Filtration Fundamentals

Over the years, water quality has noticeably deteriorated worldwide. This decline in water quality stems from the extreme demand on very limited natural resources. Various principles of filtration are used in many applications to improve the general quality of the water that is being treated. Along with screen filters, coagulation/filtration, neutralizing filters, oxidizing filters, clairifying filters and carbon filters are other treatment methods that may be used.

Deck: 

Various filter technologies stretch limited natural resources for drinking water

About The Author: 

Bill Kavey, CWS IV, is employed at Kavey Water Equipment Corp., which was acquired by Crane Environmental in January 2002. The merger combined Kavey's strength in pretreatment with Crane Environmental's manufacturing of small, medium and large reverse osmosis systems to provide more complete water purification solutions.

Publication Date: 
March 11, 2003
Activation Date: 
March 11, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13840

Zero Waste: A Look at the Future of Reverse Osmosis

Most reverse osmosis systems waste as much as 20 gallons just to produce one gallon of product water. The new technology called "ZeroWaste" eliminates this problem by returning the concentrate water from the reverse osmosis system back to the home's plumbing, resulting in 100 percent efficiency.

About The Author: 

Josh Hanford is the national sales manager for Watts Industries. He is the manager of new product development and serves on the Water Quality Association's RO Task Force.

Publication Date: 
March 11, 2003
Activation Date: 
March 11, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13839

Integrated Technology Simplifies Dewatering Process at Two Municipal STPs

The borough of West Mifflin, Penn., is a community located about nine miles southeast of downtown Pittsburgh. For years, the West Mifflin Sanitary Sewer Municipal Authority (WMSSMA) hauled liquid from its New England STP (a 1.2 mgd plant) to the Thompson Run facility (a 4.5 mgd plant), where it was processed on a belt press for dewatering. However, the hauling and associated labor proved very costly, and it was not always easy to coordinate dewatering schedules for both plants.
Additionally in the late 1990s, the WMSSMA faced a requirement to achieve higher cake solids and provide odor control that would respect nearby homes and businesses. Moreover, space constraints and staffing reductions necessitated a simple-to-operate installation.

Deck: 

Editorial Emphasis

About The Author: 

Robert W. (Bob) Mau is USFilter's municipal wastewater dewatering systems technical sales manager for the eastern United States. Mau joined USFilter in 1993 as southeast technical sales manager for both municipal and industrial applications. He has spent more than 30 years in the liquid filtration and sludge dewatering industry, and has held positions in product development, site testing, direct sales and sales management.
Dean Clemons is the operations manager for the West Mifflin Sanitary Sewer Municipal Authority. During his 32 years with the WMSSMA, Clemons has worked as plant operator at the Thompson Run and New England plants, plant mechanic, and belt filter press operator. He is certified by the State of Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Activation Date: 
February 21, 2003
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13782

Municipalities Tap into Benefits of EDR Water Treatment

No one wants to drink radium, nitrates or arsenic. However, if not for some technologically advanced methods of removing these contaminants, we all might be sipping on some very unhealthy water.

About The Author: 

Information for this article was contributed by Ionics, Inc., Watertown, Mass.

Activation Date: 
February 4, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13692

Point-of-Use Reverse Osmosis

As the residential point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) industry approaches its 35th anniversary, it is time for a reality check on the industry's progress to date as well as a look ahead to new technologies or improvements that the industry may introduce for POU RO systems in 2003.

Deck: 

Looking for Answers in 2003 and Beyond

About The Author: 

Tony Pagliaro is marketing manager at Nimbus Water Systems.

Activation Date: 
January 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13657

Arsenic Treatment Options for the Southwest

While high concentrations of arsenic are found mostly in the Western region of the United States, parts of the Midwest and New England show levels of arsenic
that exceed the newly approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 parts per billion (ppb). Individuals not willing to wait for their water system's compliance with the arsenic standard currently are looking for treatment systems to use in their homes. POU and even point-of-entry (POE) treatment systems are an attractive solution for these individuals. The process should begin with a basic understanding of arsenic contamination and the element's chemistry, a complete water quality analysis of the application-specific water and the knowledge of available technologies.

Activation Date: 
January 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13655

Dried Up: Raisin Producer's New Process Cuts Wastewater and Odors

Thanks to a new membrane filtration system, National Raisin Company, Fowler, Calif., not only has been able to cut its wastewater costs, but it also has opened up a potentially lucrative source of additional income.

About The Author: 

David Pearson is the general manager of PCI Membranes, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.

Activation Date: 
January 9, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13505

A New Option in Valve Actuators Strengthens Control of Filtering Operations

Water works engineers are now turning to a new generation of pneumatic valve actuators that are capable of executing the instructions of electronic control systems with the necessary precision to accurately control effluent flow. Surprisingly simple but rugged in construction, this new breed of actuators also is meeting the need to reduce downtime, as some of the first ones to debut in 1981 are still in operation without needing a spare (new) part.

Deck: 

Control Systems

About The Author: 

Information for this story was provided by K-Tork, Dallas, Texas.

Activation Date: 
January 9, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13504

Reverse Osmosis - Anion-Filtration Water Plant Run by a Single Automation Platform with Fieldbus Communications

A new 3.0 mgd water treatment plant on North Carolina's Cape Hatteras is believed to be the first in the United States to apply Foundation fieldbus for device-level control communications. The plant, built by the Dare County Water Department near the famous Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, has been operating without a problem since startup more than two years ago. Fieldbus has been widely applied in all process industries including electric power generation, an industry also cautious to adapt new technology.

About The Author: 

Robert Oreskovich is the director of the Dare County Water Department, Manteo, N.C.
John Contestable is the Frisco plant superintendent of the Dare County Water Department, Buxton, N.C.
Ken Flatt is the water systems analyses superintendent of the Dare County Water Department, Buxton, N.C.
Ian C. Watson, P.E., is president of RosTek Associates, Tampa, Fla., and the consulting engineer for the Dare County Water Department.
John Rifleman is a control systems engineer for Water Equipment Technologies, Inc., West Palm Beach, Fla. He was the installation superintendent for the reverse osmosis system as well as the control systems integrator for the single automation platform.

Activation Date: 
January 9, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13501

ETV Testing Verifies Membrane Filtration Plant Treats Surface Water, Meets D/DBP Rule

A study published as part of the EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program verifies the performance of a Fyne Process membrane filtration plant tested on high organic-laden surface water in Barrow, Ark. The plant was able to remove significant levels of organics--precursors to disinfection byproducts such as trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids (HAA)--producing water that easily met the disinfection byproduct standards set by the EPA's stringent Stage 1 D/DBP Rule.

About The Author: 

PCI Membrane Systems offers complete water treatment packages including containerized plants, and also can provide remote monitoring of system performance. In addition to tubular membranes for liquids containing suspended or colloidal materials, PCI also supplies spiral-wound or hollow fiber membranes for clean solutions and ceramic membranes for high chemical compatibility and thermal resistance.

Activation Date: 
November 27, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13439
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