A Growing Focus on Groundwater

In recent days, groundwater has been gaining attention. Increased hydraulic fracturing operations have caused controversy over potential methane gas contamination. Reports indicate that groundwater aquifers, especially in the drought-prone southwestern U.S., are being depleted more quickly than they can be recharged. Surveys, like the one recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reveal that contaminants such as arsenic are widespread in the nation’s water wells.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23116

The First Year of Low Lead

In July 2011, the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) issued its first annual report on plumbing products sampled and tested for lead concentrations in 2010. All drinking water faucets that were sampled and tested were reported to comply with the state’s new low-lead law. 

Deck: 

California checks for compliance with its first round of product testing

About The Author: 

Jerry Desmond, Jr. is West Coast consultant for Plumbing Manufacturers Intl. Desmond can be reached at info@pmihome.org or 847.481.5500.

Publication Date: 
October 26, 2011
Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23089

Emerging Chemical Concerns

Many adverse ecological effects have been attributed to pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), but it is not clear what risk they pose to human health. In the past, water was known to contain these chemicals, but the exact amount was difficult to quantify. Recently, these chemicals have gained much more attention.

Deck: 

Treatment solutions for chemicals affecting human health

About The Author: 

Robert Potwora is technical director of Carbon Resources LLC. Potwora can be reached at robert@carbonresouces.com or 760.630.5724.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23033

Contaminant Removal for Industrial Applications

When the McGraw Hill Data Center in East Windsor, N.J., was being built, the local municipal authority informed the company that it did not have the capacity to support the makeup water for the data center’s condensers or chill water plant. A new well was drilled to serve the plant; however, the groundwater supply had iron and manganese levels that exceeded regulatory limits.

Deck: 

System resolves high contaminant concentrations for data center

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing coordinator for AdEdge Technologies Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
July 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
July 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22898

Lead-Free Goes National

Worldwide, engineered plastic connectors and tubing are used in the water quality industry for a host of residential, commercial and industrial applications. From water treatment and filtration to beverage dispensing and ice making, there are several sound reasons for their widespread use.

Deck: 

Low-lead plastic products are ready for federal lead legislation

About The Author: 

Maribel Pagan is marketing communications manager for John Guest USA Inc. Pagan can be reached at maribel.pagan@johnguest.com.

Publication Date: 
July 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
July 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22896

Organic Contaminant Removal With Activated Carbon

Activated carbon is commonly used in point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) water applications. Activated carbon is predominantly used to remove organic-based contaminants and inorganic contaminants like free chlorine and monochloramine from water. Other water treatment processes such as reverse osmosis or ion exchange are better suited for other inorganic chemicals that may be present in water.

Deck: 

Factors impacting contaminant removal

About The Author: 

Robert Potwora is technical director of Carbon Resources. Potwora can be reached at robert@carbonresources.com or 760.630.5724.

Publication Date: 
May 31, 2011
Activation Date: 
May 31, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22810

A Modular Treatment Solution

Elevated levels of arsenic, iron and manganese prompted Brandywine Elementary School in Greenfield, Ind., a small town just east of Indianapolis, to seek a treatment solution for the school’s drinking water. The water system is served by one well that provides drinking water for approximately 330 students in kindergarten to fifth grade.

In July 2009, Ladd Eng. Inc. contacted AdEdge Technologies Inc. to provide a proposal for the Brandywine Elementary School in the Southern Hancock School District.

Deck: 

System remedies elementary school’s high arsenic, iron and manganese

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing
coordinator for AdEdge Technologies
Inc. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
May 31, 2011
Activation Date: 
May 31, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22807

It’s Academic

College selects arsenic removal system

About The Author: 

Rich Dennis is separations process manager for Severn Trent Services.
Dennis can be reached at rdennis@severntrentservices.com or 813.886.9331.

Activation Date: 
April 29, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22718

Arsenic Advances

Arsenic and its compounds have been known to be toxic for millennia. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), often referred to as white arsenic, was a favored poison in the Middle Ages because it had little odor or taste, enabling it to be easily incorporated into the food or drink of a victim. As little as 300 mg can be fatal to an average person.

Deck: 

Solutions to an age-old threat

About The Author: 

Paul Sylvester, Ph.D., is technology development group manager for Layne Christensen Water Technologies. Sylvester can be reached at psylvester@laynechristensen.com or 508.393.5115.

Publication Date: 
April 29, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 29, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22717

A Better Way

As its traditional ion exchange process grew more expensive for perchlorate treatment, the West Valley Water District (WVWD) sought change with a new bioremediation plant. Assistant General Manager Thomas J. Crowley, P.E., recently discussed making the switch with WQP Managing Editor Rebecca Wilhelm.

Rebecca Wilhelm:What conditions necessitated the new plant?

About The Author: 

Thomas J. Crowley, P.E., is assistant general manager, West Valley Water District. Crowley can be reached at tcrowley@wvwd.org or 909.820.3702.

Rebecca Wilhelm is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Wilhelm can be reached at bwilhelm@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 13, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22696