Ion Exchange Resins and Processes for Industrial Water Treatment

Let's take a closer look at the technology and operation of ion exchange resins and processes used today in industrial water treatment systems.

About The Author: 

Wayne Bernahl is president of W. Bernahl Enterprises, Ltd. He has worked in the industrial water treatment marketplace for 37 years. Most of this time was in technical marketing and consulting positions dealing with ion exchange and reverse osmosis applications.

Activation Date: 
June 27, 2003
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14224

Controlling Mechanisms of Contaminant Ion Leakage in Condensate Polishing Systems

Extracting the maximum benefit from condensate polishing systems continues to be a top priority among many electric utility plants. With cost reduction pressures and increasing water quality standards, owners and operators continue to evaluate the resin handling procedures that affect corrosion product transport and contaminant ion impurity levels.

About The Author: 

Stephen W. Najmy is a project manager for The Dow Chemical Co. He has worked in the technical service and development department for Dow Liquid Separations for the past 10 years. Much of his job focuses on the development of new resin products and procedures for condensate polishing systems. He is based at Larkin Laboratory in Midland, Mich.

Activation Date: 
September 11, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12618

Why Shouldn’t We Rebed This Ion Exchange Unit?

When approaching a rebed of an ion exchange unit it is important to determine if it is the best course of action, how you will remove the resin from the vessel and your plan to load the new resin.

Deck: 

Planning, Executing Your Resin Rebed Needs

About The Author: 

William J. Koebel is the Northeast sales manager for ResinTech, Inc., a supplier of ion exchange resins and granulated activated carbon.

Activation Date: 
February 14, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12019

Just the Facts: Knowing Strong Base Anion Resin Types

Deciding which type of strong base anion (SBA) resin to use in a deioinizing application does not have to be a guessing game. The following article reviews chemical property differences that exist in SBA resin and how these differences affect resin performance.Deciding which type of strong base anion (SBA) resin to use in a deioinizing application does not have to be a guessing game. In fact, selecting the correct SBA resin for your application can be simple as long as you know the facts about the resin and the circumstances in which they will be employed.

About The Author: 

Carl J. Galletti is the Midwest technical sales manager for ResinTech, a supplier of ion exchange resins and granulated activated carbon. He has worked within the chemical separation technology field for eleven years while at DuPont’s Biotechnology Division and ResinTech. Since joining ResinTech in 1992, Mr. Galletti has written articles on ion exchange and granulated activated carbon applications.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11711

Improving the Quality of Deionizers

Though both the cation and the anion resin are responsible for the quality of a deionization (DI) system effluent, it is the cation resin that is the big contributor to leakage. Improving the leakage characteristics of DI cation will reduce effluent conductivity, drop the pH and ultimately lead to better silica performance from the system.

About The Author: 

Jim Sabzali is the North American sales and marketing manager of The Purolite Co., Bala Cynwyd, Pa. Sabzali has 20 years of experience with synthetic resins and has been with Purolite since 1990. He can be reached at 800-343-1500; fax 610-668-3962; e-mail jsabzali@puroliteusa.com.

C.F. "Chubb" Michaud, CWS-VI, is technical director of the Systematix Co. of Placentia, Calif., which he founded in 1982. With more than 30 years of experience in water and fluid treatment, he is a member of the Water Quality Association's Ion Exchange Task Force and chairman of its subcommittee for component providers in the manufacturer/supplier section. Michaud can be reached at 714-993-2482; fax 714-528-2482; e-mail chubbh2o@aol.com.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11606

Guidelines for Cation Resin Replacement

This article discusses strong acid cation resin typically used in water softeners or as the first unit in a two-bed cation-anion demineralizer.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11436

Tannin Removal

Tannin removal is an application that some dealers have felt uncomfortable tackling. Tannins, until several years ago, were treated with standard strong base macroporous anion resins manufactured with styrene and divinylbenzene. This type of resin worked well in some areas but failed in other areas. Over the last five to 10 years resins have come into the residential water market that have been more successful and have made this water treatment problem more attractive to the water treatment dealer.

Deck: 

Tannin removal is an application that some dealers have felt uncomfortable tackling

About The Author: 

Mike Keller is with Sybron Chemicals Inc. He has been with the company for more than 10 years and holds an environmental science degtree from California University of Pennsylvania.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11284