Sensing Your Customers' Treatment Needs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers its Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels, which set non-mandatory water quality standards for 15 contaminants. These standards offer guidelines to assist public water systems in managing their drinking water for aesthetic considerations such as taste, odor and color.

Deck: 

Using your senses for initial diagnosis of water problems

Publication Date: 
October 31, 2003
Activation Date: 
October 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14569

Using Test Strips to Make the Sale

Water testing doesn't have to be complicated. Test kits are a quick, easy-to-use solution that even customers can perform themselves.

About The Author: 

John Gary is national sales manager at Industrial Test Systems, Inc., Rock Hill, S.C. He can be reached by phone at (800) 861-9712 ext. 218 or by email at jgary@cetlink.net.

Publication Date: 
May 30, 2003
Activation Date: 
May 30, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14122

E. Coli

This article provides a general overview of E. coli and drinking water as well as current and emerging monitoring and decontamination technologies.

Deck: 

Current and emerging monitoring and decontamination technologies

About The Author: 

Danielle Duclos is with Foresight Science & Technology

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14051

Bottled Water Testing

Consumers want to know if the bottled water they buy is safe. How and why bottled water is regulated is not common knowledge and can be confusing to customers. Bottlers who understand and can explain aspects of water quality, regulations and test results to their customers have a useful sales tool to promote their product.

Deck: 

What lab results mean and how to explain them to customers

About The Author: 

Barbara L. Marteney and Kristin M. Safran of National Testing Laboratories, Ltd. (NTL), specialize in consulting with bottled water companies regarding testing requirements and bottled water quality. They maintain contacts with bottled water regulators, industry associations and the FDA regarding regulatory changes and other issues that impact bottlers. They have authored numerous articles and given various presentations on these topics. Marteney and Safran can be reached at 800-458-3330 or 440-449-2525, Marteney at extension 217.

Publication Date: 
September 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
September 26, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13355

Shifts in Analytical Requirements

To remain successful, the water treatment professional should take advantage of advances in in-field testing as well as advances in laboratory analyses. This article describes the shifts in analytical requirements recommended to satisfy consumer desires and promote expansion of the POU/POE water treatment industry.

Deck: 

In-field testing and analysis become responsibility of dealers

About The Author: 

Troy Ethan is the president of Spectrum Laboratories in Minneapolis.

Publication Date: 
August 27, 2002
Activation Date: 
August 27, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13317

Know Your Bottled Water Regulations

The International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) tracks and takes action on a number of relevant issues. The goal is to ensure fair and equitable treatment of bottled water companies and to help the industry continue to deliver safe, high-quality bottled water products to a thirsty consumer market. In 2001, IBWA was engaged on both the federal and state legislative fronts, working hard to represent the bottled water industry and seeking the adoption of sensible, effective laws and regulations.

Deck: 

Security, Safety importing/exporting and record maintenance issues affecting the industry.

About The Author: 

Joseph K. Doss is the president of the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA). Founded in 1958, IBWA is an authoritative source of information about all types of bottled waters. Member companies account for more than 80 percent of all bottled water sales in the United States. For more information, call 800-WATER-11; www.bottledwater.org.

Activation Date: 
July 30, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13238

Monitoring Drinking Water Regulation Updates

The Water Quality Association (WQA) and the point-of-use/point-of-entry (POU/POE) industry as a whole face the usual list of federal and state regulatory challenges in 2002-2003.

Deck: 

The point-of-use and point-of-entry water treatment industry experienced several changes in standards and regulations.

About The Author: 

Carlyn Meyer is the director of public affairs for the Water Quality Association, Lisle, Ill. For additional information, visit www.wqa.org; 630-505-0160.

Activation Date: 
July 30, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13237

Evaluating Activated Carbons

New
challenges are emerging in the industry that require new methods and product
developments. This article discusses additional test methods for the AC
industry.

Deck: 

ASTM, AWWA and EPA Standard Methods and New Test Methods for AC

About The Author: 

Henry G. Nowicki, Ph.D. and MBA, directs the PACS Laboratory testing and consulting services and new business developments at PACS. He has obtained three patents and published more than 100 articles about environmental issues and AC adsorption and has been an expert witness in more than 30 legal cases. Dr. Nowicki may be reached at hnpacs@aol.com; www.pacslabs.com.

Mick Greenbank, Ph.D., is a surface chemist with 23 years of
varied experiences in AC and holds seven patents. He directs new test methods
development and application and provides special projects, consulting and
training for PACS. Dr. Greenbank teaches “Selecting the Best Activated
Carbon for the Application,” a PACS shortcourse. He may be reached at
mickpacs@aol.com.

Homer Yute is a mathematics and computer programming expert
who has developed seven software programs for the AC industry.

All authors may be reached at PACS, Inc., 409 Meade Dr.,
Coraopolis, PA 15108; 724-457-6576.

Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13128

Chlorine Taste in the Customer’s Drinking Water?

Chlorine produces bacteria-free water and eliminates algae and slime. It also removes hydrogen sulfide from ground water (wells and springs) and eliminates iron bacteria (cenothrix), which are associated with objectionable odor and taste.

Despite these important facts, some people still object to chlorine in their drinking water. Comments such as “I don’t like the way chlorine makes my water taste” are common.

Deck: 

Chlorine proves highly effective in water treatment

About The Author: 

1) White, George Clifford“Principles of Chlorination,” Handbook of Chlorination, Fifth Edition.

2) Hoober, Scott. Bottled Water: Does It Meet the Test? Ellen Miller Group, July 1995, Kansas Rural Water Association, “Lifeline.”

Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12977

Making the Filtration Buying Process Easier for Your Customers

If you’ve seen it once, you’ve seen it a hundred times — customers who come to you looking for a home filtration system, unaware of what their specific needs are. While many consumers simply want a system that improves their water’s taste and aesthetic qualities, the majority are looking for a product that will make their water healthier. But as you know, “healthier” is a subjective term, and without knowing the issues that are present in the customer’s water, providing them with a system that fits their needs isn’t very easy to do.

Deck: 

How Culligan helps its dealers become better-educated consumers of drinking water

About The Author: 

David M. Marsh is the director of marketing for Culligan International Co.

Publication Date: 
February 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12968