The Science Behind the Standards

There is a buzz of excitement throughout the industry surrounding the Water Quality Assn.’s (WQA) Sustainability Standards. The development of these standards was sparked by the WQA board of governors, which tasked the association with finding a proactive way to promote sustainability and environmental awareness across the entire drinking water treatment sector. This torch was eagerly taken up by industry volunteers, with task force ranks eventually growing to represent more than 50 WQA members and stakeholders.

Deck: 

The life-cycle approach to creating sustainability standards

About The Author: 

Stuart Mann, CWS-VI, is sustainability certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Mann can be reached at smann@wqa.org or 630.929.2546.
Eric Yeggy, CWS-VI, is program development manager for the Water Quality Assn. Yeggy can be reached at eyeggy@wqa.org or 630.929.2539.

Publication Date: 
January 16, 2014
Activation Date: 
January 16, 2014
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Wag the Dog

The company I went to work for when I first came into the water industry 15 years ago had a management turnover problem. Sales managers would rarely last longer than six months before they either were fired or became frustrated with the position and left of their own accord. Often it was a race to see which happened first.

Deck: 

Creating accountability to ensure a successful business

About The Author: 

Kelly R. Thompson, CWS VI, CI, is president of Moti-Vitality LLC. Thompson can be reached at kellyt@moti-vitality.com or 810.560.2788.

Publication Date: 
December 5, 2013
Activation Date: 
December 5, 2013
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Rock On With Certified Systems

It’s a lazy Saturday morning at the Unger house. Mom is at work, and she left me and the kids (ages 11, nine, seven and five) a giant list of chores to complete while she is away. The problem is, we do not have much enthusiasm or energy to get them done — so what do we do?

Deck: 

Understanding the science behind heavy metal filtration certification

About The Author: 

Mark T. Unger, CWS-VI, is technical and training manager for the Water Quality Assn. Unger can be reached at munger@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
October 17, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 17, 2013
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A Bang for Your Co-Op Buck

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a co-op, or cooperative, is an enterprise or organization owned by and operated for the benefit of those using its services. As a business owner using a co-op for advertising, it is not always easy to maximize your benefits. There often are regulations to follow, including which logo sizes and media to use, plus exclusivity if you want to get the full financial reimbursement for your effort. Then, when you fulfill all the requirements, you still only receive 50% of your advertising spend.

Deck: 

Strategic ways to optimize your co-op funding

About The Author: 

Shannon Good is president of the Good Marketing Group. Good can be reached at sgood@goodgroupllc.com or 484.902.8914.

Publication Date: 
October 17, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 17, 2013
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Not So Rock 'n' Roll

At first glance, this issue of Water Quality Products might seem to have a rock ‘n’ roll theme, with phrases like “rock on” and “heavy metal” peppering the article titles — but unfortunately the issue at hand is anything but rock ‘n’ roll.

The focus of these articles is heavy metals, contaminants that lately have been making more waves than usual within the industry. Between the quickly approaching deadline for the new federal low-lead law and the recent release of California’s proposed chromium-6 limit, it is one that will continue to be a concern.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Battle of the Disinfectants

Chlorine is and has been the No. 1 disinfectant used by water treatment systems throughout the world for more than 100 years. Currently, a majority of municipal water systems use chlorine to disinfect their drinking water. Recently, though, concerns over chlorine’s limitations have emerged, and research into alternative disinfectants is ongoing.

Deck: 

New disinfection options may provide alternatives to traditional chlorine

About The Author: 

Dean Jarog is laboratory analyst for the Water Quality Assn. Jarog can be reached at djarog@wqa.org or 630.929.2544

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
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Diving Into Disease

Reading the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Web pages on recreational water illnesses (RWIs) is enough to make someone never want set foot in a swimming pool again. From the list of pathogens that can cause RWIs (which includes some nasty fellows, such as Cryptosporidium, Legionella, E. coli and more) to statistics on sources of disease (“on average, people have about 0.14 grams of feces on their bottoms”), the cringe factor is high.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 547.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
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The Journey to Sustainability

As concern for the environment moves ever closer to the forefront of public and media attention, the water treatment industry has been subjected to criticism. Reverse osmosis (RO) systems and softeners have been accused of wasting water and contributing to salinity problems, and producers of bottled water vie with filter manufacturers over which option is greener.

Deck: 

New standards provide sustainability certification for carbon products

About The Author: 

Stuart Mann, CWS-VI, is sustainability certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Mann can be reached at smann@wqa.org or 630.929.2546.

Publication Date: 
May 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
May 3, 2013
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Dried Out

The view out my window as I write is white — the snow is falling quickly and heavily, with up to 8 in. expected by the end of the day. Schools are closed and the chatter around the office is whether the commute home will take two hours or three.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
March 29, 2013
Activation Date: 
March 29, 2013
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Picking Plastic for Pipe

When choosing pipe or fittings for any water application, the material options can be overwhelming. This was not always the case, though: For centuries, most pipe was made of lead or wood. In fact, the word plumbing is derived from the Latin word for lead, plumbum.  Although the mechanical properties of lead are advantageous for making pipe, its toxicity is an issue. Wood pipe, on the other hand, is nontoxic, but susceptible to leaks. And because wood is soft, people could easily drill into the pipe and steal water.    

Deck: 

Evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of plastic pipe varieties

About The Author: 

Amanda Fisher, CWS-VI, is product certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Fisher can be reached at afisher@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
March 20, 2013
Activation Date: 
March 20, 2013
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