Marquette University Receives Federal Grant to Study Drinking Water Treatment

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Marquette University
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The research will be done in the university’s Water Quality Center

A group of professors in the Opus College of Engineering at Marquette University has received a $199,679 grant from the National Science Foundation to study drinking water treatment.

The research will be done in Marquette’s Water Quality Center, housed in the college’s Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering and led by Dr. Brooke Mayer, assistant professor. She will collaborate with Dr. Daniel Zitomer, professor and director of the Water Quality Center, and Dr. Patrick McNamara, assistant professor.

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Publication Date: 
March 27, 2015

New Standard Verifies Removal of Cryptosporidium From Public Drinking Water

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NSF Intl.
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NSF/ANSI 419: Public Drinking Water Equipment Performance – Filtration evaluates the performance of municipal water filtration technologies in removing Cryptosporidium

Global public health organization NSF Intl. published the first consensus-based American National Standard to evaluate the performance of municipal water filtration technologies in removing Cryptosporidium from public drinking water supplies. The new standard—NSF/ANSI 419: Public Drinking Water Equipment Performance – Filtration—incorporates state and federal regulatory requirements, assisting state regulators in verifying compliance while reducing time and costs for manufacturers by streamlining the testing process.

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Publication Date: 
March 19, 2015

Researchers to Return to Everest to Continue Water Contamination Studies

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Ball State University
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Ball State researchers are studying the impact of human waste on Mount Everest's water resources

Ball State University faculty and students are returning to Mount Everest in May to expand their research into how extensively human waste left by climbers is contaminating water resources on the world’s tallest mountain.

Led by Kirsten Nicholson, a Ball State geological sciences professor, the team will spend several weeks in Nepal to conduct studies as part of the university’s Himalayan Sustainability Initiative. 

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Publication Date: 
March 16, 2015

Drinking Water System

The H-300-NXT Everpure line of luxury residential water filtration products is certified to NSF/ANSI Standard 401 for the removal of contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, over-the-counter medications and chemical compounds including bisphenol A. The pleated filter membrane is 30% larger than the standard H-300 and provides 50% greater dirt-holding capacity and contaminant reduction capability while maintaining longer filter life. The drinking water system can be installed in kitchens or wet bars and can be connected to appliances.

Culligan to Design, Install Treatment Plant in Rwanda

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Culligan Intl.
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New facility will help Rwanda's capital city meet current & projected drinking water needs

The Water and Sanitation Corp. Ltd. (WASAC) in Rwanda awarded Culligan Intl. a contract to design and install a water treatment plant to provide drinking water to Kigali, that country’s capital city. WASAC is a government company that provides water to Kigali City and all urban centers of the country.

“Kigali needs about 100,000 cu meters of water per day while water supplied is 65,000 cu meters per day, which implies a shortage of about 35,000 cu meters per day,” said James Sano, CEO of WASAC Eng.

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Publication Date: 
February 18, 2015

States Develop Strategies to Reduce Nutrient Levels in Mississippi River & Gulf of Mexico

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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States that make up the Hypoxia Task Force are working together to reduce nutrient levels nearby waterways

The 12 U.S. states of the Hypoxia Task Force have devised new strategies to speed up reduction of nutrient levels in waterways in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin. High nutrient levels are a key contributor each summer to the large area of low oxygen in the Gulf of Mexico known as a dead zone. Each state has outlined specific actions it will take to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin from wastewater plants, industries, agriculture and storm water runoff. 

Publication Date: 
February 13, 2015
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States Develop Strategies to Reduce Nutrient Levels in Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico

Draft Contaminant Candidate List Published

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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EPA publishes its fourth Draft Contaminant Candidate List

To ensure continued protection of public health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published for public review and comment a draft list of contaminants that are not currently regulated in drinking water, but may require regulations in the future under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). The agency will evaluate and consider the public comments on developing the final Draft Contaminant Candidate List (CCL 4) and suggestions for improvements to the process for future CCLs.

Publication Date: 
February 12, 2015

Contaminant Cleanup

In the late 1990s, a coking facility in Detroit closed, and the site was subjected to strict cleanup requirements as part of new government regulations. As part of the overall site cleanup, the facility was required to capture groundwater contaminated with creosote oil, aromatic hydrocarbons, ammonia and iron, and prevent it from migrating off site and contaminating surrounding areas. The final destination for the groundwater was a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

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Bioreactor technology chosen to treat groundwater on the site of a former Michigan coking facility

About The Author: 

Abigail Antolovich is strategic marketing manager for UOP, a Honeywell Co. Antolovich can be reached at abigail.antolovich@honeywell.com or 847.224.5739.

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
Activation Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Man-Made Pollutants Finding Their Way Into Groundwater Through Septic Systems

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U.S. Geological Survey
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A new study found that septic systems leak man-made pollutants into groundwater

Pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products associated with everyday household activities are finding their way into groundwater through septic systems in New York and New England, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).    

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Study Reveals Man-made Pollutants From Septic Systems in Groundwater

EPA Announces Voluntary Cancellation of Certain Methomyl Uses

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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EPA's cancellation of certain methomyl uses will reduce risks to drinking water

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the manufacturers of the insecticide methomyl have agreed to cancel some uses and limit use on certain crops to reduce risks to drinking water. From 1995 to 2013, exposure from food to carbamates, which includes methomyl, has fallen by approximately 70%. The action is a continuation of EPA’s effort to reduce carbamate use, thereby protecting people’s health, especially the health of children who may be more sensitive to pesticides. 

Publication Date: 
February 6, 2015
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EPA Announces Voluntary Cancellation of Certain Methomyl Uses

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