Membrane Filtration As an Alternative: Part 2

Part one of this article appeared in the July issue and discussed microfiltration and utrafiltration. This article discusses nanofiltration and reverse osmosis.

About The Author: 

Dr. Mohamed Lahlou is the technical assistance specialist for the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse. This article originally appeared as a tech brief for the NDWC.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11813

Membrane Filtration as an Alternative: Part 1

Once considered a viable technology only for desalination, membrane processes are increasingly employed for removal of bacteria and other microorganisms, particulate material and natural organic material that can impart color, tastes and odors to the water.

About The Author: 

Dr. Mohamed Lahlou is the technical assistance specialist for the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse. This article originally appeared as a tech brief for the NDWC.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11775

Legionella: Minimizing Risks

Legionellosis, the disease caused by Legionella spc., is common, though most people would guess it is extremely rare. Outbreaks of Legionellosis, defined as a cluster of three or more cases in a single locale, occur regularly in the United States and much of the developed world. Outbreaks have been reported in Australia, Holland, Thailand, Japan, England and many other countries. In the U.S., the Center for Disease Control (CDC) receives reports of 1,000 cases of Legionellosis annually.

About The Author: 

W. Craig Meyer is a professor of environmental sciences at Pierce College, Woodland Hills, California.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11799

A New Look at Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water

The application of disinfectants in drinking water treatment for controlling microbial quality has drawbacks. These include the formation of potentially harmful disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that can be potential carcinogens (e.g., trihalomethanes [THMs] when chlorine is used as a disinfectant). The general equation is:

 

ÊÊÊNOM + Disinfectant -> DBP

ÊÊÊWhere NOM = Natural Organic Matter

About The Author: 

Dr. Taha F. Marhaba is assistant professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). He is involved in drinking water research, more specifically disinfection and disinfection by-products. His recent research accomplishments were the development of the spectral fluorescent signatures (SFS) method for rapid determination of natural organic matter fractions in water. He is a registered professional engineer in the states of New Jersey and Delaware.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11528

Ultraviolet Technology: The Non-Chemical Alternative for Well Water Disinfection

As consumer awareness grows in regard to the quality of water consumed every day from the numerous well water systems across America, the process that is gaining the most attention is that of disinfection.

About The Author: 

Scott Russell is the residential products manager at Ideal Horizons. He has more than six years experience in residential UV applications with a strong technical background in both electrical and mechanical issues. Russell can be reached at Ideal Horizons, 212 Ideal Way Poultney, VT 05764; 802-287-4485; fax 802-287-4486; www.idealhorizons.com.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11490

Georgia Golf Course Greens Up With Ultraviolet Disinfection

The process of reusing wastewater for sprinkling at the Sugar Hill Golf Course in Gwinnett County, Georgia, was time consuming, costly and problematic. An in-line ultraviolet disinfection unit installed at the treatment plant solved the problem.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11463

Solid, Liquid or Gas: Which Form of Chlorine Is Best for Me?

There is no question that the use of chlorine offers you a highly effective way to purify water and wastewater. The only question is: Which form of chlorine should you use?

About The Author: 

Diane M. Haskett is president of Chlorinators, Inc. You may contact the company for complimentary technical bulletins at 561-288-4854; www.regalchlorinators.com.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11482

UV Disinfection 101

An overview of UV disinfection and its applications.

About The Author: 

This article was written by Edwin L. Roberts, director of sales and marketing of Hydrotech Inc., Valencia, California, 661-294-8888.<

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11350

Alternative Disinfection Technologies for Small Drinking Water Systems

An overview of an American Water Works Association Research Foundation project.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11309

Membrane Filtration for Water and Wastewater

Membrane filtration, widely used in chemical and biotechnology processes, is already established as a valuable means of filtering and cleaning wastewater and industrial process water.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11283