Companies Agree to Aid EPA in Remediating Groundwater

Source: 
U.S. EPA
Deck: 

GE and SI will collect the contaminated liquid waste and send it off site for disposal

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced Wednesday that it has reached an agreement with the General Electric Co. (GE) and SI Group Inc. (formerly Schenectady Chemical) to collect and properly dispose of contaminated groundwater and liquid leaching from the Dewey Loeffel landfill that is threatening several nearby drinking water wells.

Publication Date: 
April 12, 2012

Aging Out

Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it had worked with three New Jersey school districts to successfully lower lead levels in their drinking water. Testing in 2010 and 2011 found elevated lead levels in approximately 8% of the outlets it tested at the Atlantic City, Union City and Weehawken school districts. The districts resolved the problem through a variety of methods, from filtration to replacing fixtures to simply shutting off those outlets. The latest round of testing showed that lead levels were within acceptable EPA limits.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor for Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
February 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23232

Filtration System

Company Reference: 
Spotlight Name Archive: 
New Product Showcase
Legacy ID: 
61502
Spotlight Header Archive: 
February 2012

The 360 single tank aeration filter features Clearion controls for forward and reverse motor capability, and can replenish its Oxy Chamber each night without having to backwash, saving hundreds of gallons of water per week. Fully adjustable cycles, along with Vortech tank technology, ensure the media bed is backwashed to the fullest and leaves no collected iron or sulfur contaminants.

Becoming the Expert

In December, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration announced that as a part of a collaboration, a new high-speed robotic screening system would begin testing a library of 10,000 compounds for potential toxicity.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
January 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
January 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23189

Getting the Lead Out

Lead has been a hot topic for consumers and the media for many years. We all have heard about the deterioration of U.S. water distribution systems, lead service lines, extremely high levels of lead in Washington, D.C.’s drinking water because of a change from chlorine to chloramine, lead in paint, lead in toys, new lead content laws in California and Vermont (soon to be national)—concerns about lead that will never go away.

Deck: 

Challenges in creating a consistent lead certification protocol

About The Author: 

Tom Palkon is director of product certification for the Water Quality Assn. Palkon can be reached at tpalkon@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
November 30, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 30, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23152

The Word on Wells

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in August revealing that 20% of untreated water samples from wells across the U.S. contain concentrations of trace elements exceeding human health benchmarks. Raissa Rocha, editorial intern for Water Quality Products, spoke with Joe Ayotte, USGS hydrologist and lead author of the study, about the report and the occurrence of trace elements in groundwater.

Raissa Rocha: What was the purpose of this study?

About The Author: 

Joe Ayotte is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Ayotte can be reached at josephayotte@gmail.com or 603.226.7810.

Raissa Rocha is an editorial intern for Water Quality Products. Rocha can
be reached at rrocha@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7915.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23124

A Growing Focus on Groundwater

In recent days, groundwater has been gaining attention. Increased hydraulic fracturing operations have caused controversy over potential methane gas contamination. Reports indicate that groundwater aquifers, especially in the drought-prone southwestern U.S., are being depleted more quickly than they can be recharged. Surveys, like the one recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reveal that contaminants such as arsenic are widespread in the nation’s water wells.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23116

The First Year of Low Lead

In July 2011, the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) issued its first annual report on plumbing products sampled and tested for lead concentrations in 2010. All drinking water faucets that were sampled and tested were reported to comply with the state’s new low-lead law. 

Deck: 

California checks for compliance with its first round of product testing

About The Author: 

Jerry Desmond, Jr. is West Coast consultant for Plumbing Manufacturers Intl. Desmond can be reached at info@pmihome.org or 847.481.5500.

Publication Date: 
October 26, 2011
Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23089

Emerging Chemical Concerns

Many adverse ecological effects have been attributed to pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), but it is not clear what risk they pose to human health. In the past, water was known to contain these chemicals, but the exact amount was difficult to quantify. Recently, these chemicals have gained much more attention.

Deck: 

Treatment solutions for chemicals affecting human health

About The Author: 

Robert Potwora is technical director of Carbon Resources LLC. Potwora can be reached at robert@carbonresouces.com or 760.630.5724.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23033

Contaminant Removal for Industrial Applications

When the McGraw Hill Data Center in East Windsor, N.J., was being built, the local municipal authority informed the company that it did not have the capacity to support the makeup water for the data center’s condensers or chill water plant. A new well was drilled to serve the plant; however, the groundwater supply had iron and manganese levels that exceeded regulatory limits.

Deck: 

System resolves high contaminant concentrations for data center

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing coordinator for AdEdge Technologies Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
July 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
July 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22898