POU Options for Arsenic

The topic of arsenic has received a lot of press coverage this year, ever since the Bush administration halted the EPA’s newly issued maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 parts per billion (ppb). Since then, the MCL was reinstated back to 50 ppb and further discussions and studies have continued. This article will discuss some of these updates.

Deck: 

How to Select from Available Treatment Options

About The Author: 

Contributed by Apyron Technologies.

Activation Date: 
November 9, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12759

Judicial Equities Override Filtration Requirement

A recent federal court decision may have created an opportunity for relief from United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules that impose costs that substantially exceed benefits.

Deck: 

October 2001 Legal Stream

About The Author: 

Dan Kucera is a partner in the law firm of Chapman and Cutler, 111 W. Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois 60603–4080, (312) 845–3000.

Activation Date: 
October 19, 2001
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12704

Water Tests Protect Customers From Guilty Parties

Despite the regulations set for treatment plants, the general public will find itself focusing on the negative and seeking additional treatment from our industry. This spells opportunity for water treatment dealers to illustrate how their services can benefit the public.

I’ve been thinking about the numerous Clean Water Act (CWA) violations we read about — too many to keep up on.

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is editor of Water Quality Products.

Publication Date: 
September 11, 2001
Activation Date: 
September 11, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12619

Testing Bottled Water

One of the most important (and sometimes the most complex) area of the bottled water business is compliance with federal, state and industry regulations. As the EPA continues to evaluate contaminants in drinking water for regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the FDA must review these regulations for their suitability for bottled water.

Deck: 

Continually Evolving Regulations for D/DBPs

About The Author: 

Barbara L. Marteney and Kristin M. Safran of National Testing Laboratories, Ltd. specialize in consulting with bottled water companies regarding testing requirements. They maintain contacts with bottled water regulators, industry associations and the FDA regarding regulatory changes and bottled water issues. They have authored numerous articles and given presentations regarding state, federal and international bottled water regulations.

Marteney and Safran can be reached by phone at 800-458-3330 or 440-449-2525 (Marteney, ext. 217; Safran, ext. 215); food-bev@watercheck.com.

Activation Date: 
September 11, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12616

The State of Regulations

As the POU/POE water treatment industry progresses to new levels and meets new challenges, issues regarding regulations and standards continually arise. As the industry waits for the EPA and U.S. government to finalize regulations, the industry is forced to ride out the MCL changes, rule withdrawals and estimated costs that each proposal brings. Listed here is a review of regulation changes the industry has seen in the last year and a brief look at which ones to watch for in the future.

Deck: 

Government Regulations and Safe Drinking Water Act Updates

Activation Date: 
August 10, 2001
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12531

Flexible Monitoring System Helps Ohio Company Meet Daily EPA Measurement Requirements

An Ohio utility company provides water plant operator services to facilities throughout the state, including several very large travel center operations. Daily monitoring became time consuming and costly, so they sought a more efficient solution by investigating plant monitoring systems.

Activation Date: 
May 21, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12348

Volatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water

When addressing water treatment needs, the average person usually wants to remedy his water of items that cause laundry stains, unpleasant "egg-like" or musty odors and buildup on pipes and fixtures. While the contaminants that cause these problems certainly present legitimate reasons for treatment, it is the "silent" contaminants in our drinking water that cause the most problems with everyday health.

About The Author: 

Marianne R. Metzger and Tami E. Castelli, technical support and account managers with National Testing Laboratories, Ltd. since 1997, service companies such as water treatment equipment manufacturers and dealers, well drillers, contractors, engineers and consultants in the water industry. Metzger has degrees in both environmental geology and political science and Castelli has degrees in both biology and general science studies.
Both serve on Water Quality Association committees and have authored numerous articles for industry publications.

Publication Date: 
March 14, 2001
Activation Date: 
March 14, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12209

Oxidizing Arsenic III to Arsenic V for Better Removal

On June 22, 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed lowering the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic from 50 down to 5 micrograms/L (Federal Register, 2000).

About The Author: 

Dr. Dennis Clifford, P.E., is a professor of environmental engineering and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston. He has more than 30 years experience in teaching, research and consulting related to water and soil treatment. During the last 20 years, he and his students have extensively researched the subject of arsenic speciation, oxidation and treatment.

Ganesh Ghurye received his master’s degree in environmental engineering from the University of Houston, where he currently is a researcher in the area of water treatment. He has five years experience in developing arsenic treatment methods.

Activation Date: 
March 14, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12210

Arsenic

On June 22, 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposed rule that would lower the current national primary drinking water standard for arsenic.

Deck: 

Addressing Arsenic Contamination Through Residential Drinking Water Treatment

About The Author: 

Jane Wilson, M.P.H., is senior project manager of standards at NSF International.

Activation Date: 
February 14, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12016

Roundtable Discussion: E. coli (Escherichia coli)

Escherichia coli, a.k.a. E. coli. A terrible, but familiar word to the public suggests sewage or animal waste contamination. E.

Deck: 

Recent outbreaks of E. coli have brought consumer’s attention to their drinking water. Understanding its source, regulations and prevention will be key to combating this waterborne illness

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is the editor of Water Quality Products magazine.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11900