Aging Out

Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it had worked with three New Jersey school districts to successfully lower lead levels in their drinking water. Testing in 2010 and 2011 found elevated lead levels in approximately 8% of the outlets it tested at the Atlantic City, Union City and Weehawken school districts. The districts resolved the problem through a variety of methods, from filtration to replacing fixtures to simply shutting off those outlets. The latest round of testing showed that lead levels were within acceptable EPA limits.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor for Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
February 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23232

Getting the Lead Out

Lead has been a hot topic for consumers and the media for many years. We all have heard about the deterioration of U.S. water distribution systems, lead service lines, extremely high levels of lead in Washington, D.C.’s drinking water because of a change from chlorine to chloramine, lead in paint, lead in toys, new lead content laws in California and Vermont (soon to be national)—concerns about lead that will never go away.

Deck: 

Challenges in creating a consistent lead certification protocol

About The Author: 

Tom Palkon is director of product certification for the Water Quality Assn. Palkon can be reached at tpalkon@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
November 30, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 30, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23152

Lead-Free Goes National

Worldwide, engineered plastic connectors and tubing are used in the water quality industry for a host of residential, commercial and industrial applications. From water treatment and filtration to beverage dispensing and ice making, there are several sound reasons for their widespread use.

Deck: 

Low-lead plastic products are ready for federal lead legislation

About The Author: 

Maribel Pagan is marketing communications manager for John Guest USA Inc. Pagan can be reached at maribel.pagan@johnguest.com.

Publication Date: 
July 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
July 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22896

Meeting Low-Lead Requirements for Valves

Many manufacturers or distributors of ball, butterfly, gate, check, control, globe, plug, relief, regulator, pinch or diaphragm valves have been or may be required by state or federal law to comply with low-lead requirements. If you have been required by the state to have your valves comply with low-lead regulations, there may be some confusion on where to start and how to proceed.

Following are suggestions that will help facilitate a quicker certification as well as help eliminate headaches in the long run with the certification.

Deck: 

Researching materials leads to a smoother compliance process

About The Author: 

Glen Kosowski, CWS-VI, is facility assessment manager for the Water Quality Assn. Kosowski can be reached at gkosowski@wqa.org or 640.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
June 1, 2011
Activation Date: 
June 1, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22815

The New Low-Lead Law

With the compliance deadline approaching for California’s AB 1953, Stephanie Harris, managing editor of Water Quality Products, recently spoke with NSF’s technical manager of water distribution systems certification program, Pete Greiner, to gain insight on the new law and Annex G to NSF/ANSI Standard 61.

Deck: 

Industry Insight: Pete Greiner

About The Author: 

Stephanie Harris is managing editor Water Quality Products. Harris can be reached at 847.391.1007 or by e-mail at sharris@sgcmail.com.

Publication Date: 
September 8, 2009
Activation Date: 
September 8, 2009
Company Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
21073

Caution: Lead in Water

The interest in reducing environmental lead exposure is evident with the recent revision by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the nation’s Air Quality Standards, which were lowered from 1.5 to 0.15 ug of lead per cubic meter of air. “With these stronger standards, a new generation of Americans is protected from harmful lead emissions, especially children,” said EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson. The same goal was desired for the drinking water lead standard, which the EPA lowered in 1998 from 50 to 15 µg of lead per liter of water.

Deck: 

Elevated levels of lead in drinking water occur despite government action

About The Author: 

Ivars Jaunakais is president of Industrial Test Systems, Inc. Jaunakais can be reached at 803.329.9712 or by e-mail at ivars@sensafe.com.

Publication Date: 
December 18, 2008
Activation Date: 
December 18, 2008
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
19928

Residential Water Treatment: From the Cave to the Suburbs

Offering high-quality, custom-designed options to best meet consumer demands

About The Author: 

Jerry Horner, CWS-VI, CI, is vice president of sales and technical support for Topway Global, Inc. He can be reached at 714.255.7999, or by e-mail at jerry@tgipure.com.

Activation Date: 
March 7, 2007
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
17742

Markets, Trends & Issues in 2007

Industry professionals share their outlooks on the state of the water treatment and bottled water industries

About The Author: 

Peter J. Censky, executive director, Water Quality Association, 630.505.0160, info@mail.wqa.org; Tom Bruursema, general manager, Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment Unit Programs, NSF International, 800.NSF.MARK, bruursema@nsf.org; Paul Overbeck, executive director, Pan American Group, International Ozone Association, 480.529.3787, pauloverbeck@io3a.org; Myron Lupal, vice president, R-Can Environmental, Inc., 800.265.7246, lupal@r-can.com; Stephen Tischler, director of sales and marketing, National Testing Laboratories, Ltd., 800.458.3330, stischler@ntllabs.com; Joseph Doss, president, International Bottled Water Association, 703.683.5213, jdoss@bottledwater.org

Activation Date: 
January 5, 2007
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
17565

Research Put into Practice

There are many ways drinking water changes on its path to consumers’ taps. Corrosion of metal piping materials is one of the most significant causes of degradation. The more noticeable aesthetic degradation occurs as a result of oxidation of iron piping producing red, yellow or “rusty” water.

Deck: 

Lead in Seattle school district’s drinking water prompts major review

About The Author: 

Glen Boyd, Ph.D., and Gregory Pierson, P.E., can be reached at HDR, Inc., Seattle, Wash., at 425.450.6200, or by e-mail at glen.boyd@hdrinc.com or greg.pierson@hdrinc.com.

Publication Date: 
April 1, 2006
Activation Date: 
April 1, 2006
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16873

Whole House Filtration

Whole house filtration systems are the end of the line in defense against contaminated water. They are becoming more popular as a non-visible way (compared with end of faucet filters) to ensure safety at point of entry in the house.

Deck: 

POE Filter Addresses Contaminant Concerns

About The Author: 

Sophie Waghorn is a scientific writer and president of the marketing communications firm Across the Board Communications, in Colorado.

Activation Date: 
March 30, 2004
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15004