Hydrofracturing & The Environment

Hydrofracturing is not a new concept—in fact, it has been utilized by the gas and oil industries in the U.S. since the 1940s. Thanks to increased media attention, however, many are led to believe that this is a new technology developed specifically for the extraction of natural gas.  

Deck: 

Evaluating gas drilling’s effects on groundwater and air quality

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business manager for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. and a member of the Water Quality Products Editorial Advisory Board. Metzger can be reached at mmetzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23121

Deciding on Disinfection

Over the years, the public has become more aware of drinking water quality issues. Urban development has placed increased stress on water resources, which in turn has increased the need for cost-effective methods to treat drinking water. This is true regardless of whether the installation is at a single point of use (POU) or at the point of entry (POE) for treating all water used in the home.

Point-of-Use Treatment

Deck: 

Choosing the right treatment option for the water supply

About The Author: 

Kyle Hicks is a technical support specialist at Viqua – a Trojan Technologies Co. Hicks can be reached at khicks@viqua.com. Phil Jones is the customer service/technical support manager at Viqua – a Trojan Technologies Co. Jones can be reached at pjones@viqua.com.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23118

A Growing Focus on Groundwater

In recent days, groundwater has been gaining attention. Increased hydraulic fracturing operations have caused controversy over potential methane gas contamination. Reports indicate that groundwater aquifers, especially in the drought-prone southwestern U.S., are being depleted more quickly than they can be recharged. Surveys, like the one recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reveal that contaminants such as arsenic are widespread in the nation’s water wells.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23116

Better Quality Assurance Through ORP

There are many forces driving water treatment and quality assurance practices: efficacy, reliability, health and safety, cost, practicability, aesthetics and government regulations from government agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Though effective, there are alternatives to the traditional testing methods prescribed for characterizing and monitoring water quality, saving time and money. 

Deck: 

Using ORP to accurately measure disinfectant efficacy

About The Author: 

Heather Rekalske is technical writer for Myron L Co. Rekalske can be reached at hrekalske@myronl.com or 760.438.2021.

Publication Date: 
October 26, 2011
Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23091

The First Year of Low Lead

In July 2011, the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) issued its first annual report on plumbing products sampled and tested for lead concentrations in 2010. All drinking water faucets that were sampled and tested were reported to comply with the state’s new low-lead law. 

Deck: 

California checks for compliance with its first round of product testing

About The Author: 

Jerry Desmond, Jr. is West Coast consultant for Plumbing Manufacturers Intl. Desmond can be reached at info@pmihome.org or 847.481.5500.

Publication Date: 
October 26, 2011
Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23089

Emergency Preparedness

As I write this, the U.S. is in the wake of two natural disasters: the earthquake that rocked the East Coast on Aug. 23 and Hurricane Irene, which spun its way from the Carolinas to Canada just a few days later.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23087

Arsenic & Activated Carbon

In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, better known Proposition (Prop) 65. The act requires the state to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. This list, which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include approximately 800 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.

Aiming for Arsenic

Deck: 

Preemptive testing can prevent costly penalties in California

About The Author: 

Sarah Zrout is quality manager with the Water Quality Assn. Zrout can be reached at szrout@wqa.org.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23038

Meeting Low-Lead Requirements for Valves

Many manufacturers or distributors of ball, butterfly, gate, check, control, globe, plug, relief, regulator, pinch or diaphragm valves have been or may be required by state or federal law to comply with low-lead requirements. If you have been required by the state to have your valves comply with low-lead regulations, there may be some confusion on where to start and how to proceed.

Following are suggestions that will help facilitate a quicker certification as well as help eliminate headaches in the long run with the certification.

Deck: 

Researching materials leads to a smoother compliance process

About The Author: 

Glen Kosowski, CWS-VI, is facility assessment manager for the Water Quality Assn. Kosowski can be reached at gkosowski@wqa.org or 640.505.0160.

Publication Date: 
June 1, 2011
Activation Date: 
June 1, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22815

Water Quality: A Selling Point

Private wells are largely unregulated, and the task of ensuring safety is usually left up to the homeowner. A handful of states have regulations requiring a water test on a private well when the property is sold or a new well is drilled. While not every state has regulations, there may be testing requirements at the county or township level for real estate transactions or certificates of occupancy.

Testing Options

Deck: 

Benefits of comprehensive water testing for homes with well water

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business unit manager for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. and a member of the Water Quality Products Editorial dvisory Board. Metzger can be reached at mmetzger@ntllabs.com or 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 13, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22681

Choosing Your Method

Determining the best methodology for accurate test results

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business unit manager for National Testing Laboratories, Ltd. Metzger can be reached at 800.458.3330 or by e-mail at mmetzger@ntllabs.com.

Activation Date: 
January 19, 2010
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
21392