Well Water Watch

Many residents across the U.S. rely on groundwater for their potable water supply, whether from a private water well or a municipal system that draws from a groundwater source. In recent years, legislation has put greater focus on wells and groundwater resources, with the potential to affect millions. WQP Managing Editor Kate Cline recently checked in with Margaret Martens of the Water Systems Council (WSC) and Jesse Richardson of West Virginia University to get the latest legislative updates.

About The Author: 

Margaret Martens is executive director of the Water Systems Council. Martens can be reached at mmartens@watersystemscouncil.org.

Jesse Richardson is lead land use attorney for the West Virginia University College of Law’s Land Use and Sustainable Development Law Clinic. Richardson can be reached at jessehokie@gmail.com.

Publication Date: 
April 1, 2015
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Sound Off

Imagine turning on your faucet one day only to find there is no water flowing. Your well has run dry, and you have to pay tens of thousands of dollars to fix it. When a North Carolina scientist ran into this issue, he searched for a product that could help. When he could not find one, he took matters into his own hands.

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Communities utilize sound wave technology to measure well levels

About The Author: 

Scott Curkin is senior account catalyst for 919 Marketing Co. Curkin can be reached at scurkin@919marketing.com.

Publication Date: 
April 1, 2015
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Report Shows Some Shallow Groundwater Wells Affected by Bio-Based Fertilizers

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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Some wells downhill from agricultural fields treated with bio-based fertilizers exhibited nitrate levels above EPA standards

Some shallow groundwater wells next to or downhill from Orange County, N.C., agricultural fields treated with bio-based fertilizers have nitrate levels above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards set for public water supplies, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report titled “Effect of Land-Applied Biosolids on Surface-Water Nutrient Yields and Groundwater Quality in Orange County, North Carolina.”

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Publication Date: 
March 30, 2015

Memorial Well Honoring 9/11 Victims Provides Water in Uganda

Source: 
Wells of Life
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The Anthony Kearns 9/11 Memorial Well is located in the Katakwi District of Uganda and is supplying water for 684 students

Wells of Life announced that its first-ever water well to honor the victims of 9/11 is now fully operational and providing fresh drinking water in Uganda.

The water well, dedicated by Wells of Life National Ambassador Anthony Kearns to honor those who lost their lives after the 9/11 attacks, is already drawing freshwater, according to Wells of Life Founder and President Nick Jordan.

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Publication Date: 
March 17, 2015

National Groundwater Awareness Week Promotes Education

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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National Groundwater Awareness Week is March 8 to 14, 2015

Groundwater, along with oxygen, is arguably the most important natural resource for human life, and National Groundwater Awareness Week, March 8 to 14, 2015, is a good time to learn how to become a good steward of it, according to the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA).

Ninety-nine percent of all available freshwater in the world is groundwater, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. That means all the world’s rivers, lakes and streams make up only 1%.

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Publication Date: 
March 3, 2015

Man-Made Pollutants Finding Their Way Into Groundwater Through Septic Systems

Source: 
U.S. Geological Survey
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A new study found that septic systems leak man-made pollutants into groundwater

Pharmaceuticals, hormones and personal care products associated with everyday household activities are finding their way into groundwater through septic systems in New York and New England, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).    

Publication Date: 
February 11, 2015
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Study Reveals Man-made Pollutants From Septic Systems in Groundwater

NGWA Aids CDC Study on Public Awareness Outreach

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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A CDC study, led by NGWA, is observing public awareness outreach to private well water owners

The National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA) is leading an effort to study the effectiveness of public awareness outreach to private water well owners for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The goal is to better understand the elements of public outreach that are effective in motivating well owners to act in ways that protect their water quality and health.

Under a $78,358 CDC grant, NGWA’s project has two major parts:

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Publication Date: 
January 28, 2015
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NGWA Aids CDC Study on Public Awareness Outreach

Marc Blais Joins Water Systems Council Board of Directors

Source: 
Water Systems Council
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The Water Systems Council announced that Marc Blais joined the board of directors

Marc Blais, vice president for Xylem Inc. Applied Water Systems - Americas, was named to the Water Systems Council (WSC) board of directors. 

Blais joined Xylem in 2011 as managing director for Applied Water Systems - Canada. He was named vice president for Applied Water Systems - Americas in 2014, and is responsible for its sales, distribution and customer service in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Publication Date: 
January 26, 2015

NGWA Announces Directors & Officers for 2015

Source: 
National Ground Water Assn.
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Richard Thron of Mantyla Well Drilling Inc. will lead national board

The National Ground Water Assn.’s (NGWA) 2015 national and divisional boards feature a number of new officers and directors.

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Publication Date: 
January 23, 2015
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The National Groundwater Association announced who will serve as its directors and officers this year.

Solving the Water Quality Puzzle

Water treatment can be a complex problem to solve, depending on which contaminants may be present and the desired water quality. There are a variety of contaminants that can make water unsafe to drink, such as microorganisms, inorganic metals and other inorganic compounds, organic chemicals and radiologicals. The presence of certain contaminants like calcium, magnesium and iron may not affect the safety of the water, but can make it unpleasant to drink and more difficult to clean with.

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Water testing is a key piece to solving water treatment challenges
About The Author: 

Marianne R. Metzger is director of new business development for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. Metzger can be reached at marianne.metzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
January 16, 2015
Activation Date: 
January 16, 2015
Issue Reference: 
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