Study Shows BPA Can Adversely Affect Parenting Behaviors in Mice

Source: 
University of Missouri
Deck: 

Researchers have used the California mouse species to prove that offspring born to parents who are exposed to BPA receive decreased parental care by both the mother and father

Biparental care of offspring, or care that is administered by both parents, occurs in only a minority of species, including humans. Past studies have shown that maternal care can be negatively affected when females are exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals including bisphenol A (BPA); however, no studies have shown how this chemical can affect maternal and paternal care when both parents are exposed.

Image: 
Publication Date: 
June 19, 2015

EPA Proposes Changes to Cleanup Plan at Olean Well Field Site

Source: 
U.S. EPA
Deck: 

Extensive additional contamination was discovered after the 1996 cleanup plan

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to modify a cleanup plan originally issued in 1996 to address soil and groundwater at the AVX property at the Olean Well Field Superfund Site in Cattaraugus County in Olean, N.Y.

Image: 
Publication Date: 
June 16, 2015

Soil: Earth’s Largest Natural Filter

Water that enters the soil and flows downward likely will be used again by society. The most common scenario would be that the downward-flowing water recharges the groundwater reserves that are then used as a source of drinking water or for irrigation. Groundwater also often has a hydrologic connection with surface water bodies, so the characteristics of the groundwater can influence aquatic habitats in a lake or river, which then may be used as a source of drinking or irrigation water.

Deck: 

Soil’s benefits as a filter for a variety of contaminants

About The Author: 

Gary M. Pierzynski is university distinguished professor, soil and environmental chemistry, and head of the department of agronomy for Kansas State University. Pierzynski can be reached at gmp@ksu.edu or 785.532.6101.

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2015
Issue Reference: 

Study Highlights Risk of Norovirus From Swimming

Source: 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Deck: 

CDC offers tips to help swimmers stay safe in various swimming venues

When most people think of norovirus, they think of people marooned on a cruise ship with raging stomach and intestinal illness, unable to leave their cabins. However, an outbreak at an Oregon lake underscores that swimming also can put the public at risk of catching this disease. Fortunately, following a few easy and effective steps can help maximize the health benefits of swimming while minimizing the risk of getting sick.

Image: 
Publication Date: 
May 18, 2015

Water Disinfection Technology Removes a Wide Variety of Contaminants

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2015

Our bodies of water are constantly sustaining the impact of ecological and environmental changes. Our municipalities are treating water from these sources with harsh chemicals and delivering it to communities. Increasingly aware of these facts, consumers are demanding point-of-use filtration products that ensure that their families are drinking safe, clean water. HaloPure technology was created with these consumers in mind.

Company Reference: 

Sulfate Removal Membrane

Company Reference: 

NFS is a nanofiltration (NF) membrane formulated to deliver sulfate rejection and flux performance in sulfate removal applications. In addition to exhibiting high mechanical strength and durability, the membrane provides a 30% increase in flux efficiency and more than 99.5% average sulfate rejection when tested under typical seawater operating conditions. This type of NF technology is ideal for enhanced oil recovery during water flooding processes through the prevention of scaling and oil well souring. 

Arsenic Treatment System

Company Reference: 
Spotlight Name Archive: 
General
Legacy ID: 
60394
Spotlight Header Archive: 
April 2011

AdVantEdge Medallion Series POE systems by AdEdge Technologies are ideal for whole-house arsenic treatment. They require no chemicals and no regeneration for low maintenance, worry-free arsenic removal for the entire household. This economical and effective whole-house treatment employs an adsorption process using Bayoxide E-33 granular ferric oxide to provide the best arsenic removal performance of any available technology, and is considered the standard in the industry.

Marquette University Receives Federal Grant to Study Drinking Water Treatment

Source: 
Marquette University
Deck: 

The research will be done in the university’s Water Quality Center

A group of professors in the Opus College of Engineering at Marquette University has received a $199,679 grant from the National Science Foundation to study drinking water treatment.

The research will be done in Marquette’s Water Quality Center, housed in the college’s Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering and led by Dr. Brooke Mayer, assistant professor. She will collaborate with Dr. Daniel Zitomer, professor and director of the Water Quality Center, and Dr. Patrick McNamara, assistant professor.

Image: 
Publication Date: 
March 27, 2015

New Standard Verifies Removal of Cryptosporidium From Public Drinking Water

Source: 
NSF Intl.
Deck: 

NSF/ANSI 419: Public Drinking Water Equipment Performance – Filtration evaluates the performance of municipal water filtration technologies in removing Cryptosporidium

Global public health organization NSF Intl. published the first consensus-based American National Standard to evaluate the performance of municipal water filtration technologies in removing Cryptosporidium from public drinking water supplies. The new standard—NSF/ANSI 419: Public Drinking Water Equipment Performance – Filtration—incorporates state and federal regulatory requirements, assisting state regulators in verifying compliance while reducing time and costs for manufacturers by streamlining the testing process.

Image: 
Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
March 19, 2015

Researchers to Return to Everest to Continue Water Contamination Studies

Source: 
Ball State University
Deck: 

Ball State researchers are studying the impact of human waste on Mount Everest's water resources

Ball State University faculty and students are returning to Mount Everest in May to expand their research into how extensively human waste left by climbers is contaminating water resources on the world’s tallest mountain.

Led by Kirsten Nicholson, a Ball State geological sciences professor, the team will spend several weeks in Nepal to conduct studies as part of the university’s Himalayan Sustainability Initiative. 

Image: 
Publication Date: 
March 16, 2015
Email Subscriptions