Resin Sterilization

Ion exchange resin beds are often an attractive growth medium for biological organisms, such as bacteria, mold and algae. In some cases, these growths can build up in the resin bed and physically foul the resin. In most cases, however, the concern is that these organisms will contaminate the effluent water leaving the ion exchange system.

Deck: 

Effective methods for cleaning biologically fouled resin

Publication Date: 
March 1, 2006
Activation Date: 
March 1, 2006
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16786

Chromate

The Boomsnub site in the state of Washington was listed as a Superfund site in 1995. The site consists of two parcels of land, which previously contained two unrelated businesses that contributed separately to contamination of soil and groundwater.

The Boomsnub Metal Plating facility operated on about 0.5 acres, from 1967–1994. This facility was responsible for releases of chromium-contaminated wastes that resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater by hexivalent chrome.

Deck: 

Superfund site cleanup of chromate-contaminated groundwater

Publication Date: 
December 1, 2005
Activation Date: 
December 1, 2005
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16531

Uranium Removal by Ion Exchange

Higher pH solutions, through the addition or use of alkalis such as sodium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate or sodium carbonate, will result in severely decreased uranium regeneration.

Deck: 

Measures to reduce uranium in the drinking water supply

Publication Date: 
April 6, 2005
Activation Date: 
April 6, 2005
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16016

Ion Exchange Resins and Processes for Industrial Water Treatment

Let's take a closer look at the technology and operation of ion exchange resins and processes used today in industrial water treatment systems.

About The Author: 

Wayne Bernahl is president of W. Bernahl Enterprises, Ltd. He has worked in the industrial water treatment marketplace for 37 years. Most of this time was in technical marketing and consulting positions dealing with ion exchange and reverse osmosis applications.

Activation Date: 
June 27, 2003
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14224

Nitrate Removal by Ion Exchange

Nitrates have no detectable color, taste or smell at the concentrations involved in drinking water supplies, and they do not cause discoloration of plumbing fixtures, so they remain undetectable to our senses. Nitrate removal processes must be either foolproof or include extensive monitoring of the treated water to detect breakthrough or determine the need for regeneration.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2003
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2003
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13906
Email Subscriptions