Disinfection for Safe Water

Water supplies can contain living organisms such as bacteria, protozoa, worms, viruses and fungi. When these organisms are the sources of diseases, they are known as pathogens.

Pathogens can lead to infectious diseases such as typhoid fever, dysentery, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, cholera, jaundice, hepatitis, undulant fever and tularemia, making the water supply unsafe for human consumption. Disinfection plays a key part in turning non-potable water into water that is microbiologically safe to drink.

Deck: 

Eliminating pathogens to protect human health

About The Author: 

Amy Reichel is sales associate for the Water Quality Assn. Reichel can be reached at areichel@wqa.org or 630.505.9637.

Publication Date: 
February 3, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 3, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23223

Water Distillation

Of all the water purification technologies used in the bottled water industry, distillation is the only process that replicates the hydrological cycle: water is heated until it forms steam; the steam is cooled to condensation, creating water, minus the impurities left behind in the boiling. It is a simple evaporation-condensation-precipitation system.

Deck: 

New technology meets cost challenges for bottled water industry

About The Author: 

Bruce Kucera is vice president of Norland Intl., Inc., Lincoln, Neb. He can be reached at 402.441.3744, or by e-mail at bk@norlandintl.com.

Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16367

Chromium: Getting the Facts Straight

In recent years, chromium became a more talked about contaminant among consumers. It helped that not only was it being covered in news reports, but even Hollywood took a chance at bringing it to the forefront of concerns among consumers with its movie, “Erin Brockovich.”

Publication Date: 
March 30, 2004
Activation Date: 
March 30, 2004
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15005

Back to the Basics, Part 3

In this last section of a three-part series, the use of ozone, ionization, distillation and aeration is discussed in a simple fashion to help the beginner rationalize the importance for a full understanding of these technologies and the need, again, for a professional water treatment specialist.

This is the final article in a three-part series discussing water chemistry and technology basics.

Deck: 

Brushing up on water treatment 101, part 3

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a Certified Water Specialist–I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and has helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controller. Roseman is a master distributor of Ethylene Control, Inc., and distributes Hanna Instrument, Pura and Hydrotechnology Filtration Systems and Pro-Zone International Ozone Products. He is the owner of Aqua Ion Plus+ Technologies and can be e-mailed at jeff@aquaionplus.com; 219-362-7279; www.aquaionplus.com.

Publication Date: 
June 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
June 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13170

Bioterrorism May Pose Threat to Water Supplies

If our water supplies actually do come under attack, the question remains: Is there any way for consumers to protect themselves? Unfortunately, it seems to be too early to tell, yet some companies are beginning to emerge with products that may be the answer.

Deck: 

Can POU/POE technology aid the war on bioterrorism?

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope King is the editor of Water Quality Products and may be reached at wqpeditor@sgcmail.com. Linda Chaloux is an environmental industry analyst for Frost & Sullivan and is focused on water and wastewater applications, specifically on water recycling. She has authored 125 technical articles in 30 publications, completed two industry reports and published a field testing method for Hexavalent Chromium (VI).

Activation Date: 
December 4, 2001
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12809

Arsenic

On June 22, 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposed rule that would lower the current national primary drinking water standard for arsenic.

Deck: 

Addressing Arsenic Contamination Through Residential Drinking Water Treatment

About The Author: 

Jane Wilson, M.P.H., is senior project manager of standards at NSF International.

Activation Date: 
February 14, 2001
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12016