Who Are You Most Like?

We have observed that great salespeople spend a lot of time examining their attitudes and habits and selling themselves everyday on the ones that lead to success. Success requires recharging and selling yourself everyday. Look at the chart and see which column best describes you.

About The Author: 

Carl Davidson is president of Sales & Management Solutions, which provides sales and management training designed exclusively for the water equipment industry. For more than 13 years, he has helped more than 1,400 companies in seven countries. For a free demonstration tape and catalog, contact the company at 800.941.0068; www.salesco.net.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11901

The One Sales Secret I Hate to Reveal

As someone who makes a living teaching people to sell, there is one sales secret I hate to reveal. The fact is, you don’t have to be a great salesperson to be successful selling water equipment. If the product is good and the demonstration is powerful, three things can make even unlikely people wildly successful.

About The Author: 

Carl Davidson is president of Sales & Management Solutions, which provides sales and management training designed exclusively for the water equipment industry. For more than 13 years, he has helped more than 1,400 companies in seven countries. For a free demonstration tape and catalog, contact the company at 800-941-0068; www.salesco.net.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11865

Cooking at the Boiling Point

If you go for the close before or after the boiling point, you are much less likely to get a sale.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11825

Dreaming the Dream, Selling the Show

Last month, we discussed feeling customers' pain, which builds desire for change, but change to what? This month, we will discuss dreaming the dream, making the customer visualize enjoying the benefits of your products and services.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11751

Cybersupport: The Key Reason for Web Presence

Putting customer service, customer support and technical documentation on a website is key in competing in the marketplace.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11713

How Much Is a Salesperson Worth?

Many companies want to have great salespeople but have trouble attracting and keeping them. How you value, attract and maintain your sales team is a harbinger of the health of your company.There once was a water equipment dealer who needed a new delivery truck. He wanted a new Dodge with all the power and accessories he needed to get the job done and enhance his company’s image. The truck retailed for $32,000 but our subject went to a lot of dealers and offered them far less. Finally, he got a great truck but never changed the oil or washed it or maintained it.

About The Author: 

Carl Davidson is president of Sales & Management Solutions, which provides sales and management training designed exclusively for the water equipment industry. For more than 13 years, he has helped more than 1,400 companies in seven countries. For a free demonstration tape and catalog, contact the company at 800.941.0068; www.salesco.net.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11715

Feeling Their Pain

Marketing tests have shown that people will do more to avoid pain than to achieve pleasure. Pain and fear of loss are powerful motivators, and they can be used to make the sale.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11674

Road Map to the Sale

A top salesperson suggested trying a "road map" to close the sale by telling the customer what is going to happen at every stage and then lead them to the sale.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11646

Reverses Make the Sale

Many salespeople spend a lot of time working on getting the sale but spend very little practicing what to do when the customer says "No." The national closing rate in our industry is about one out of every three demonstrations. That means 66 out of 100 prospects are going to say "No" and mean it. Even the 33 percent who eventually say "Yes," actually say "No" the first four times they are asked for the order. This means that about 99 percent of the people you talk to are going to say "No," at least at first.

Deck: 

Listed are some techniques that will help you develop solid plans for turning "No" into a sale

About The Author: 

Carl Davidson is president of Sales & Management Solutions, which provides sales and management training designed exclusively for the water equipment industry. For more than 13 years, he has helped more than 1,400 companies in seven countries. For a free demonstration tape and catalog, contact the company at 800-941-0068; www.salesco.net.

Please e-mail all questions and topic ideas to wqpeditor@sgcmail.com.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11599

Using Optimism to Make the Sale

Can optimism help you make an extra $10,000 to $20,000 a year? It can if professional optimism is practiced in all sales situations.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11566