Small System, Big Benefits

The town of Newport Center, Vt., is a small community of approximately 1,500 residents located just south of the U.S.-Canada border. A combination of drought and increased water use required the drilling of a new well for the community to supplement the two wells already in service. Water quality testing of the new well found arsenic levels at 20 ppb, well above the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the state of Vermont of 10 ppb.

Deck: 

Arsenic removal system helps New England town meet standards

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing coordinator for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
September 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
September 16, 2013
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

A Green Approach to POU

For our protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established enforceable guidelines by which municipalities must abide and well owners should abide. These guidelines are known as maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).

Deck: 

Filtration systems remove arsenic from school’s drinking water

About The Author: 

Chubb Michaud, CWS-VI, is technical director for Systematix Co. Michaud can be reached at askchubb@aol.com or 714.522.5453.

Publication Date: 
May 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
May 3, 2013
Issue Reference: 

Arsenic Illegally Released into California’s Groundwater

Source: 
WebWire
Deck: 

A natural gas-fired power plant in Yuba City, Calif., failed to minimize releases of hazardous waste into the environment

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has fined a natural gas-fired power plant $13,500 for improper management of hazardous waste. According to EPA, the plant, located in Yuba City, Calif., generated arsenic from the treatment of wastewater and failed to minimize releases of hazardous waste to the environment.

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Publication Date: 
August 1, 2012

Ohio Begins Testing of Arsenic Levels in Drinking Water

Deck: 

The state of Ohio is collecting water samples from homes and public water systems to determine arsenic levels throughout the region

The state of Ohio is determining regions with elevated arsenic levels in groundwater by collecting water samples from homes and public water systems. State health officials are using workshops to educate the public about the dangers of ingesting arsenic and offering tests for arsenic contamination in well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates public water systems, but it does not have the authority to regulate private drinking water wells.

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Publication Date: 
July 23, 2012

Household Technologies Available to Remove Arsenic Found in Well Water

Source: 
NGWA
Deck: 

NGWA said technologies are available to effectively treat arsenic discovered in private household well water

Technologies are available to effectively treat arsenic discovered in private household well water, the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) said recently as the federal and state governments conduct testing in Licking County, Ohio.

“While no one wants to have arsenic in the water, the good news is that water well owners who do can treat their water to safe levels with technology that is readily available,” said NGWA Public Awareness Director Cliff Treyens.

Publication Date: 
July 11, 2012

Reducing Costs for Reducing Arsenic

“Arsenic Found in Groundwater.” How many times have you seen that headline? There is no doubt that arsenic has become a common household term, used not only by teenagers studying the periodic table but also by adults who have long forgotten their high school chemistry classes.

In the last 10 years, arsenic has made headlines for various reasons. Most deal with human exposure and its associated risks.  

Arsenic is present in natural deposits in the earth. It can enter drinking water supplies from these deposits or from agricultural and industrial activities.

Deck: 

Developing less expensive POE systems for arsenic treatment

About The Author: 

Brian Donda is Gold Seal and exhibit sales manager for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at bdonda@wqa.org or 630.929.2527.

Publication Date: 
April 25, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 25, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Arsenic Free in Argentina

San Antonio de Los Cobres, a community of 6,000 residents in the Andes Mountains in Argentina, faced a challenging arsenic concentration of up to 290 ppb in its water supply. It needed a solution to reduce the level to below the maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 ppb.

Health Risks

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Remote Andean town reduces arsenic with new treatment system

About The Author: 

Esmeralda Bonilla is Latin America business manager for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Bonilla can be reached at ebonilla@adedgetechnologies.com or 866.823.3343.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Filtronics Inc. Media Receive NSF Certification

Source: 
Filtronics Inc.
Deck: 

The company's Electromedia I and V filtration media are now compliant to NSF/ANSI Standard 61

Filtronics Inc.’s Electromedia I and Electromedia V filtration media now carry certification by NSF Intl. to be compliant to NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for contact with water. The review process included an inspection of Filtronics’ manufacturing facility in Anaheim, Calif., and testing of the media materials to ensure the safe use of these filter media in the treatment of drinking water.

Publication Date: 
April 10, 2012

Chilean Community Receives Arsenic Treatment System

Source: 
AdEdge Water Technologies LLC
Deck: 

Source water contains arsenic concentrations above recommended WHO levels

AdEdge Water Technologies recently shipped an arsenic treatment system to the Arica – Pago de Gomez Water Treatment Plant in Chile to reduce arsenic levels of 18 ppb in the water source to below the arsenic maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization of 10 ppb.

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Publication Date: 
April 9, 2012

The Word on Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in August revealing that 20% of untreated water samples from wells across the U.S. contain concentrations of trace elements exceeding human health benchmarks. Raissa Rocha, editorial intern for Water Quality Products, spoke with Joe Ayotte, USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study, about the report and the occurrence of trace elements in groundwater.

Raissa Rocha: What was the purpose of this study?

About The Author: 

Joe Ayotte is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Ayotte can be reached at josephayotte@gmail.com or 603.226.7810.

Raissa Rocha is an editorial intern for Water Quality Products. Rocha can
be reached at rrocha@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7915.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23124