Report Shows Some Shallow-Groundwater Wells Affected by Bio-Based Fertilizers

Source: 
USGS
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Some wells downhill from agricultural fields treated with bio-based fertilizers exhibited nitrate levels above EPA standards

Some shallow-groundwater wells next to or downhill from Orange County, N.C., agricultural fields treated with bio-based fertilizers have nitrate levels above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards set for public water supplies, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report titled “Effect of Land-Applied Biosolids on Surface-Water Nutrient Yields and Groundwater Quality in Orange County, North Carolina.”

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Publication Date: 
March 30, 2015

USGS Analyzes Idaho Groundwater Data to Optimize Future Aquifer Monitoring

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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The data reveal long-term trends toward improved groundwater quality in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists released analyses of more than 30 years of water quality data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The data reveal long-term trends toward improved groundwater quality in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Those results will be used to optimize the aquifer monitoring network at the INL Site.

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Publication Date: 
March 6, 2015

National Groundwater Awareness Week Promotes Education

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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National Groundwater Awareness Week is March 8 to 14, 2015

Groundwater, along with oxygen, is arguably the most important natural resource for human life, and National Groundwater Awareness Week, March 8 to 14, 2015, is a good time to learn how to become a good steward of it, according to the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA).

Ninety-nine percent of all available freshwater in the world is groundwater, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. That means all the world’s rivers, lakes and streams make up only 1%.

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Publication Date: 
March 3, 2015

Contaminant Cleanup

In the late 1990s, a coking facility in Detroit closed, and the site was subjected to strict cleanup requirements as part of new government regulations. As part of the overall site cleanup, the facility was required to capture groundwater contaminated with creosote oil, aromatic hydrocarbons, ammonia and iron, and prevent it from migrating off site and contaminating surrounding areas. The final destination for the groundwater was a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

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Bioreactor technology chosen to treat groundwater on the site of a former Michigan coking facility

About The Author: 

Abigail Antolovich is strategic marketing manager for UOP, a Honeywell Co. Antolovich can be reached at abigail.antolovich@honeywell.com or 847.224.5739.

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
Activation Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Man-Made Pollutants Finding Their Way Into Groundwater Through Septic Systems

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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A new study found that septic systems leak man-made pollutants into groundwater

Pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products associated with everyday household activities are finding their way into groundwater through septic systems in New York and New England, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).    

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Study Reveals Man-made Pollutants From Septic Systems in Groundwater

Source Water Protection Focus of SWC's Call to Action

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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The Source Water Collaborative issued a call to action to encourage the U.S. to protect its water resources

Changes to water quality and quantity challenge our nation to redouble its efforts to protect its water resources, states the Source Water Collaborative (SWC) in its recent call to action, "A Recommitment to Assessing and Protecting Sources of Drinking Water."

SWC, made up of 22 national organizations including the National Ground Water Assn., issued its call to action in late December in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

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Publication Date: 
February 9, 2015

NGWA CEO Named to Federal Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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National Ground Water Assn. CEO appointed to Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee

National Ground Water Assn. (NGWS) CEO Kevin McCray, CAE, was appointed to the federal Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC).

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Publication Date: 
February 5, 2015

USGS Launches Groundwater Toolbox

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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USGS released a new method for analyzing groundwater and surface water hydrologic data

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a new method for the analysis of groundwater and surface water hydrologic data called the Groundwater (GW) Toolbox. The GIS-driven graphical and mapping interface is a significant advancement in USGS software for estimating base flow (the groundwater discharge component of streamflow), surface runoff and groundwater recharge from streamflow data. 

Publication Date: 
January 29, 2015

Natural Petroleum Breakdown Can Lace Groundwater With Arsenic

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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A new study revealed that the breakdown of petroleum underground can release arenic into groundwater

In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the chemical release (mobilization) of naturally occurring arsenic into groundwater. This geochemical change can result in potentially significant arsenic groundwater contamination. 

Publication Date: 
January 27, 2015
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Natural Petroleum Breakdown Can Lace Groundwater With Arsenic

Marc Blais Joins Water Systems Council Board of Directors

Source: 
Water Systems Council
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The Water Systems Council announced that Marc Blais joined the board of directors

Marc Blais, vice president for Xylem Inc. Applied Water Systems - Americas, was named to the Water Systems Council (WSC) board of directors. 

Blais joined Xylem in 2011 as managing director for Applied Water Systems - Canada. He was named vice president for Applied Water Systems - Americas in 2014, and is responsible for its sales, distribution and customer service in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Publication Date: 
January 26, 2015