Membrane Filtration As an Alternative: Part 2

Part one of this article appeared in the July issue and discussed microfiltration and utrafiltration. This article discusses nanofiltration and reverse osmosis.

About The Author: 

Dr. Mohamed Lahlou is the technical assistance specialist for the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse. This article originally appeared as a tech brief for the NDWC.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11813

Membrane Filtration as an Alternative: Part 1

Once considered a viable technology only for desalination, membrane processes are increasingly employed for removal of bacteria and other microorganisms, particulate material and natural organic material that can impart color, tastes and odors to the water.

About The Author: 

Dr. Mohamed Lahlou is the technical assistance specialist for the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse. This article originally appeared as a tech brief for the NDWC.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11775

Legionella: Minimizing Risks

Legionellosis, the disease caused by Legionella spc., is common, though most people would guess it is extremely rare. Outbreaks of Legionellosis, defined as a cluster of three or more cases in a single locale, occur regularly in the United States and much of the developed world. Outbreaks have been reported in Australia, Holland, Thailand, Japan, England and many other countries. In the U.S., the Center for Disease Control (CDC) receives reports of 1,000 cases of Legionellosis annually.

About The Author: 

W. Craig Meyer is a professor of environmental sciences at Pierce College, Woodland Hills, California.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11799

Precision Tubing Ensures Purity of Water Filtration System

In today's laboratory environment, it is essential that pure water is available for numerous applications.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11737

New Arsenic Treatment Technology Tested in India

A new low cost technology for purifying arsenic contaminated groundwater assists the government of India in removing this slow but steady assassin from their midst.

Deck: 

System requires no electricity, treats 1,000 liters per day in West Bengal

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11700

Ceramic Filters: The Fight Against Bacteria, Viruses & Protozoa

How can someone protect himself from consuming water contaminated with Cryptosporidium or other microorganisms? One durable and competitively priced option is ceramic filters.Until recently, the United States was essentially a carbon filter market, in that chlorine, dirt, foul taste and odor were thought to be the only problems with drinking water. With the advent of the Cryptosporidium parvum outbreak in Milwaukee in 1993, the general public and water treatment dealers started to question the quality of municipally treated water and private wells.

About The Author: 

David Webb is president of Ceramic Filters Co., which has distributed Doulton and British Berkefeld products in North America for more than 10 years. His experience within the field of water filtration spans almost 30 years. David and his staff can be reached at 517-467-4788; e-mail eramic@frontiernet.net; www.doultonwaterfilters.com.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11644

Liquid Regeneration of Spent Activated Carbons

New liquid phase-based processes to regenerate spent AC have been conducted. Two liquid processes, competitive adsorbate displacement and supercritical fluid (SCF) regeneration, will be discussed.

About The Author: 

Henry Nowicki, Ph.D., is the principal investigator for developing these liquid-based processes for regeneration of spent AC. He also is president of PACS and provides major organic and inorganic testing, ASTM activated carbon testing, BET surface areas and research and development for the AC industry. PACS provides 57 different public training courses including three courses related to activated carbon adsorption. He may be reached at 724-457-6576; e-mail hnpacs@aol.com

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11602

Bulk Bag Unloader, Flexible Conveyor Improve Filtration Effectiveness at Winery

Beringer Wine Estates, St. Helena, Calif., improved filtration effectiveness in its diatomaceous earth (DE) unloading and winery waste filtration area by an automated bulk bag unloader and flexible screw conveyor.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11635

Electrocoagulation Technology Keeps Site In Operation, Meets Regulatory Requirements

An oily water treatment facility on the Sabine River near Port Arthur, Texas, was not in compliance and had a large inventory of wastewater on site.

About The Author: 

Louis H. Knieper is the president of Ecoloqip, Inc., Houston, TX; Phone 713-849-1984; fax 713-849-4407; www.ecoloquip.com

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11562

The Gray Area: The Difference Between Commercial & Industrial

For a long time, the commercial and industrial (C&I) markets have been accepted as one sector of the water industry. Although considered different from such other markets as residential, agricultural and wastewater, there is a large murky area when being separated from each other.

With the recent proposals to create standards for the C&I markets comes the question of whether C&I should continue as one sector or be severed into separate entities. If a separation is in order, should it be determined by the application, flow rate or size of the equipment?

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is the editor for Water Quality Products magazine.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Company Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11565