Arsenic Treatment Options for the Southwest

While high concentrations of arsenic are found mostly in the Western region of the United States, parts of the Midwest and New England show levels of arsenic
that exceed the newly approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 parts per billion (ppb). Individuals not willing to wait for their water system's compliance with the arsenic standard currently are looking for treatment systems to use in their homes. POU and even point-of-entry (POE) treatment systems are an attractive solution for these individuals. The process should begin with a basic understanding of arsenic contamination and the element's chemistry, a complete water quality analysis of the application-specific water and the knowledge of available technologies.

Activation Date: 
January 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13655

Controlling Mechanisms of Contaminant Ion Leakage in Condensate Polishing Systems

Extracting the maximum benefit from condensate polishing systems continues to be a top priority among many electric utility plants. With cost reduction pressures and increasing water quality standards, owners and operators continue to evaluate the resin handling procedures that affect corrosion product transport and contaminant ion impurity levels.

About The Author: 

Stephen W. Najmy is a project manager for The Dow Chemical Co. He has worked in the technical service and development department for Dow Liquid Separations for the past 10 years. Much of his job focuses on the development of new resin products and procedures for condensate polishing systems. He is based at Larkin Laboratory in Midland, Mich.

Activation Date: 
September 11, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12618

Oxidizing Arsenic III to Arsenic V for Better Removal

On June 22, 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed lowering the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic from 50 down to 5 micrograms/L (Federal Register, 2000).

About The Author: 

Dr. Dennis Clifford, P.E., is a professor of environmental engineering and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston. He has more than 30 years experience in teaching, research and consulting related to water and soil treatment. During the last 20 years, he and his students have extensively researched the subject of arsenic speciation, oxidation and treatment.

Ganesh Ghurye received his master’s degree in environmental engineering from the University of Houston, where he currently is a researcher in the area of water treatment. He has five years experience in developing arsenic treatment methods.

Activation Date: 
March 14, 2001
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12210

Just the Facts: Knowing Strong Base Anion Resin Types

Deciding which type of strong base anion (SBA) resin to use in a deioinizing application does not have to be a guessing game. The following article reviews chemical property differences that exist in SBA resin and how these differences affect resin performance.Deciding which type of strong base anion (SBA) resin to use in a deioinizing application does not have to be a guessing game. In fact, selecting the correct SBA resin for your application can be simple as long as you know the facts about the resin and the circumstances in which they will be employed.

About The Author: 

Carl J. Galletti is the Midwest technical sales manager for ResinTech, a supplier of ion exchange resins and granulated activated carbon. He has worked within the chemical separation technology field for eleven years while at DuPont’s Biotechnology Division and ResinTech. Since joining ResinTech in 1992, Mr. Galletti has written articles on ion exchange and granulated activated carbon applications.

Publication Date: 
December 28, 2000
Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11711

Continuous Electrodeionization: The Chemical-Free Way to Produce High-Purity Water

The cost of chemical regeneration and waste neutralization rises, industries search for alternatives.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11345