New Filter Series Provide More Treatment Options

Publication Date: 
June 8, 2012

An alternative to small or inefficient or stainless steel housings, the Enpress Cartridge Tank offers extended life and service and a cost-effective and efficient filtration solution.

Company Reference: 

Filter Formula

In 2007, the NSF Intl. Drinking Water Treatment Unit Joint Committee revised the NSF/ANSI Standard 53 protocol for pH 8.5 lead reduction based on a substantial amount of research on particulate and colloidal lead. The research conducted by the NSF task group revealed a great deal of inconsistency in the amount of particulate lead formed from batch to batch and from laboratory to laboratory due to the precipitation of this element from the solution.

Deck: 

Testing and developing a lead-reduction filter for gravity pitchers

About The Author: 

Frank A. Brigano, Ph.D., is vice president technology of KX Technologies LLC. Brigano can be reached at fbrigano@kxtech.com or 203.764.2506.

Andrew Lombardo is senior research engineer for KX Technologies LLC. Lombardo can be reached at alombardo
@kxtech.com or 203.764.2525.

Publication Date: 
May 30, 2012
Activation Date: 
May 30, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Extending Resin Life

Water softener resin is extremely porous, which is beneficial because it allows for more surface area to capture calcium and other metals in source water. Surprisingly, 99% of ion exchange actually happens in the interior of the bead. Resin beads, ranging in size from 16 to 50 mesh, are abused daily during the backwash process and by contaminants in the source water. Resin could last much longer in these hostile environments with a few fairly inexpensive solutions.

Resin Basics

Deck: 

Cleaning options to reduce resin fouling

About The Author: 

Justin Ramsey is marketing manager for Pro Products LLC. Ramsey can be reached at jramsey@proproducts.com
or 800.285.9176.

Publication Date: 
May 30, 2012
Activation Date: 
May 30, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Performance Testing for Media & Systems

The most common question from customers of water treatment systems utilizing adsorbent media is, “How long will the media/system perform?” The most common answer may be a number of months or years but should be more elaborative than a mere number. The most honest answer is, “It depends on the water chemistry.”

Deck: 

New test improves prediction of system and media performance

About The Author: 

James Knoll is MetSorb commercial manager for Graver Technologies LLC. Knoll can be reached at jknoll@gravertech.com or 800.249.1990.

Publication Date: 
October 1, 2010
Activation Date: 
October 1, 2010
Issue Reference: 

Granular Activated Carbon Not Working?

Ever since granular adsorbent media such as bone char and granular activated carbon (GAC) replaced powdered activated carbon (PAC), the amount of air in a bed of dry GAC has adversely affected the performance of many adsorption systems. Too many operators of liquid phase adsorption systems are unaware of this property.

Deck: 

Addressing air in the bed of dry GAC

About The Author: 

Wayne Schuliger, P.E., is technical director for PACS Inc., and can be reached at wayne@pacslabs.com. Henry Nowicki, Ph.D./M.B.A., is president of PACS and Activated Carbon Services Inc. and can be reached at henry@pacslabs.com. H. George Nowicki, B.S., is laboratory manager and business developer for PACS and can be reached at george@pacslabs.com. Barbara Sherman, M.S., is manager of operations for PACS and can be reached at barb@pacslabs.com.

Publication Date: 
October 1, 2010
Activation Date: 
October 1, 2010
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Components

Environmental World Products focuses on component distribution, sourcing and new product development for commercial and industrial water treatment applications. Its product line includes RO system components, such as membrane housings, filter housings, bag housings, filter cartridges, couplings, control valves, flowmeters, solenoid valves, needle valves, controllers/monitors and pressure gauges.

Image: 

Filter Shells

Company Reference: 

New refillable filter shells feature a snap-fit end cap. The design requires no welding equipment or tools to seal the end cap. The durable shell construction and tight seal increase strength to resist cracking and prevent the end cap from popping out under high water pressure. It is designed to bear up under the high suction of vacuum-sealed packaging.

Image: 

Filters

Company Reference: 
Spotlight Name Archive: 
General
Legacy ID: 
61580
Spotlight Header Archive: 
March 2012

UFMC Series carbon wrap filters are cellulose free. Manufactured from carbon and polypropylene fibers, these filters will not harbor bacteria and other organics that are typical with cellulose-based filters. These cost-effective, single-stage cartridges are ideally suited for removal of sediments and reduction of unwanted taste, odor and chlorine from drinking water. They are available in 5, 10 and 20 microns in standard 2.6-in. and jumbo 4.5-in. OD diameters of 10- and 20-in. lengths.

Arsenic Free in Argentina

San Antonio de Los Cobres, a community of 6,000 residents in the Andes Mountains in Argentina, faced a challenging arsenic concentration of up to 290 ppb in its water supply. It needed a solution to reduce the level to below the maximum contaminant level set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 10 ppb.

Health Risks

Deck: 

Remote Andean town reduces arsenic with new treatment system

About The Author: 

Esmeralda Bonilla is Latin America business manager for AdEdge Water Technologies LLC. Bonilla can be reached at ebonilla@adedgetechnologies.com or 866.823.3343.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 

Finding a Way

In many developing areas in Africa, accessing clean drinking water is a serious challenge for thousands of communities. The only sources of water available to their residents often are overrun with bacteria, waste and harmful contaminants. Many times, a family’s only way to obtain potable water is to walk long distances to the nearest well or other groundwater source. Such a task has several adverse effects, particularly on women and children, who may spend much of their time retrieving low-quality water for their families instead of attending school.

Deck: 

Nonprofit organizations work to provide clean water in Africa

About The Author: 

Raissa Rocha is contributing editor for Water Quality Products. Rocha can be reached at rrocha@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7915.

Publication Date: 
April 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 24, 2012
Issue Reference: