Banning the Bottle

As usual, when we rang in the New Year last month, new rules and regulations took effect — including several concerning the sale of bottled water.

The battle over bottled water can be quite divisive. Its proponents argue that it is a convenient and healthy way to stay hydrated. Its detractors argue that it is expensive and leads to more waste in landfills.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
February 4, 2013
Activation Date: 
February 4, 2013
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Lapwai School District to Clean Up Inactive Drywell

Source: 
U.S.
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EPA orders cleanup to protect nearby public drinking water wells

The Lapwai School District in Lapwai, Idaho, must clean up an inactive drywell contaminated with solvents (trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) to protect nearby public drinking water wells. The cleanup will be conducted under a legal order issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The drywell lies under an asphalt parking lot at the Lapwai School District bus maintenance facility (204 District Road in Lapwai), which is separated from the Lapwai Elementary School by a fence. Two drinking water wells are located about 150 ft northwest of the drywell.

Publication Date: 
January 23, 2013

EPA Concludes Consumer Confidence Report Rule Review

Source: 
U.S. EPA
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Electronic report delivery now available

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has completed its review of the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule and has concluded that drinking water utilities can provide reports about drinking water quality to customers via e-mail or on the Internet instead of mailing a copy of the report. Electronic delivery of these reports, which utilities are required to provide to their customers each year under the Safe Drinking Water Act, is expected to help utilities improve transparency and save resources.

Publication Date: 
January 9, 2013

Working for Efficiency

Last fall, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) WaterSense program introduced several new actions to help businesses, organizations and homeowners save water. WQP Assistant Editor Williette Nyanue spoke with Veronica Blette, WaterSense program manager, to learn about the new initiatives and the benefits of water efficiency.

Williette Nyanue: Tell us about the new workplace best management practices (BMPs) and the new specifications for apartments and condos.

About The Author: 

Veronica Blette is program manager for WaterSense. Blette can be reached at watersense@epa.gov.

Williette Nyanue is assistant editor for Water Quality Products. Nyanue can be reached at wnyanue@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7922.

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013
Activation Date: 
January 8, 2013
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Commercial Compliance

Residential drinking water treatment products have a plethora of standards and protocols available to demonstrate that they have been tested and certified to ensure that the materials that come into contact with drinking water are not harmful, the products are structurally sound and the performance reduction claims are accurate. Commercial products were left in the dust, however, and end users do not have a significant amount of guidance within the standards to make the same distinctions about these larger systems.

Deck: 

Certification options for commercial treatment systems

About The Author: 

Tina Donda is product certification supervisor for the Water Quality Assn. Donda can be reached at tfischer@wqa.org or 630.929.2533.

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013
Activation Date: 
January 8, 2013
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The Road Ahead

With another year on the books, it is time to look ahead to 2013. As always, the water treatment industry will face a variety of challenges and opportunities in the coming months. Domestically, new regulations loom — some positive, some negative — as California continues to set the legislative tone for the nation. Globally, opportunties await for companies ready to take the international plunge, but the challenges of certification remain.

Deck: 

Industry experts weigh in on what is to come in 2013

About The Author: 

Dave Haataja is executive director for the Water Quality Assn. Haataja can be reached at dhaataja@wqa.org or 630.505.0160.

Rick Andrew is general manager, Drinking Water Treatment Unit Program, for NSF Intl. Andrew can be reached at andrew@nsf.org or 734.913.5757.

Frank A. Brigano, Ph.D., is vice president, technology, for KX Technologies LLC. Brigano can be reached at fbrigano@kxtech.com or 203.764.2506.

Frank Panzeca is president of Culligan of Wheaton. Panzeca can be reached at fpanzeca@culliganwheaton.com or 630.668.4100.

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013
Activation Date: 
January 8, 2013
Issue Reference: 

Opportunity for Change

Change — it’s one of the few things we can count on, day in and day out. These days, change seems to happen at the speed of light, and while it may seem overwhelming, the many opportunities it brings also can be exhilarating. 2013 is poised to bring a wave of changes to the water treatment industry — and with it, a range of possibilities for those ready to grab them.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor for Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013
Activation Date: 
January 8, 2013
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EPA Issues Amendment to Record of Decision for Superfund Site

Source: 
U.S. EPA
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Amendment changes the remedy for soil and groundwater contamination at 10th Street Site

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 has issued an amendment to the Record of Decision (ROD) for the 10th Street Superfund Site in Columbus, Neb. EPA signed the ROD for the site in February 1995 to address groundwater contamination. The selected remedy for the 1995 ROD was sampling of municipal and monitoring wells and institutional controls to limit exposure to contamination from the site.

Site activities in 2000 and 2001 led to a final ROD issued in 2005. The final ROD selected the following remedies:

Publication Date: 
January 8, 2013

Safe Water Advocates Applaud Revised Drinking Water Rule

Source: 
American Water Works Assn.
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Drinking water providers expressed support for the Revised Total Coliform Rule

A diverse group of drinking water providers and environmental and health organizations applauded the announcement of a revised rule to safeguard U.S. drinking water.

A pre-publication copy of the final Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) was released Dec. 20, 2012, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and will be published in the Federal Register in the next few weeks. Significant improvements were made during the revision process, including new requirements that ensure assessment and corrective action when monitoring results indicate a potential risk of contamination.

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Publication Date: 
December 24, 2012

EPA Releases Update on Hydraulic Fracturing Study

Source: 
U.S. EPA
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The update outlines work currently underway, including the status of research projects

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided an update on its ongoing national study currently underway to better understand any potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. Results of the study, which Congress requested EPA to complete, are expected to be released in a draft for public and peer review in 2014.  The update outlines work currently underway, including the status of research projects that will inform the final study.

Publication Date: 
December 24, 2012
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EPA Releases Update on Hydraulic Fracturing Study