'Super Detector' Tracks Toxic Algae

Source: 
Lund University
Deck: 

A Ph.D. student's research may save lives

A "super detector" that can track the traces of a lump of sugar in the Baltic Sea was the starting point for a potentially life-saving technique developed at Lund University in Sweden. The method detects toxic algae blooms in drinking water.

A biosensor recently developed at Lund University can detect substances at 10,000 times lower concentrations than what is currently possible. PhD student Lesedi Lebogang found a practical application that could be particularly helpful in warm climates such as Africa, Australia and the southern U.S.

Publication Date: 
October 23, 2014

Ore Knob Mine Community Meets With EPA to Address Drinking Water Cleanup

Source: 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Deck: 

EPA meets with residents to find non-time critical cleanup alternatives for drinking water

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a public meeting to inform the public of the draft Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for the non-time critical cleanup alternatives for drinking water impacted by the Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site in Laurel Springs, Ashe County, N.C.

The meeting’s outcome will help EPA choose the best alternative to ensure residents living in the vicinity of the historical mining operations and flooded underground mine workings are protected from releases to groundwater at the Ore Knob Mine Site.

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Publication Date: 
October 17, 2014

Emerging Contaminants in Water Cause Health Concerns

Source: 
NSF Intl.
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NSF Intl. survey findings reinforce the need for water quality standard

A vast majority (82%) of consumers report they are concerned about trace levels of emerging contaminants in drinking water, such as pesticides and herbicides (87%), prescription drugs (34%) and detergents (24%), according to a new survey from NSF Intl.

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Publication Date: 
October 15, 2014

Hospital Water Taps Contaminated With Bacteria

Source: 
Bluewater
Deck: 

Research finds higher levels of infectious pathogens in water from faucet taps with aerators

New research has found significantly higher levels of infectious pathogens in water from faucet taps with aerators compared to water from deeper in the plumbing system, which Sweden's Bluewater believes underlines the need for additional research to discover how water contamination threatens patient health.

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Publication Date: 
September 16, 2014

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Provides Funding to Target Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie

Source: 
U.S. EPA
Deck: 

The nearly $12 million in funding will be made available to Ohio, Michigan and Indiana agencies, as well as some federal organizations

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy announced that the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) will provide almost $12 million to federal and state agencies to protect public health by targeting harmful algal blooms (HABs) in western Lake Erie. The funding builds upon GLRI’s ongoing efforts to reduce algal blooms and will be made available to Ohio, Michigan and Indiana state agencies and to the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Publication Date: 
September 4, 2014

NSF Develops Standard to Address Pharmaceuticals, Other Contaminants in Drinking Water

Source: 
NSF Intl.
Deck: 

NSF/ANSI 401: Drinking Water Treatment Units - Emerging Compounds/Incidental Contaminants addresses the ability of a water treatment device to remove up to 15 contaminants from drinking water

NSF Intl. has developed the first American National Standard that validates the effectiveness of water treatment devices that are designed to reduce trace levels of emerging contaminants in drinking water. The standard, named NSF/ANSI 401: Drinking Water Treatment Units - Emerging Compounds/Incidental Contaminants, addresses the ability of a water treatment device to remove up to 15 contaminants from drinking water. Types of contaminants include some pharmaceuticals, over-the-counter medications, herbicides, pesticides and chemicals used in manufacturing, such as bisphenol A (BPA).

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Publication Date: 
August 29, 2014
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NSF Develops Standard to Address Pharmaceuticals, Other Contaminants in Drinking Water

Securing Water Safety

Protecting the quality and safety of our nation’s drinking water is an important and never-ending task. NSF Intl., a global independent public health organization, works with government, industry and consumer groups to make sure harmful contaminants and chemicals are not added to drinking water.

Deck: 

New standards ensure protection against tampering & emerging contaminants

About The Author: 

Dave Purkiss is general manager of NSF Intl.’s Municipal Water Products Program. Purkiss can be reached at purkiss@nsf.org or 734.827.6855.

Publication Date: 
August 26, 2014
Activation Date: 
August 26, 2014
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New AWWA Book Examines Water Contamination Outbreaks

Source: 
American Water Works Assn.
Deck: 

“Ensuring Safe Drinking Water” offers 21 case studies and in-depth analysis

The American Water Works Assn. (AWWA) released its newest publication, Ensuring Safe Drinking Water: Learning From Frontline Experience With Contamination by Steve E. Hrudey and Elizabeth J. Hrudey.

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Publication Date: 
August 18, 2014

WQA to Host Microcystin Contamination Open Forum

Source: 
Water Quality Assn.
Deck: 

The forum is a response to the microcystin contamination in Toledo, Ohio

In response to the microcystin contamination in Toledo, Ohio, the Water Quality Assn. (WQA) Water Sciences Committee is hosting an online meeting/conference call to share information and have a technical discussion regarding this event.

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Publication Date: 
August 13, 2014

USGS Begins Drilling ‘Sentinel’ Wells in New Mexico

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Deck: 

New wells will provide early alerts for groundwater contamination

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began drilling “sentinel” wells at the first of three locations in the Trumbull Village neighborhood in Albuquerque, N.M., to provide early alerts for groundwater contamination.

These new sentinel wells will provide early warning if there is a northeastward movement of the Kirtland Air Force Base Bulk Fuels Facility plume, and would provide Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA) and Air Force officials lead time to implement plans to protect nearby groundwater drinking water supply wells.

Publication Date: 
August 13, 2014
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USGS Begins Drilling ‘Sentinel’ Wells in New Mexico