Not So Rock 'n' Roll

At first glance, this issue of Water Quality Products might seem to have a rock ‘n’ roll theme, with phrases like “rock on” and “heavy metal” peppering the article titles — but unfortunately the issue at hand is anything but rock ‘n’ roll.

The focus of these articles is heavy metals, contaminants that lately have been making more waves than usual within the industry. Between the quickly approaching deadline for the new federal low-lead law and the recent release of California’s proposed chromium-6 limit, it is one that will continue to be a concern.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
October 16, 2013
Activation Date: 
October 16, 2013
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Battle of the Disinfectants

Chlorine is and has been the No. 1 disinfectant used by water treatment systems throughout the world for more than 100 years. Currently, a majority of municipal water systems use chlorine to disinfect their drinking water. Recently, though, concerns over chlorine’s limitations have emerged, and research into alternative disinfectants is ongoing.

Deck: 

New disinfection options may provide alternatives to traditional chlorine

About The Author: 

Dean Jarog is laboratory analyst for the Water Quality Assn. Jarog can be reached at djarog@wqa.org or 630.929.2544

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
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Diving Into Disease

Reading the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Web pages on recreational water illnesses (RWIs) is enough to make someone never want set foot in a swimming pool again. From the list of pathogens that can cause RWIs (which includes some nasty fellows, such as Cryptosporidium, Legionella, E. coli and more) to statistics on sources of disease (“on average, people have about 0.14 grams of feces on their bottoms”), the cringe factor is high.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 547.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
June 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
June 3, 2013
Issue Reference: 

The Journey to Sustainability

As concern for the environment moves ever closer to the forefront of public and media attention, the water treatment industry has been subjected to criticism. Reverse osmosis (RO) systems and softeners have been accused of wasting water and contributing to salinity problems, and producers of bottled water vie with filter manufacturers over which option is greener.

Deck: 

New standards provide sustainability certification for carbon products

About The Author: 

Stuart Mann, CWS-VI, is sustainability certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Mann can be reached at smann@wqa.org or 630.929.2546.

Publication Date: 
May 3, 2013
Activation Date: 
May 3, 2013
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Dried Out

The view out my window as I write is white — the snow is falling quickly and heavily, with up to 8 in. expected by the end of the day. Schools are closed and the chatter around the office is whether the commute home will take two hours or three.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
March 29, 2013
Activation Date: 
March 29, 2013
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Picking Plastic for Pipe

When choosing pipe or fittings for any water application, the material options can be overwhelming. This was not always the case, though: For centuries, most pipe was made of lead or wood. In fact, the word plumbing is derived from the Latin word for lead, plumbum.  Although the mechanical properties of lead are advantageous for making pipe, its toxicity is an issue. Wood pipe, on the other hand, is nontoxic, but susceptible to leaks. And because wood is soft, people could easily drill into the pipe and steal water.    

Deck: 

Evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of plastic pipe varieties

About The Author: 

Amanda Fisher, CWS-VI, is product certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Fisher can be reached at afisher@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
March 20, 2013
Activation Date: 
March 20, 2013
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New Year, New Initiatives

The Water Quality Assn.’s (WQA) Gold Seal product certification program continues to grow and expand to meet the needs of the industry. This is being accomplished while maintaining quality control procedures and customer service. Regulatory acceptance of Gold Seal certification has reached a new high with the addition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Energy Star program, which is now accepting the Gold Seal program for compliance of water coolers.  

Deck: 

WQA prepares for new and ongoing ventures in 2013

About The Author: 

Tom Palkon, CWS-VI, is director of product certification for the Water Quality Assn. Palkon can be reached at tpalkon@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
February 5, 2013
Activation Date: 
February 5, 2013
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Banning the Bottle

As usual, when we rang in the New Year last month, new rules and regulations took effect — including several concerning the sale of bottled water.

The battle over bottled water can be quite divisive. Its proponents argue that it is a convenient and healthy way to stay hydrated. Its detractors argue that it is expensive and leads to more waste in landfills.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
February 4, 2013
Activation Date: 
February 4, 2013
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Commercial Compliance

Residential drinking water treatment products have a plethora of standards and protocols available to demonstrate that they have been tested and certified to ensure that the materials that come into contact with drinking water are not harmful, the products are structurally sound and the performance reduction claims are accurate. Commercial products were left in the dust, however, and end users do not have a significant amount of guidance within the standards to make the same distinctions about these larger systems.

Deck: 

Certification options for commercial treatment systems

About The Author: 

Tina Donda is product certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at tfischer@wqa.org or 630.929.2533.

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013
Activation Date: 
January 8, 2013
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Marketing Myth Shakedown

Whether it is search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO) or website design, there are many myths about Internet marketing that just do not hold up to testing. Let's tackle the top 18.

Keep in mind these myths are for service-based small businesses with the primary goal of generating leads.

Myth #1: You need to be No. 1 on Google. In reality, the cost per click to be No. 1 in paid advertising for all pertinent keywords is generally not cost-effective.

Deck: 

A look at the most common online marketing misconceptions

About The Author: 

Bryan Trilli is team leader for Optimized Marketing. Trilli can be reached at bryan@optimized-marketing.com or 919.789.1888.

Publication Date: 
November 29, 2012
Activation Date: 
November 29, 2012
Issue Reference: 
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