Hellenbrand, Inc.

Established in 1967 Hellenbrand provides residential and commercial water softening systems, Iron Curtain(TM) iron removal systems, multi-media filters, carbon filters and r.o. systems. Trade names include Hellenbrand, AutoMate, WaterMate, ProMate, Millennium and Iron Curtain.

Address

404 Moravian Valley Rd.
Waunakee, WI 53597-0187
United States
Phone: 608-849-3050
Fax: 608-849-7398

Product Categories

Water-Right, Inc.

Water-Right has manufactured water conditioning systems for residential, commercial and industrial markets since 1963. Their Sanitizer Plus Series employs a unique silica-crystal media that effectively removes hardness, iron and manganese and raises pH levels - all in a single pass. The Sanitizer Plus’s chlorine generator produces free chlorine from the system’s brine water to sanitize the media bed with every regeneration. Water-Right's Impression Series water softeners feature the ability to customize regeneration cycle sequence and all time settings to optimize operation. Comprehensive water testing services are also available through Water-Right’s state-certified laboratory.

Address

1900 Prospect Court
Appleton, WI 54914
United States
Phone: 800-777-1426
Fax: 920-739-9406

Product Categories

Industrial Test Systems, Inc.

Since 1989, Industrial Test Systems, Inc., has been manufacturing accurate colorimetric water test kits including instrumentation, eXactStrips(TM), SenSafe(TM) strips, and test strips for multiple parameters. Among our latest products is the eXact Micro 20 dual wavelength advanced photometer,a on-site meter for testing over 30 water quality parameters. ITS also developed the first and only USEPA approved test strip. ITS developed over 70 tests and proprietary chemistries many covered by our U.S. Patents and ETV/USEPA performance verified tests. All of ITS’ products are designed to be safe, easy-to-use, and affordable. Visit www.sensafe.com for a complete product listing, and to place your order.

Address

1875 Langston St
Rock Hill, SC 29730
Phone: 803-329-9712
Fax: 803-329-9743

Product Categories

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Ohio Begins Testing of Arsenic Levels in Drinking Water

Deck: 

The state of Ohio is collecting water samples from homes and public water systems to determine arsenic levels throughout the region

The state of Ohio is determining regions with elevated arsenic levels in groundwater by collecting water samples from homes and public water systems. State health officials are using workshops to educate the public about the dangers of ingesting arsenic and offering tests for arsenic contamination in well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates public water systems, but it does not have the authority to regulate private drinking water wells.

Image: 
Publication Date: 
July 23, 2012

Household Technologies Available to Remove Arsenic Found in Well Water

Source: 
NGWA
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NGWA said technologies are available to effectively treat arsenic discovered in private household well water

Technologies are available to effectively treat arsenic discovered in private household well water, the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) said recently as the federal and state governments conduct testing in Licking County, Ohio.

“While no one wants to have arsenic in the water, the good news is that water well owners who do can treat their water to safe levels with technology that is readily available,” said NGWA Public Awareness Director Cliff Treyens.

Publication Date: 
July 11, 2012

Reducing Costs for Reducing Arsenic

“Arsenic Found in Groundwater.” How many times have you seen that headline? There is no doubt that arsenic has become a common household term, used not only by teenagers studying the periodic table but also by adults who have long forgotten their high school chemistry classes.

In the last 10 years, arsenic has made headlines for various reasons. Most deal with human exposure and its associated risks.  

Arsenic is present in natural deposits in the earth. It can enter drinking water supplies from these deposits or from agricultural and industrial activities.

Deck: 

Developing less expensive POE systems for arsenic treatment

About The Author: 

Brian Donda is Gold Seal and exhibit sales manager for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at bdonda@wqa.org or 630.929.2527.

Publication Date: 
April 25, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 25, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Arsenic Free in Argentina

San Antonio de Los Cobres, a community of 6,000 residents in the Andes Mountains in Argentina, faced a challenging arsenic concentration of up to 290 ppb in its water supply. It needed a solution to reduce the level to below the maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 ppb.

Health Risks

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Remote Andean town reduces arsenic with new treatment system

About The Author: 

Esmeralda Bonilla is Latin America business manager for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Bonilla can be reached at ebonilla@adedgetechnologies.com or 866.823.3343.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

The Word on Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in August revealing that 20% of untreated water samples from wells across the U.S. contain concentrations of trace elements exceeding human health benchmarks. Raissa Rocha, editorial intern for Water Quality Products, spoke with Joe Ayotte, USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study, about the report and the occurrence of trace elements in groundwater.

Raissa Rocha: What was the purpose of this study?

About The Author: 

Joe Ayotte is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Ayotte can be reached at josephayotte@gmail.com or 603.226.7810.

Raissa Rocha is an editorial intern for Water Quality Products. Rocha can
be reached at rrocha@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7915.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23124

Arsenic & Activated Carbon

In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, better known Proposition (Prop) 65. The act requires the state to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. This list, which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include approximately 800 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.

Aiming for Arsenic

Deck: 

Preemptive testing can prevent costly penalties in California

About The Author: 

Sarah Zrout is quality manager with the Water Quality Assn. Zrout can be reached at szrout@wqa.org.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23038

A Modular Treatment Solution

Elevated levels of arsenic, iron and manganese prompted Brandywine Elementary School in Greenfield, Ind., a small town just east of Indianapolis, to seek a treatment solution for the school’s drinking water. The water system is served by one well that provides drinking water for approximately 330 students in kindergarten to fifth grade.

In July 2009, Ladd Eng. Inc. contacted AdEdge Technologies Inc. to provide a proposal for the Brandywine Elementary School in the Southern Hancock School District.

Deck: 

System remedies elementary school’s high arsenic, iron and manganese

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing
coordinator for AdEdge Technologies
Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
May 31, 2011
Activation Date: 
May 31, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22807