Ultraviolet Disinfection of Drinking Water: A Growing Trend

The use of ultraviolet (UV) light for the treatment of drinking water is becoming more acceptable by both the public and regulatory agencies as an alternative disinfectant. Water suppliers that are developing new water treatment facilities or modifying existing ones now commonly investigate this technology to determine its applicability to their treatment processes.

Deck: 

Microbe Inactivation

About The Author: 

Richard Protasowicki is a project engineer for Dufresne-Henry in the firm's Westford, Mass., office.

Activation Date: 
November 4, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13407

River Contaminates Town’s Water Supply When State Leaves It to Beavers

For nearly 70 years, the public water system in the Town of Sterling, Massachusetts operated without incident, delivering clean water to more than 2,000 homes. Because the water from the town’s well field was clean and free of contamination, there was no need for a permanent disinfection system. That all changed in September 1999 when a storm caused by Hurricane Floyd and the state’s increasing beaver population combined to cause bacterial contamination in the town’s water supply.

Deck: 

Ultraviolet Disinfection

Activation Date: 
July 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13199

Ultraviolet Dechlorination Technology

At the Procter & Gamble manufacturing plant in Greensboro, N.C., an Aquionics ultraviolet (UV) dechlorination unit was installed before two banks of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Trials that ran soon after the UV system’s installation showed a dramatic reduction in the RO membrane wash frequency—down from an average of eight cleanings per month to only two per month.

Deck: 

Reverse Osmosis Membranes Maintenance Costs Reduced

About The Author: 

Aquionics offers more than 20 years experience in the manufacture, application and development of UV equipment for progressive, nonchemical disinfection and contamination control. For more information, call 800-925-0440; www.aquionics.com.

Activation Date: 
June 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13172

Developments in Ozone Technology

Ozone technology developments have opened new applications for these established water treatment technologies. Driving these changes has been the identification of new, more disinfection-resistant microorganisms such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium cysts and governmental regulations designed to protect the public health from the hazards of ingestion of these microorganisms. Additionally, the desire to prevent or minimize the formation of halogenated disinfection byproducts formed during chlorination has stimulated new interest in the use of ozone. Combinations of ozone with hydrogen peroxide and/or ultraviolet (UV) radiation can destroy many contaminants present in ground water.

Deck: 

Small Systems Adopt Ozone Technology to Protect Against Cryptosporidium, Giardia

About The Author: 

Rip G. Rice, Ph.D., is the owner of RICE International Consulting Enterprises in Ashton, Md. He is the author of many papers regarding ozone and ultraviolet technologies, as well as a speaker on the subjects.

Activation Date: 
June 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13171

Back to the Basics, Part 2

How does everyone achieve effluent water that meets their needs and demands? Each situation is different, but a simplistic explanation of various technologies will be discussed in this article. Each of the following categories has had much written about them, but this article will be an overview of several methods in order to help you educate the general public so they can make an intelligent decision, purchase something of value and continually seek professional consultation.

Deck: 

Brushing up on water treatment 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a certified water specialist-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and has helped develop UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario. He is a master distributor of Ethylene Control, Inc., in addition to being a distributor of Hanna Instrument, Pura and Hydrotechnology Filtration Systems, and Pro-Zone International Ozone Products. He is the owner of Aqua Ion Plus+ Technologies and can be e-mailed at jeff@aquaionplus.com; 219-362-7279; www.aquaionplus.com.

Publication Date: 
May 28, 2002
Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13127

Back to the Basics, Part 1

Basic water chemistry, terminology and applications can be very complicated and not seem so basic to individuals without a chemistry background. This series of articles will help shed light on the chemistry of water and the mysteries that it can contain, plus explain the technologies used to treat water so the purchaser can make an educated attempt to find the right solution for a particular application. There are no cut-and-dry formulas for water treatment and certainly no cure-all for every application or problem, but with an understanding of how water works and the technologies developed to treat water, a person can utilize his resources to come up with solutions for his particular need or application.

Deck: 

Brushing Up on Water Chemistry 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario, Canada.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13083

Ultraviolet for Disinfection

Historically, industry has relied on hazardous chemicals such as chlorine and expensive processes such as pasteurization to rid its water supplies of pathogens. Currently, though, the use of ultraviolet (UV) light, the same as the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum of sunlight responsible for killing microorganisms, is providing a safe, reliable and highly effective method of getting the job done.

Deck: 

The science, selection and applications

About The Author: 

Tom Schaefer is the national sales manager at Aquionics, Erlanger, Ky., a manufacturer of ultraviolet technology for disinfection, deozonation, dechlorination and total organic carbon removal. He can be reached at toms@aquionics.com or 800-925-0440 ext. 118.

Activation Date: 
March 27, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13031

New Test Technique Measures Light to Gauge Toxicity

Security measures do exist to safeguard our public water supply. Utilities routinely employ techniques such as chlorination, filtration, and ultraviolet treatment, to name a few. However, given the changes that have taken place in the world since September 11, 2001, the prospect for intentional contamination seems more possible than ever before. We want to have confidence that our existing security measures and analytics are adequate but with so many possibilities, how can we?

Deck: 

System developed for UK military now available to water companies in America

Activation Date: 
June 16, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12885

Bioterrorism May Pose Threat to Water Supplies

If our water supplies actually do come under attack, the question remains: Is there any way for consumers to protect themselves? Unfortunately, it seems to be too early to tell, yet some companies are beginning to emerge with products that may be the answer.

Deck: 

Can POU/POE technology aid the war on bioterrorism?

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is the editor of Water Quality Products and may be reached at wqpeditor@sgcmail.com. Linda Chaloux is an environmental industry analyst for Frost & Sullivan and is focused on water and wastewater applications, specifically on water recycling. She has authored 125 technical articles in 30 publications, completed two industry reports and published a field testing method for Hexavalent Chromium (VI).

Activation Date: 
December 4, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12809

Water and Air UV Treatment

UV is an accepted and rapidly growing technology for treating wastewater in the United States. In Europe, it commonly is used as a primary disinfectant in municipal drinking water systems. Other applications include food and beverage, pharmaceutical, semiconductor and power generation. This article will discuss three other commercially successful and growing applications.

Deck: 

Successful Ultraviolet for Commercial Applications

About The Author: 

Bak Srikanth is manager of applications and project proposals at Aquafine Corp. He has been with Aquafine since 1994, where he previously was senior applications engineer. He manages all applications engineering, process R&D and capital project proposal functions. He has several years of work experience in the water treatment and purification industry. He may be reached at 800-423-3015, ext. 651; Bak@AquafineUV.com.
David Witham is vice president of new technology at UltraViolet Devices, Inc. where he has been since 1996. Previously, he was director of engineering. He is responsible for developing UV technology, intellectual property and new business opportunities. Witham has spent a large portion of the last three years in developing the application of UV in indoor air as well as special water applications and the development of modeling and software to assist in UV dosing and system design. He may be reached at 661-295-8140; davew@uvdi.com.

Activation Date: 
November 9, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12760