AWWA: SDWA Anniversary Cause to Celebrate, 'Renew Our Commitment' to Safe Water

Source: 
American Water Works Assn.
Deck: 

AWWA CEO David LaFrance thanks water professionals nationwide for keeping water safe for drinking

Dec. 16, 2014, marked the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which today includes regulations for more than 90 contaminants. American Water Works Assn. (AWWA) CEO David LaFrance issued the following statement to mark the occasion.

Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
December 18, 2014

The Impact of Safe Water

On the shores of Lake Victoria in Uganda there is a rural community called Maruba. Rain is rare, so the people of Maruba used to rely on the lake as their only source of freshwater. Unfortunately, it was teeming with microbiological contaminants that cause waterborne diseases such as schistosomiasis, dysentery and diarrhea. The water was further contaminated by pesticides used by local farmers to treat crops. Rain would wash these harmful chemicals into the lake.

Deck: 

Solar-powered treatment system provides clean water for Uganda community

About The Author: 

Lauren McCarter is development assistant for Water Missions Intl. McCarter can be reached at lmccarter@watermissions.org or 843.769.7395.

Publication Date: 
February 6, 2014
Activation Date: 
February 6, 2014
Issue Reference: 

Battle of the Disinfectants

Chlorine is and has been the No. 1 disinfectant used by water treatment systems throughout the world for more than 100 years. Currently, a majority of municipal water systems use chlorine to disinfect their drinking water. Recently, though, concerns over chlorine’s limitations have emerged, and research into alternative disinfectants is ongoing.

Deck: 

New disinfection options may provide alternatives to traditional chlorine

About The Author: 

Dean Jarog is laboratory analyst for the Water Quality Assn. Jarog can be reached at djarog@wqa.org or 630.929.2544

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Diving Into Disease

Reading the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Web pages on recreational water illnesses (RWIs) is enough to make someone never want set foot in a swimming pool again. From the list of pathogens that can cause RWIs (which includes some nasty fellows, such as Cryptosporidium, Legionella, E. coli and more) to statistics on sources of disease (“on average, people have about 0.14 grams of feces on their bottoms”), the cringe factor is high.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 547.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
Issue Reference: 

CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

Source: 
CDC
Deck: 

Fifty-eight percent of pool filter samples tested positive for E. coli

A study of public pools done during last summer’s swim season found that feces are frequently introduced into pool water by swimmers. Through the study, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers found germs in samples of pool filter water collected from public pools.

Publication Date: 
May 22, 2013
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CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

UNICEF Begins Delivery of Water Treatment Supplies to Syria

Source: 
UNICEF
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UNICEF to deliver 1,000 tons of chlorine across all 14 governorates in Syria

A large-scale operation is underway in Syria to secure safe water supplies for more than 10 million people — close to half the population, according to UNICEF.

The first four trucks, carrying 80 tons of sodium hypochlorite water chlorination supplies, crossed the Jordanian border into Syria on Feb. 3, heading for Homs, Aleppo, Hama and Idleb. Over the coming weeks, UNICEF will deliver 1,000 tons of chlorine to cities and communities across all 14 governorates in Syria.

Publication Date: 
February 6, 2013
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UNICEF Begins Delivery of Water Treatment Supplies for 10 Million People in Syria

Sanitization for Safe Water

The Water Quality Assn.’s Guidelines for Disinfection and Sanitization of Water Treatment Equipment recommend that equipment be disinfected every six months, when it is serviced, after installation and when there is a contamination issue with the source water. If water treatment equipment is not properly sanitized, bacteria can grow and multiply on the inside surfaces of tanks and hoses.

Deck: 

Options for sanitizing RO and softener equipment

About The Author: 

Justin Ramsey is marketing manager for Pro Products LLC. Ramsey can be reached at jramsey@proproducts.com or 800.285.9176.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2012
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23272

Battling Bacteria With Chlorine

Homeowners with a private well as their primary drinking water source are responsible for ensuring the safety of their water. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), well owners should test their water at least once a year for bacteria, nitrates, total dissolved solids, pH and any other suspected contaminants. Additional testing should be considered if there have been any repairs to the well, the wellhead gets flooded, there are recurring gastrointestinal problems in the household, or there are any noticeable changes in color, odor or taste.

Deck: 

Procedures for chlorinating a private residential well

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business manager for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. and a member of the WQP Editorial Advisory Board. Metzger can be reached at mmetzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2012
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23271

Disinfection for Safe Water

Water supplies can contain living organisms such as bacteria, protozoa, worms, viruses and fungi. When these organisms are the sources of diseases, they are known as pathogens.

Pathogens can lead to infectious diseases such as typhoid fever, dysentery, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, cholera, jaundice, hepatitis, undulant fever and tularemia, making the water supply unsafe for human consumption. Disinfection plays a key part in turning non-potable water into water that is microbiologically safe to drink.

Deck: 

Eliminating pathogens to protect human health

About The Author: 

Amy Reichel is sales associate for the Water Quality Assn. Reichel can be reached at areichel@wqa.org or 630.505.9637.

Publication Date: 
February 3, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 3, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23223

Safe & Green Legionella Prevention

One of the largest and most well-respected teaching hospitals in Illinois is also home to a central power plant with 7,000 tons of cooling tower capacity and a 100,000-gal central chilled water loop. When newly issued corporate responsibility guidelines encouraged sustainability and green practices at its facilities, the hospital sought expertise to streamline its efforts.

Deck: 

Onsite generation provides disinfection for Illinois hospital

About The Author: 

Beth Boeh is manager of marketing communications for MIOX Corp. Boeh can be reached at beth.boeh@miox.com or 505.224.1140.

Publication Date: 
January 25, 2012
Activation Date: 
January 25, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23191