Certifying for Contaminant Reduction

Heptachlor epoxide, trichloroethane, aesthetic chlorine, acrylonitrile, TDS, xylenes, lead, arsenic, hexachlorocyclopentadiene … Certainly, some of the chemicals listed above are recognizable not only to you but also to the average consumer. Some of them are recognizable to you, but the average consumer would stumble through their pronunciation. Should you consider certifying the contaminants listed above?

Contaminant Reduction

Deck: 

Deciding which contaminant reduction claims to certify

About The Author: 

Tina Fischer is product certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Fischer can be reached at 630.505.0160 or by e-mail at tfischer@wqa.org.

Publication Date: 
June 1, 2010
Activation Date: 
June 1, 2010
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Reducing Costs for Reducing Arsenic

“Arsenic Found in Groundwater.” How many times have you seen that headline? There is no doubt that arsenic has become a common household term, used not only by teenagers studying the periodic table but also by adults who have long forgotten their high school chemistry classes.

In the last 10 years, arsenic has made headlines for various reasons. Most deal with human exposure and its associated risks.  

Arsenic is present in natural deposits in the earth. It can enter drinking water supplies from these deposits or from agricultural and industrial activities.

Deck: 

Developing less expensive POE systems for arsenic treatment

About The Author: 

Brian Donda is Gold Seal and exhibit sales manager for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at bdonda@wqa.org or 630.929.2527.

Publication Date: 
April 25, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 25, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Communication: The Critical Factor

When we consider the common cause of business challenges in most circumstances, it often comes down to communication—or the lack thereof. The failure of many business relationships or initiatives is the result of poor communication. Whether one is selling or managing, good communication skills are critical.

Having Influence

Deck: 

Influence customers with a message that inspires

About The Author: 

Ric Harry is a sales, management and technical consultant for the water treatment industry. Harry can be reached at richarry@cogeco.ca or 905.734.7756.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 

An Uncertain Verdict

Worries about toxins are all around us. It seems that everyday, news stories report a new chemical threat in the clothes we wear, the air we breathe, the water we drink or the bottles we drink it out of. These emerging contaminants seem to be popping up all over the place. But what about chemicals we have known about for years—especially the ones we intentionally put in our drinking water?

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23267

Aging Out

Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it had worked with three New Jersey school districts to successfully lower lead levels in their drinking water. Testing in 2010 and 2011 found elevated lead levels in approximately 8% of the outlets it tested at the Atlantic City, Union City and Weehawken school districts. The districts resolved the problem through a variety of methods, from filtration to replacing fixtures to simply shutting off those outlets. The latest round of testing showed that lead levels were within acceptable EPA limits.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor for Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
February 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23232

Becoming the Expert

In December, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration announced that as a part of a collaboration, a new high-speed robotic screening system would begin testing a library of 10,000 compounds for potential toxicity.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
January 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
January 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23189

Braving the Storm

The past year was a rough one for businesses in the U.S. and around the world. The economy continues to weigh heavily on everyone’s minds. This year, Water Quality Products conducted its fifth annual State of the Industry Survey to find out how the economy affected the water treatment industry. Once again, readers indicated that the down economy and depressed housing market were the factors that most negatively affected sales  in the last year

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at 847.391.1007 or by e-mail at kcline@sgcmail.com.

Activation Date: 
November 30, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23146

A Growing Focus on Groundwater

In recent days, groundwater has been gaining attention. Increased hydraulic fracturing operations have caused controversy over potential methane gas contamination. Reports indicate that groundwater aquifers, especially in the drought-prone southwestern U.S., are being depleted more quickly than they can be recharged. Surveys, like the one recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reveal that contaminants such as arsenic are widespread in the nation’s water wells.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23116

Emergency Preparedness

As I write this, the U.S. is in the wake of two natural disasters: the earthquake that rocked the East Coast on Aug. 23 and Hurricane Irene, which spun its way from the Carolinas to Canada just a few days later.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23087

A Win for Water Quality

The country of Ghana recently announced a health victory—on July 28, it declared that it had eradicated the Guinea worm, a devilish parasite that is contracted by consuming unclean water containing microscopic water fleas that carry its eggs. In the 1980s, former President Jimmy Carter visited the country and witnessed a woman afflicted with the disease. (I will spare you the details of the parasite’s life cycle—suffice to say it is disturbing and extremely painful. Google at your own risk.) Appalled by what he saw, he took on the cause of eradicating the Guinea worm in Ghana.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
September 21, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23026