POU Faucet Selections

Faucets for point-of-use (POU) water treatment systems must combine an attractive, contemporary appearance with materials that ensure safety and purity. POU faucets and systems are becoming increasingly important to help meet consumer demands for safe, high-quality drinking water. It is estimated that by 2020 almost every household will have a POU or point-of-entry (POE) water treatment system.

About The Author: 

Gary M. Strunak is national sales manager for Tomlinson Industries' No-Drip product line. He is responsible for all No-Drip sales in the U.S. and Canada. He has been with Tomlinson since 1979. Tomlinson Industries has been a supplier to the bottled water industry since 1958. Strunak can be reached at 216.587.3400; fax 216.587.0733; gstrunak@tomlinsonind.com.

Publication Date: 
October 29, 2002
Activation Date: 
October 29, 2002
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13403

Zinc Coatings on Handrail Tubing: A Comparative Analysis

When applying zinc metal to steel handrail tubing for corrosion protection, batch hot-dip galvanizing and in-line, continuous galvanizing are the two most common methods. Understanding the metallurgy, bond strength, corrosion mechanisms and testing of these two galvanizing methods may lead to better design decisions for particular applications.

When applying zinc metal to steel handrail tubing for corrosion protection, batch hot-dip galvanizing and in-line, continuous galvanizing are the two most common methods.

About The Author: 

Philip G. Rahrig is the executive director for the American Galvanizers Association, Englewood, Colo.

Publication Date: 
August 5, 2002
Activation Date: 
August 5, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13245

Back to the Basics, Part 1

Basic water chemistry, terminology and applications can be very complicated and not seem so basic to individuals without a chemistry background. This series of articles will help shed light on the chemistry of water and the mysteries that it can contain, plus explain the technologies used to treat water so the purchaser can make an educated attempt to find the right solution for a particular application. There are no cut-and-dry formulas for water treatment and certainly no cure-all for every application or problem, but with an understanding of how water works and the technologies developed to treat water, a person can utilize his resources to come up with solutions for his particular need or application.

Deck: 

Brushing Up on Water Chemistry 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario, Canada.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13083

Making the Sale Using Certification to American National Standards

Dealers of drinking water treatment systems today enjoy a growing market of opportunity. However, accompanying this growth is increasing competition, a tightening economy and a far more informed consumer. All of these require dealers to find better ways to differentiate their products and services.

A presentation supported by third-party testing and certification will bring peace of mind to the buyer and dealers closer to the sale.

About The Author: 

Tom Bruursema is the general manager of the Drinking Water Treatment Unit Program and Environmental and Research Services. Bruursema has been employed by NSF for 16 years, serving in a number of technical and administrative positions. Bruursema is a member of the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Associaiton (past member of board of directors), National Environmental Health Association, Controlled Environment Testing Association (past member of board of directors), American Biological Safety Association, National Air Filtration Association and member of the Water Quality Association World Assembly Division Standards and Regulations Committee.

Publication Date: 
February 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12971

The State of Regulations

As the POU/POE water treatment industry progresses to new levels and meets new challenges, issues regarding regulations and standards continually arise. As the industry waits for the EPA and U.S. government to finalize regulations, the industry is forced to ride out the MCL changes, rule withdrawals and estimated costs that each proposal brings. Listed here is a review of regulation changes the industry has seen in the last year and a brief look at which ones to watch for in the future.

Deck: 

Government Regulations and Safe Drinking Water Act Updates

Activation Date: 
August 10, 2001
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12531

Arsenic

On June 22, 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposed rule that would lower the current national primary drinking water standard for arsenic.

Deck: 

Addressing Arsenic Contamination Through Residential Drinking Water Treatment

About The Author: 

Jane Wilson, M.P.H., is senior project manager of standards at NSF International.

Activation Date: 
February 14, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12016

Certification Breaks Tough Competition

As Dotcom companies come and go faster than we can click the mouse to catch them, more and more employees of these companies are looking for more than just good pay — they seek what will benefit them in the future and, likely, at other companies.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11826

Business, Skills Training Are Never Ending

The rapid changes in technology are so prolific that it has forced us to become life-long learners. Rather than a rigidly structured process, learning is becoming a self-directed process.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11597

Distinguishing Between Certified & Non-Certified Water Filters

In the past year, manufacturers have begun advising consumers that the replacement elements they produce fit other manufacturers housings or pitchers and infer that the hybrid system will perform as well as the original system. This, in NSF's opinion, is not truthful information to the consumer.One of the main purposes of the NSF International Drinking Water Treatment Unit Certification Program is to assure that a drinking water treatment system performs in the marketplace as tested and certified by NSF.

Deck: 

The NSF Certification claims for a water filtration system are null and void when a component is placed in another housing

About The Author: 

Nancy Culotta is general manager of the Drinking Water Treatment Unit Certification Program at NSF International, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
10569

Rethinking ANSI/NSF Standard 58

As the organization that develops and maintains the consensus standards for the point-of-use, point-of-entry drinking water treatment unit industry, it is sometimes difficult to admit that the standards development process is not always perfect. Sometimes, as was recently revealed by NSF during a complaint investigation, there is a provision in the current standard which may not be technically accurate.

Deck: 

The Joint Committee voted to remove the arsenic reduction claim from Standard 58 until a new test method is developed

About The Author: 

Nancy Culotta is general manager of the Drinking Water Treatment Units division of NSF Intl.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
10468