Louisiana Meets New Security Requirements with Quick Test to Monitor Chemical Profile at Plants, Water Sources

As part of its Safe Drinking Water Program, the State of Louisiana recently implemented 12 units of the Severn Trent Services Eclox(tm) Rapid Response Water Testing System. Eclox offers municipalities a low cost option for monitoring water quality and meeting new security requirements.

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Products In Action

Activation Date: 
October 8, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13372

Controlling Hospital Grease, Sludge Discharges

One of the major problem areas in St Petersburg, Florida has two hospitals and a nursing home that discharge to a common sewer line. Historically, the city had to clean this section of the sewer line at least four times a year to avoid blockages and sanitary sewer overflows. Working together, the city and one of the hospitals took action to control the discharge of grease from the hospital's facilities and to reduce the costs of maintenance for both the city and the hospital.

About The Author: 

Worldstone, Inc. manufactures separation tank monitoring solutions for on-site wastewater management and is based in Sandwich, Mass.

Activation Date: 
September 6, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13328

The Invisible Sewage Plant

If you go looking for a particular sewage treatment plant in Cincinnati, Ohio, the first thing you'll notice is--you might not notice it at all. In fact, you might drive right by the facility, dismissing it as just another office building. It just does not look like a treatment plant.

Deck: 

CSO Elimination

About The Author: 

Carl Dorsch is a mechanical design engineer, now doing freelance technical writing. He lives in Cincinnati and graduated with a BSME from the University of Toledo.

Activation Date: 
September 4, 2002
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13302

Stormwater Retrofitting to Protect Drinking Water Reservoirs from the Impacts of Urban Runoff - Part 2

The Kensico Reservoir Stormwater Management Program is designed to reduce fecal coliform bacteria and turbidity delivered to the reservoir by controlling and treating stormwater. The first phases of the project, assessment of the watershed, site selection and the screening and design of stormwater control and treatment facilities, were completed in July 1998. Facility construction began in the spring of 1999 and completed early in 2001. DEP has committed to monitoring and evaluating facility performance and maintaining the facilities.

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Watershed Protection

About The Author: 

James D. Benson, AICP, CPESC, is a supervisor for the NYC Department of Environmental Protection, 465 Columbus Avenue, Valhalla, N.Y. 10595, phone: 914-742-2034, e-mail: BensonJ@water.dep.nyc.ny.us.
Melissa Beristain, CPESC, works with Benson in the New York City Department of Environmental Protection’s Bureau of Water Supplies.

Activation Date: 
July 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13197

Stormwater Retrofitting to Protect Drinking Water Reservoirs from the Impacts of Urban Runoff - Part 1

This paper summarizes the stormwater management element of the program and its control of the two key pollutants regulated by the SWTR: fecal coliform bacteria and turbidity that are conveyed to the reservoir by stormwater.

Deck: 

To meet federal Surface Water Treatment Rule requirements & U.S. Environmental Protection Filtration Avoidance mandates, the NYC Environmental Protection Dept developed a proactive program

About The Author: 

James D. Benson, AICP, CPESC, is a supervisor for the NYC Department of Environmental Protection, 465 Columbus Avenue, Valhalla, N.Y. 10595, phone: 914-742-2034, e-mail: BensonJ@water.dep.nyc.ny.us.
Melissa Beristain, CPESC, works with Benson in the New York City Department of Environmental Protection’s Bureau of Water Supplies.

Activation Date: 
June 5, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13135

Increased Treatment Security, Process Optimization Through Improved Monitoring Techniques

Recent implementation of the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT1ESWTR) has increased potable water sampling and analysis requirements for an additional 11,000 treatment plants serving more than 18 million Americans.

About The Author: 

Robert L. Bryant is the president of Chemtrac Systems, Inc. located in Norcross, GA.

Activation Date: 
May 7, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13107

Automated Chlorine Control Brings Precision to Water Reclamation Operation

Using reclaimed water for non-potable purposes as a means of conserving potable water supplies is the most prevalent method of water reuse in the United States today. One of the significant challenges for water reclamation facilities is to keep up with the demands for safe, compliant chlorine (Cl2) treatment. One utility that is effectively meeting this challenge is Southern California’s Otay Water District.

About The Author: 

Steve Kobler is the water disinfection technician for the Otay Water District, Otay, Calif.

Activation Date: 
May 6, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13089

Practical Engineering Combined with Sound Operations Optimizes Phosphorus Removal

Built in the early 1970s, The Oakland, Maine, Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) treats and discharges approximately 300,000 gallons per day (gpd) of wastewater to the Messalonskee Stream. The facility was designed as a conventional activated sludge secondary treatment system to be used principally for BOD and TSS removals. The secondary effluent enters the Messalonskee Stream upstream of several impoundments. This practice has resulted in a steady decline in the water quality of the stream as evidenced by increased algae blooms and other signs of euthophication in impoundments located downstream of the discharge.

About The Author: 

James Fitch, P.E., is a vice president with Woodard & Curran, Portland, Maine, with special expertise in municipal facilities. Daniel Bolduc is superintendent of the Oakland, Maine, Wastewater Treatment Facility.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13039

Effects of Recharge of Chlorinated State Water Project Waters to Groundwaters in Lancaster Area of California

As the population in Southern California increases, more and more demands are being put on the state’s groundwater resources, further exacerbating the overdraft problem. Many communities in Southern California are recharging their aquifers with imported surface waters to combat this problem. The major recharge normally is carried out during wet weather periods when surface water is plentiful. However, recharging these groundwater aquifers with imported surface water can create the potential for water quality degradation. The problem can start when surface water is disinfected with chlorine to prevent biofouling and remove pathogens.

Deck: 

Groundwaters in many parts of California are an important sole source of water supply. However, in some areas indiscriminate pumping has lowered aquifer levels by hundreds of feet. This has caused sediment compaction and ground subsidence.

About The Author: 

Hisam A. Baqai, P.E., G.E., is the division manager of the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board in Victorville, Calif.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13036

Cutting Grease With Ongoing Monitoring and Maintenance

Grease is clogging sewers nationwide, creating a costly mess to clean up and a dilemma for officials and regulators. Recently, the Wall Street Journal reported that 75 percent of the sewer systems in the United States work at only half capacity because of grease clogs. The cost of keeping sewers open, a cost borne by taxpayers at a local level, is $25 billion per year. The increase in grease in sewer lines is a direct result of the phenomenal growth in dual-income households who choose to eat out or take-out rather than cook at home.

About The Author: 

James M. Russell is founder and president of Worldstone, Inc., Sandwich, Mass., where he has more than 20 years of experience in the electronics industry with an emphasis on developing products for emerging markets. He holds a patent in transducer monitoring of separation tanks and a BS in Electrical Engineering Technology from Wentworth Institute of Technology.

Activation Date: 
March 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12990