WQA to Host Mitigating Recontamination Webinar

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Water Quality Assn.
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Webinar will identify treatment technologies and equipment needed to mitigate recontamination

The Water Quality Assn. (WQA) will host its Mitigating Recontamination webinar on Feb. 5, 2014, at 2 p.m. EST. The webinar will explain where recontamination may occur and identify treatment technologies and equipment needed to mitigate recontamination. In order for your registration to be processed, it much be purchased no later than 5 p.m. EST on Feb. 4.

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Publication Date: 
January 28, 2014

Arsenic Reduction Systems

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Nelsen Arsenic Reduction Systems feature the 7000PID (Nelsen proprietary controller) arsenic reduction control valve and LayneRT adsorption media. The 7000PID is a non-backwashing controller programmed for the specific water chemistry for each installation. It indicates system capacity and the remaining safe levels of media adsorption. LayneRT is a proprietary, durable, arsenic-selective media.

NGWA Provides Guidance on Hydrogen Sulfide

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NGWA
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New best suggested practice developed for water well system professionals

The National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) has developed an industry best suggested practice (BSP) for water well system professionals to use on how to deal with problematic concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in residential water well systems.

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Publication Date: 
November 13, 2013

Heavy Metal Encore

Just when you thought you had read enough about heavy metal in the Unger household and heavy metals in water, I am back! Last month I discussed the various challenge waters used for testing filters that make claims for heavy metals. These challenge waters are influenced by the various water supplies across the U.S.

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Testing procedures for heavy metal removal certification

About The Author: 

Mark T. Unger, CWS-VI, is technical and training manager for the Water Quality Assn. Unger can be reached at munger@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
November 12, 2013
Activation Date: 
November 12, 2013
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Rock On With Certified Systems

It’s a lazy Saturday morning at the Unger house. Mom is at work, and she left me and the kids (ages 11, nine, seven and five) a giant list of chores to complete while she is away. The problem is, we do not have much enthusiasm or energy to get them done — so what do we do?

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Understanding the science behind heavy metal filtration certification

About The Author: 

Mark T. Unger, CWS-VI, is technical and training manager for the Water Quality Assn. Unger can be reached at munger@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
October 17, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 17, 2013
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Drinking Water Downpour

When most people think of rainwater harvesting, they picture a 55-gal tank that collects rainwater from the roof to water plants — but this term also extends to natural collection systems like dams. Rainwater harvesting is nothing new; it has been around for centuries, dating back to ancient Egyptians who used earthen dams to control runoff. Another example is the rice terraces of the Philippines, which are still in existence today. More sophisticated rainwater systems have been uncovered by archaeologists in Crete, Istanbul and throughout the Mediterranean region.

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Regulation & contamination factors for potable rainwater reuse applications

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business manager for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. Metzger can be reached at mmetzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Heavy Metal Mine Monitoring

Isaac Plains is an open-cut coal mine in northern Queensland, Australia, that operates under an environmental authority. One of the environmental monitoring requirements that must be met is water monitoring. This includes monitoring potable water, mine-affected water, natural creek flows, water releases, groundwater and the receiving environment.

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Onsite testing technology helps mine meet water monitoring requirements

About The Author: 

Marty Dugan is chief marketing officer for ANDalyze Inc. Dugan can be reached at mdugan@andalyze.com or 617.281.6743.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Countdown to Lead-Free

The Federal Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act, which passed in 2011, will go into full effect on Jan. 4, 2014. It may come as a surprise that the plumbing industry, through Plumbing Manufacturers Intl. (PMI), was a primary proponent of getting this law passed, in the spirit of harmonizing regulations across the U.S.

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Organizations work together to prepare the industry for the low-lead deadline

About The Author: 

Barbara C. Higgens is executive director of Plumbing Manufacturers Intl. Higgens can be reached at bhiggens@pmihome.org or 847.481.5500

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Not So Rock 'n' Roll

At first glance, this issue of Water Quality Products might seem to have a rock ‘n’ roll theme, with phrases like “rock on” and “heavy metal” peppering the article titles — but unfortunately the issue at hand is anything but rock ‘n’ roll.

The focus of these articles is heavy metals, contaminants that lately have been making more waves than usual within the industry. Between the quickly approaching deadline for the new federal low-lead law and the recent release of California’s proposed chromium-6 limit, it is one that will continue to be a concern.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Small System, Big Benefits

The town of Newport Center, Vt., is a small community of approximately 1,500 residents located just south of the U.S.-Canada border. A combination of drought and increased water use required the drilling of a new well for the community to supplement the two wells already in service. Water quality testing of the new well found arsenic levels at 20 ppb, well above the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the state of Vermont of 10 ppb.

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Arsenic removal system helps New England town meet standards

About The Author: 

Richard J. Cavagnaro is marketing coordinator for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Cavagnaro can be reached at rjcavagnaro@adedgetechnologies.com or 678.730.6506.

Publication Date: 
September 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
September 16, 2013
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