New Technology Desalinates Sea Water at 80 Percent Less Cost than Current Methods

Demand for a cheaper way to transform saltwater into fresh has spurred the development of a new technology by AquaSonics International, Inc., the Rapid Spray Distillation (RSD) process, that desalinates water at a fraction of the cost of current methods.

Deck: 

Products at Work

Activation Date: 
August 9, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12530

Using Horizontal Wells for Groundwater Remediation

 

Deck: 

At Work on Groundwater Treatment

Activation Date: 
April 23, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12338

Desalination of Seawater Helps Meet Fresh Water Demand

Three French companies are meeting the water demands of large populations through the use of seawater desalination.Distillation and reverse osmosis are two competing techniques in the desalination of seawater. While each method has pros and cons, both provide a vital service in making seawater drinkable. Three French water companies (Saur, Degremont and Sidem) are working to improve the quality of fresh water created by both these methods and have invested heavily in the Mediterranean and Middle East markets with these technologies.

 

Las Palmas, Spain

Deck: 

Water Sources

About The Author: 

J.L. Martin-Lagardette is a free-lance environmental writer in Paris, France.

Publication Date: 
March 30, 2012
Activation Date: 
April 20, 2001
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12334

Seawater Desalination With Reverse Osmosis

Desalination technology has brought fresh water and hence industrial and commercial development to areas of the world that otherwise might have remained unproductive. Not only has development been enhanced by this technology but, more importantly, the health and welfare of many people have been improved by the supply of sanitary fresh water supplies.

About The Author: 

Jorg Menningmann is president of Waterlink Pure Water Division.

Activation Date: 
March 14, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12207

Membrane Filtration as an Alternative: Part 1

Once considered a viable technology only for desalination, membrane processes are increasingly employed for removal of bacteria and other microorganisms, particulate material and natural organic material that can impart color, tastes and odors to the water.

About The Author: 

Dr. Mohamed Lahlou is the technical assistance specialist for the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse. This article originally appeared as a tech brief for the NDWC.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11775

Improving the Quality of Deionizers

Though both the cation and the anion resin are responsible for the quality of a deionization (DI) system effluent, it is the cation resin that is the big contributor to leakage.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11606

Desalination System Brings Water to Small Island Off Washington Coast

Off the coast of Washington, 32 families on Guemes Island were faced with an aging well that was drawing salt water into its system. Because groundwater is scarce on the island, residents had to rely on what little rain water soaks into the ground.

About The Author: 

Osmonics, Minnetonka, MN
Phone 800-605-6698, Fax 719-536-3301
www.osmonics.com

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11561

Desalination of Seawater and Brackish Water

The increasingly broad range of requirements for water quality has motivated the water treatment industry to refine existing techniques, combine methods and explore new water purification technologies including desalination.

About The Author: 

Wil Pergande is vice president of special projects for Osmonics, Inc., a manufacturer and worldwide marketer of high-technology water purification and fluid filtration, separation and handling equipment. He offers more than 30 years experience in management, sales and marketing in the water treatment industry. He may be reached at 612-933-2277.

Barry Abolmaali is the manager of applications engineering and customer service at Osmonics, Inc., Vista Operations. He has utilized his chemical engineering degree at Osmonics for eight years. He may be reached at 760-598-1800.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11516

Guidelines for Cation Resin Replacement

This article discusses strong acid cation resin typically used in water softeners or as the first unit in a two-bed cation-anion demineralizer.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11436

RO Desalinators & PLCs Provide Fresh Water to Remote Areas

Reverse osmosis plants increasingly are being installed in outlying and remote areas. By providing water they can sustain life and/or provide irrigation to previously remote areas without readily available fresh water sources.

About The Author: 

Gregory Nadsady is a mechanical engineer who has been with Sea Recovery Corporation for two years. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Loyola Marymount University and is working on a Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering and Mechanical Design.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11365