

Pro Products, LLC

Pro Products, LLC is a manufacturing, marketing and sales organization focused on the water treatment and irrigation dealer and distributor market. In addition, Pro serves the plumbing wholesale and municipal water treatment market. Pro offers a complete line of water treatment chemicals, equipment sanitizers, test kits, sales demonstration kits, soaps and other lead generation products. Pro also provides rust cleaners and preventers for irrigation systems and organic based fertilizers and pest repellents

Address

7201 Engle Road
Fort Wayne, IN 46804
United States
Phone: 800-285-9176
Fax: 260-490-9431

Product Categories

General Magnaplate

General Magnaplate provided synergistic surface enhancement coatings for metal parts. Our coatings prevent wear and corrosion, improve surface lubricity, resist environmental and chemical corrosion and have permanent dry-lubrication properties. Other properties include superior mold release, low coefficient of friction, dieletric strength and won't chip, peel or flake off. Many coatings are USDA/FDA/Agri-Canada compliant.

Address

1331 U.S. Route 1
Linden, NJ 07036
USA
Phone: 908-862-6200
Fax: 908-862-6110

Product Categories

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 3

Based on the City of Hollywood’s experience, the use of 316L stainless steel should be evaluated carefully due to the potential for problems in the erection and construction of water treatment facilities that will be in contact with high chloride water and/or other corrosive chemistries. As with many membrane facilities, much of the stainless steel is exposed (not buried), which subjected it to atmospheric as well as water quality problems. Therefore, unless the quality control of the raw and reject water (chemical, physical and microbial) can be assured, 316L stainless steel may not be the appropriate material for engineers to specify.

Deck: 

Materials Selection

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax 954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net
Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.
Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com.
Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com.
Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com.

Activation Date: 
July 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13198

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 2

Aerobic bacteria (Crenothrix, Gallionella) primarily are encountered in the fresh surface waters, although anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and facultative strains also are encountered. Ground waters are more likely to contain anaerobic and facultative bacteria, as well as Gallionella than surface waters.3 Sulfate-reducing bacteria also are found in seawater.3

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax
954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net.

Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.

Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com

Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com

Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax: 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com

Activation Date: 
June 5, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13137

Revisiting the Selection of Stainless Steel in Water and Wastewater Treatment Environments: Part 1

Metals such as bronze, copper and iron have been used for thousands of years by man for both peaceful and non-peaceful purposes. One of the most useful purposes for metal is the production of steel.

About The Author: 

Frederick Bloetscher, Ph.D., P.E., is with Public Utility Management and Planning Services, Inc., Hollywood, Fla. Phone 954-925-3492; Fax 954-925-2692; e-mail h2o_man@bellsouth.net.

Richard J. Bullock is with Weir Materials and Foundries, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Phone 904-285-8039; Fax 904-285-8043; e-mail r.j.bullock@att.net.

Robert E. Fergen, P.E., is with Hazen and Sawyer, P.C., Raleigh, N.C. Phone 919-833-7152; Fax 919-833-1828; e-mail refergen@hazenandsawyer.com.

Gerhardt M. Witt, P.G., is with Gerhardt M. Witt & Associates, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. Phone 561-642-9923; Fax 561-642-3327; e-mail wittassoc@aol.com.

Gary D. Fries, P.E., is with Boyle Engineering Corporation, Orlando, Fla. Phone 407-425-1100; Fax 407-422-3866; e-mail gfries@boyleengineering.com.

Activation Date: 
May 6, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13090