Aquion Adds IQsoft Products to Water Treatment Controls’ Portfolio

Source: 
Aquion Inc.
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IQsoft cabinet water softeners will be sold under the Erie Water Treatment Controls brand

Aquion Inc. announced the introduction of a new range of cabinet water softeners, the IQsoft series, that will be sold under the Erie Water Treatment Controls brand name.

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Publication Date: 
January 25, 2013

Arizona May Defer Salinity Legislation Until 2014

Source: 
Water Quality Assn.
Deck: 

Committee members suggest that the contribution of water softeners can be addressed first

Focusing on voluntary limits, the head of the Arizona Salinity Committee suggested last month that legislative solutions may not be attempted in the upcoming 2013 session.

Rep. Karen Fann, who spearheaded the creation of the committee, said she will only run a bill if there is a good product that has been vetted by all stakeholders and has enough support to have a 90% chance of passing. Otherwise, a bill should not be introduced until 2014, she said. 

These developments came at a meeting of the Technical Advisory Subcommittee of the committee.

Publication Date: 
December 4, 2012
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Arizona May Defer Salinity Legislation Until 2014

Web-Based Water Softening Calculator Now Available

Source: 
Purolite
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Purolite’s Web-based softening calculator estimates ion exchange resin requirements for hardness removal

Purolite has released a Web version of its proprietary softening calculator to the general public. This calculator estimates the ion exchange resin requirements for softening of ground, potable, process and wastewaters.

“This calculator is the second of a series of Web-based calculators we are releasing under our Puredesign family of calculators specific for ion exchange processes. This calculator enables the rapid calculation of ion exchange resin for softening and is extremely easy to use,” said Francis Boodoo, director of applied technologies for Purolite.

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Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
October 25, 2012

Scale Reduction Savings

The Greenfield Village mixed-use community, located at the southern end of the Salinas Valley in Greenfield, Calif., experienced significant problems caused by limescale buildup inside its 128 apartments’ water heaters and recirculation pumps. In the four years since the apartment complex was built, limescale buildup was so aggressive that many of the water heaters and recirculation pumps failed. The complex’s owners faced a minimum cost of $600,000 to replace the equipment.

Searching for a Solution

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Conditioning system helps apartment complex increase energy efficiency

About The Author: 

Marc Korody is comptroller and general manager for Greenfield Village LLC. Korody can be reached at 650.204.3140.

Publication Date: 
June 28, 2012
Activation Date: 
June 28, 2012
Issue Reference: 

Gaining Acceptance

Going green is all the rage these days. Whether it is constructing a wind farm, installing solar energy panels on a roof or simply switching to CFL light bulbs in a home, Americans are finding ways to tap renewable resources and conserve energy.

The push for energy conservation is good news for the water quality industry: The Water Quality Research Foundation Energy Savings Study showed that using softened water in a home improves energy efficiency and can save homeowners money on heating costs.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
June 28, 2012
Activation Date: 
June 28, 2012
Issue Reference: 

Softener

This softener allows consumers to easily monitor and adjust water softness. It features the Custom Select blending valve, which adjusts water softness by turning a knob. SmartSoft technology “learns” water use patterns, ensuring soft water is available when needed, and the Salt Saver reduces salt use by up to 34%. The design includes an indicator that notifies users when salt is needed and a downward-angled salt refill opening for easier lifting and pouring of bagged salt.
 

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Sanitization for Safe Water

The Water Quality Assn.’s Guidelines for Disinfection and Sanitization of Water Treatment Equipment recommend that equipment be disinfected every six months, when it is serviced, after installation and when there is a contamination issue with the source water. If water treatment equipment is not properly sanitized, bacteria can grow and multiply on the inside surfaces of tanks and hoses.

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Options for sanitizing RO and softener equipment

About The Author: 

Justin Ramsey is marketing manager for Pro Products LLC. Ramsey can be reached at jramsey@proproducts.com or 800.285.9176.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2012
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23272

Quality Reigns Supreme

While consumers and business owners are now more cautious and conscientious with their dollars than at any time in recent history, there are still significant opportunities in both residential and commercial water treatment. These opportunities rely on three important facts:

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RO system’s results outweigh initial problems

About The Author: 

Tom Cartwright is CEO and cofounder of PureOFlow Inc. Cartwright can be reached at tcartwright@pureoflow.com.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2012
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23269

Treatment for the Troops

Uncle Sam and the U.S. Army recently called for an enlistment, but not in the traditional sense. This time, they needed to design and install a complete potable water treatment system for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the Ft. Stewart army base in Savannah, Ga.

Deck: 

Well water quality at army base creates unexpected challenges

About The Author: 

Randy Leathers is vice president, industrial sales, for WaterProfessionals. Leathers can be reached at randy@waterprofessionals.com or 864.295.9500.

Publication Date: 
March 27, 2012
Activation Date: 
March 27, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23268

Water Softening Goes Digital

Hardness is a common water quality issue that does not pose any direct human health risks. The minerals found in hard water—typically calcium and magnesium—have no ill health effects to speak of.

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New technologies provide options to combat hard water

About The Author: 

Jeff Zagoudis is contributing editor for Water Quality Products. Zagoudis can
be reached at jzagoudis@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7973.

Publication Date: 
February 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23235