Disinfection, Part 1: Developments in Ultraviolet Disinfection

One of the fastest growing technologies in the water treatment industry is ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. UV disinfection adds no chemicals, and it does not produce byproducts. Additional benefits include easy installation, low maintenance, minimal space requirements and whole-house (point-of-entry) treatment.

Activation Date: 
December 30, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13474

Air Purification With Ultraviolet Light

While consumer demand has escalated for water purifying devices, it pales in comparison to what has happened in air purifying. The indoor air purification industry still is in its infancy, yet is recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to be a market valued well into the billions.

Deck: 

A perfect fit for water treatment dealers

About The Author: 

John Garrett is president and CEO of Biozone Scientific, a manufacturer of air and water purification devices using lightwave-based technologies. Garrett holds several patents, has worked with major corporations and government agencies on air contamination issues, and has been a frequent lecturer in the United States and abroad on indoor air quality and ultraviolet light.

Publication Date: 
November 27, 2002
Activation Date: 
November 27, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13443

Ultraviolet Technology

The use of quartz sleeves in ultraviolet (UV) light's treatment of water has been the medium of choice for many years. Now there seems to be an upheaval in the ranks, which brings into light compact system designs, longer contact times, less shadowing, cost savings and easier, safer change outs. Coiled fluoropolymer tubes are not new--they have been used in the Asian market for more than eight years. They may not be as time tested as their quartz counterpart, but the coiled tubes offer a very promising change in UV water treatment.

Deck: 

Coiled Tubes vs. Quartz Sleeves in UV Applications

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association and has a background in chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University. He is the owner of Aqua Ion Plus+ Technologies and can be reached for comment at 219-362-7279; jeff@aquaionplus.com; www.aquaionplus.com. The coiled tubes discussed in this article are manufactured by Markel Corp., Norristown, Pa.

Activation Date: 
November 27, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13442

Situation Normal During a UV Disinfection Retrofit

At the Patuxent Water Reclamation Facility in Anne Arundel County, Md., a carefully considered construction sequence will keep the facility in operation during its retrofit from chlorine to UV disinfection. Construction started in June 2002 and is expected to be complete by summer 2003.

Deck: 

Wastewater Treatment

About The Author: 

Brian M. Balchunas, P.E., is a project manager with PBS&J, a full-service nationwide consulting firm with expertise in environmental science and engineering. Balchunas is a chemical engineer and is recognized as a disinfection expert. He can be reached at 301-210-6800 or BMBalchunas@pbsj.com.

Lawrence H. Hentz, P.E., D.E.E., is a division manager for PBS&J. Hentz serves as the principal technical professional for PBS&J's Water/Wastewater Services. He can be reached at 301-210-6800 or LHHentz@pbsj.com.

Activation Date: 
November 4, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13412

Ultraviolet Disinfection of Drinking Water: A Growing Trend

The use of ultraviolet (UV) light for the treatment of drinking water is becoming more acceptable by both the public and regulatory agencies as an alternative disinfectant. Water suppliers that are developing new water treatment facilities or modifying existing ones now commonly investigate this technology to determine its applicability to their treatment processes.

Deck: 

Microbe Inactivation

About The Author: 

Richard Protasowicki is a project engineer for Dufresne-Henry in the firm's Westford, Mass., office.

Activation Date: 
November 4, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13407

River Contaminates Town’s Water Supply When State Leaves It to Beavers

For nearly 70 years, the public water system in the Town of Sterling, Massachusetts operated without incident, delivering clean water to more than 2,000 homes. Because the water from the town’s well field was clean and free of contamination, there was no need for a permanent disinfection system. That all changed in September 1999 when a storm caused by Hurricane Floyd and the state’s increasing beaver population combined to cause bacterial contamination in the town’s water supply.

Deck: 

Ultraviolet Disinfection

Activation Date: 
July 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13199

Ultraviolet Dechlorination Technology

At the Procter & Gamble manufacturing plant in Greensboro, N.C., an Aquionics ultraviolet (UV) dechlorination unit was installed before two banks of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Trials that ran soon after the UV system’s installation showed a dramatic reduction in the RO membrane wash frequency—down from an average of eight cleanings per month to only two per month.

Deck: 

Reverse Osmosis Membranes Maintenance Costs Reduced

About The Author: 

Aquionics offers more than 20 years experience in the manufacture, application and development of UV equipment for progressive, nonchemical disinfection and contamination control. For more information, call 800-925-0440; www.aquionics.com.

Activation Date: 
June 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13172

Developments in Ozone Technology

Ozone technology developments have opened new applications for these established water treatment technologies. Driving these changes has been the identification of new, more disinfection-resistant microorganisms such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium cysts and governmental regulations designed to protect the public health from the hazards of ingestion of these microorganisms. Additionally, the desire to prevent or minimize the formation of halogenated disinfection byproducts formed during chlorination has stimulated new interest in the use of ozone. Combinations of ozone with hydrogen peroxide and/or ultraviolet (UV) radiation can destroy many contaminants present in ground water.

Deck: 

Small Systems Adopt Ozone Technology to Protect Against Cryptosporidium, Giardia

About The Author: 

Rip G. Rice, Ph.D., is the owner of RICE International Consulting Enterprises in Ashton, Md. He is the author of many papers regarding ozone and ultraviolet technologies, as well as a speaker on the subjects.

Activation Date: 
June 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13171

Back to the Basics, Part 2

How does everyone achieve effluent water that meets their needs and demands? Each situation is different, but a simplistic explanation of various technologies will be discussed in this article. Each of the following categories has had much written about them, but this article will be an overview of several methods in order to help you educate the general public so they can make an intelligent decision, purchase something of value and continually seek professional consultation.

Deck: 

Brushing up on water treatment 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a certified water specialist-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and has helped develop UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario. He is a master distributor of Ethylene Control, Inc., in addition to being a distributor of Hanna Instrument, Pura and Hydrotechnology Filtration Systems, and Pro-Zone International Ozone Products. He is the owner of Aqua Ion Plus+ Technologies and can be e-mailed at jeff@aquaionplus.com; 219-362-7279; www.aquaionplus.com.

Publication Date: 
May 28, 2002
Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13127

Back to the Basics, Part 1

Basic water chemistry, terminology and applications can be very complicated and not seem so basic to individuals without a chemistry background. This series of articles will help shed light on the chemistry of water and the mysteries that it can contain, plus explain the technologies used to treat water so the purchaser can make an educated attempt to find the right solution for a particular application. There are no cut-and-dry formulas for water treatment and certainly no cure-all for every application or problem, but with an understanding of how water works and the technologies developed to treat water, a person can utilize his resources to come up with solutions for his particular need or application.

Deck: 

Brushing Up on Water Chemistry 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario, Canada.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13083
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