Monitoring Drinking Water Regulation Updates

The Water Quality Association (WQA) and the point-of-use/point-of-entry (POU/POE) industry as a whole face the usual list of federal and state regulatory challenges in 2002-2003.

Deck: 

The point-of-use and point-of-entry water treatment industry experienced several changes in standards and regulations.

About The Author: 

Carlyn Meyer is the director of public affairs for the Water Quality Association, Lisle, Ill. For additional information, visit www.wqa.org; 630-505-0160.

Activation Date: 
July 30, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13237

Arsenic in Drinking Water - Part 4

Editor’s Note: Part 1 of this series provided a timeline for the development of a drinking water standard for arsenic. It also summarized the political and public reactions to the U.S. EPA decision to delay and withdraw the arsenic rule.

Part 2 dealt with human exposure and advances in knowledge concerning human health effects of exposure to arsenic.

Part 3 summarized early data on the occurrence of arsenic in U.S. waters.

Deck: 

Arsenic Removal Methods

About The Author: 

John T. O’Connor, EngD, P.E., is CEO of H2O’C
Engineering, Columbia, Mo. Phone 877-22-WATER; e-mail: john@h2oc.com.

Activation Date: 
June 5, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13138

Evaluating Activated Carbons

New
challenges are emerging in the industry that require new methods and product
developments. This article discusses additional test methods for the AC
industry.

Deck: 

ASTM, AWWA and EPA Standard Methods and New Test Methods for AC

About The Author: 

Henry G. Nowicki, Ph.D. and MBA, directs the PACS Laboratory testing and consulting services and new business developments at PACS. He has obtained three patents and published more than 100 articles about environmental issues and AC adsorption and has been an expert witness in more than 30 legal cases. Dr. Nowicki may be reached at hnpacs@aol.com; www.pacslabs.com.

Mick Greenbank, Ph.D., is a surface chemist with 23 years of
varied experiences in AC and holds seven patents. He directs new test methods
development and application and provides special projects, consulting and
training for PACS. Dr. Greenbank teaches “Selecting the Best Activated
Carbon for the Application,” a PACS shortcourse. He may be reached at
mickpacs@aol.com.

Homer Yute is a mathematics and computer programming expert
who has developed seven software programs for the AC industry.

All authors may be reached at PACS, Inc., 409 Meade Dr.,
Coraopolis, PA 15108; 724-457-6576.

Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13128

Arsenic in Drinking Water - Part 3

Only recently has a substantial amount of data become available on the concentrations of arsenic in United States drinking water supplies. Most of these data have been accumulated by the state regulatory agencies responsible for monitoring drinking waters. Since the arsenic standard has been 50 µg/L, some state agencies have recorded arsenic concentrations only in excess of that concentration. Others have been limited by the sensitivity of the analytical techniques and equipment used for the arsenic analysis. As a result, much of the available arsenic data are “below the limits of detection.

Deck: 

Occurrence of Arsenic in U.S. Waters

About The Author: 

John T. O’Connor, EngD, P.E., is CEO of H2O’C Engineering, Columbia, Mo. Phone 877-22-WATER; e-mail: john@h2oc.com.

Activation Date: 
May 6, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13091

Arsenic in Drinking Water - Part 2

On-going health effects studies and research reports (2001) appear to support the argument for lowering the current EPA drinking water standard for arsenic. Studies conducted by EPA, the University of North Carolina and the University of British Columbia have indicated that methylated metabolites of trivalent arsenic are genotoxic. In other words, they damage DNA in human cells.

Deck: 

Human Exposure and Health Effects

About The Author: 

John T. O’Connor, EngD, P.E., is CEO of H2O’C Engineering, Columbia, Mo. Phone 877-22-WATER; e-mail john@h2oc.com

Activation Date: 
March 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12992

Arsenic in Drinking Water - Part 1

The National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council (NAS-NRC) report was released on September 11, 2001. It concluded that the existing health effects data on arsenic essentially were sound. In addition, their review of three new epidemiological studies indicated that the health risks posed by arsenic in drinking water were greater than previously believed. As a result, in October, well before its self-imposed deadline, EPA rescinded its March implementation ban and endorsed the 10 µg/L arsenic MCL.

Deck: 

The Development of Drinking Water Regulations

About The Author: 

John T. O’Connor, EngD, P.E., is CEO of H2O’C Engineering, Columbia, Missouri. Phone 877-22-WATER email: john@h2oc.com

Activation Date: 
February 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12914

Only Time Will Tell

The unprecedented events of Sept. 11 and the recession that began hitting our nation at the beginning of 2001 created havoc in the business world. The water industry was no exception; it also saw its share of fluctuation. With such an unpredictable economy, we move into 2002. WQP asked industry professionals nationwide to comment on what the water industry may see in the upcoming year. Although these professionals share their outlooks for next year, only time will tell what lies ahead.

Deck: 

2002 Industry Predictions

Publication Date: 
January 1, 2002
Activation Date: 
January 1, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12832

POU Options for Arsenic

The topic of arsenic has received a lot of press coverage this year, ever since the Bush administration halted the EPA’s newly issued maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 parts per billion (ppb). Since then, the MCL was reinstated back to 50 ppb and further discussions and studies have continued. This article will discuss some of these updates.

Deck: 

How to Select from Available Treatment Options

About The Author: 

Contributed by Apyron Technologies.

Activation Date: 
November 9, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12759

Judicial Equities Override Filtration Requirement

A recent federal court decision may have created an opportunity for relief from United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules that impose costs that substantially exceed benefits.

Deck: 

October 2001 Legal Stream

About The Author: 

Dan Kucera is a partner in the law firm of Chapman and Cutler, 111 W. Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois 60603–4080, (312) 845–3000.

Activation Date: 
October 19, 2001
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12704

Water Tests Protect Customers From Guilty Parties

Despite the regulations set for treatment plants, the general public will find itself focusing on the negative and seeking additional treatment from our industry. This spells opportunity for water treatment dealers to illustrate how their services can benefit the public.

I’ve been thinking about the numerous Clean Water Act (CWA) violations we read about — too many to keep up on.

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is editor of Water Quality Products.

Publication Date: 
September 11, 2001
Activation Date: 
September 11, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12619