Reducing Costs for Reducing Arsenic

“Arsenic Found in Groundwater.” How many times have you seen that headline? There is no doubt that arsenic has become a common household term, used not only by teenagers studying the periodic table but also by adults who have long forgotten their high school chemistry classes.

In the last 10 years, arsenic has made headlines for various reasons. Most deal with human exposure and its associated risks.  

Arsenic is present in natural deposits in the earth. It can enter drinking water supplies from these deposits or from agricultural and industrial activities.

Deck: 

Developing less expensive POE systems for arsenic treatment

About The Author: 

Brian Donda is Gold Seal and exhibit sales manager for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at bdonda@wqa.org or 630.929.2527.

Publication Date: 
April 25, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 25, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Arsenic Free in Argentina

San Antonio de Los Cobres, a community of 6,000 residents in the Andes Mountains in Argentina, faced a challenging arsenic concentration of up to 290 ppb in its water supply. It needed a solution to reduce the level to below the maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 ppb.

Health Risks

Deck: 

Remote Andean town reduces arsenic with new treatment system

About The Author: 

Esmeralda Bonilla is Latin America business manager for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Bonilla can be reached at ebonilla@adedgetechnologies.com or 866.823.3343.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Filtronics Inc. Media Receive NSF Certification

Source: 
Filtronics Inc.
Deck: 

The company's Electromedia I and V filtration media are now compliant to NSF/ANSI Standard 61

Filtronics Inc.’s Electromedia I and Electromedia V filtration media now carry certification by NSF Intl. to be compliant to NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for contact with water. The review process included an inspection of Filtronics’ manufacturing facility in Anaheim, Calif., and testing of the media materials to ensure the safe use of these filter media in the treatment of drinking water.

Publication Date: 
April 10, 2012

Chilean Community Receives Arsenic Treatment System

Source: 
AdEdge Water Technologies LLC
Deck: 

Source water contains arsenic concentrations above recommended WHO levels

AdEdge Water Technologies recently shipped an arsenic treatment system to the Arica – Pago de Gomez Water Treatment Plant in Chile to reduce arsenic levels of 18 ppb in the water source to below the arsenic maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization of 10 ppb.

Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
April 9, 2012

The Word on Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in August revealing that 20% of untreated water samples from wells across the U.S. contain concentrations of trace elements exceeding human health benchmarks. Raissa Rocha, editorial intern for Water Quality Products, spoke with Joe Ayotte, USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study, about the report and the occurrence of trace elements in groundwater.

Raissa Rocha: What was the purpose of this study?

About The Author: 

Joe Ayotte is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Ayotte can be reached at josephayotte@gmail.com or 603.226.7810.

Raissa Rocha is an editorial intern for Water Quality Products. Rocha can
be reached at rrocha@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7915.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23124

Arsenic & Activated Carbon

In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, better known Proposition (Prop) 65. The act requires the state to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. This list, which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include approximately 800 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.

Aiming for Arsenic

Deck: 

Preemptive testing can prevent costly penalties in California

About The Author: 

Sarah Zrout is quality manager with the Water Quality Assn. Zrout can be reached at szrout@wqa.org.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23038

Contaminant Removal for Industrial Applications

When the McGraw Hill Data Center in East Windsor, N.J., was being built, the local municipal authority informed the company that it did not have the capacity to support the makeup water for the data center’s condensers or chill water plant. A new well was drilled to serve the plant; however, the groundwater supply had iron and manganese levels that exceeded regulatory limits.

Deck: 

System resolves high contaminant concentrations for data center

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing coordinator for AdEdge Technologies Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
July 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
July 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22898

A Modular Treatment Solution

Elevated levels of arsenic, iron and manganese prompted Brandywine Elementary School in Greenfield, Ind., a small town just east of Indianapolis, to seek a treatment solution for the school’s drinking water. The water system is served by one well that provides drinking water for approximately 330 students in kindergarten to fifth grade.

In July 2009, Ladd Eng. Inc. contacted AdEdge Technologies Inc. to provide a proposal for the Brandywine Elementary School in the Southern Hancock School District.

Deck: 

System remedies elementary school’s high arsenic, iron and manganese

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing
coordinator for AdEdge Technologies
Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
May 31, 2011
Activation Date: 
May 31, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22807

It’s Academic

College selects arsenic removal system

About The Author: 

Rich Dennis is separations process manager for Severn Trent Services.
Dennis can be reached at rdennis@severntrentservices.com or 813.886.9331.

Activation Date: 
April 29, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22718

Arsenic Advances

Arsenic and its compounds have been known to be toxic for millennia. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), often referred to as white arsenic, was a favored poison in the Middle Ages because it had little odor or taste, enabling it to be easily incorporated into the food or drink of a victim. As little as 300 mg can be fatal to an average person.

Deck: 

Solutions to an age-old threat

About The Author: 

Paul Sylvester, Ph.D., is technology development group manager for Layne Christensen Water Technologies. Sylvester can be reached at psylvester@laynechristensen.com or 508.393.5115.

Publication Date: 
April 29, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 29, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22717
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