Man-Made Pollutants Finding Their Way Into Groundwater Through Septic Systems

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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A new study found that septic systems leak man-made pollutants into groundwater

Pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products associated with everyday household activities are finding their way into groundwater through septic systems in New York and New England, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).    

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Study Reveals Man-made Pollutants From Septic Systems in Groundwater

NGWA Aids CDC Study on Public Awareness Outreach

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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A CDC study, led by NGWA, is observing public awareness outreach to private well water owners

The National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) is leading an effort to study the effectiveness of public awareness outreach to private water well owners for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The goal is to better understand the elements of public outreach that are effective in motivating well owners to act in ways that protect their water quality and health.

Under a $78,358 CDC grant, NGWA’s project has two major parts:

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Publication Date: 
January 28, 2015
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NGWA Aids CDC Study on Public Awareness Outreach

Marc Blais Joins Water Systems Council Board of Directors

Source: 
Water Systems Council
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The Water Systems Council announced that Marc Blais joined the board of directors

Marc Blais, vice president for Xylem Inc. Applied Water Systems - Americas, was named to the Water Systems Council (WSC) board of directors. 

Blais joined Xylem in 2011 as managing director for Applied Water Systems - Canada. He was named vice president for Applied Water Systems - Americas in 2014, and is responsible for its sales, distribution and customer service in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Publication Date: 
January 26, 2015

NGWA Announces Directors & Officers for 2015

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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Richard Thron of Mantyla Well Drilling Inc. will lead national board

The National Ground Water Assn.’s (NGWA) 2015 national and divisional boards feature a number of new officers and directors.

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Publication Date: 
January 23, 2015
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The National Groundwater Association announced who will serve as its directors and officers this year.

Solving the Water Quality Puzzle

Water treatment can be a complex problem to solve, depending on which contaminants may be present and the desired water quality. There are a variety of contaminants that can make water unsafe to drink, such as microorganisms, inorganic metals and other inorganic compounds, organic chemicals and radiologicals. The presence of certain contaminants like calcium, magnesium and iron may not affect the safety of the water, but can make it unpleasant to drink and more difficult to clean with.

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Water testing is a key piece to solving water treatment challenges
About The Author: 

Marianne R. Metzger is director of new business development for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. Metzger can be reached at marianne.metzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
January 16, 2015
Activation Date: 
January 16, 2015
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AWWA: SDWA Anniversary Cause to Celebrate, 'Renew Our Commitment' to Safe Water

Source: 
American Water Works Assn.
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AWWA CEO David LaFrance thanks water professionals nationwide for keeping water safe for drinking

Dec. 16, 2014, marked the 40th anniversary of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which today includes regulations for more than 90 contaminants. American Water Works Assn. (AWWA) CEO David LaFrance issued the following statement to mark the occasion.

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Publication Date: 
December 18, 2014

Eno Scientific Releases Sonic Well Water Measurement Device

Source: 
Eno Scientific
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The device uses sound waves to measure water levels

Imagine turning on your faucet only to find there is no water flowing. Your well has run dry, and you have to pay tens of thousands of dollars to fix it. That is the scary scenario for communities grappling with drought, and it is a potential danger for the 43 million Americans nationwide (15% of the population) on well water.

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Publication Date: 
December 11, 2014

Water Well Trust Receives USDA Household Water Well Systems Grant

Source: 
Water Well Trust
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Grant will fund projects in Arkansas and Oklahoma

The Water Well Trust received a $140,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Household Water Well Systems program for a project to increase potable water availability to rural households in northwest Arkansas and Oklahoma.

The Water Well Trust will contribute a 51% match toward this project, or $71,400. These funds were donated by Water Systems Council members.

Publication Date: 
October 27, 2014
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Water Well Trust Receives USDA Household Water Well Systems Grant

NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study

Source: 
U.S. Department of Energy
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Study monitors a hydraulic fracturing operation in Greene County, Pa.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has released a technical report on the results of a limited field study that monitored a hydraulic fracturing operation in Greene County, Pa., for upward fracture growth out of the target zone and upward gas and fluid migration.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2014

NGWA Recommends Regularly Checking Well Water for Bacteria, Nitrate

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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The association recommends annual testing to eliminate health risks

Bacteria and nitrate are widespread in the environment, so every household water well owner should regularly test his or her water to make sure no health risk exists, the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) recommended.

While most bacteria found in water do not cause disease, disease-causing bacteria called pathogens can exist in well water given the right circumstances, NGWA said. Nitrate is not uncommon to rural areas due to its use in fertilizers and because it is sometimes linked to animal or human waste.

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Publication Date: 
August 29, 2014