Monitoring Drinking Water Regulation Updates

The Water Quality Association (WQA) and the point-of-use/point-of-entry (POU/POE) industry as a whole face the usual list of federal and state regulatory challenges in 2002-2003.

Deck: 

The point-of-use and point-of-entry water treatment industry experienced several changes in standards and regulations.

About The Author: 

Carlyn Meyer is the director of public affairs for the Water Quality Association, Lisle, Ill. For additional information, visit www.wqa.org; 630-505-0160.

Activation Date: 
July 30, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13237

Evaluating Activated Carbons

New
challenges are emerging in the industry that require new methods and product
developments. This article discusses additional test methods for the AC
industry.

Deck: 

ASTM, AWWA and EPA Standard Methods and New Test Methods for AC

About The Author: 

Henry G. Nowicki, Ph.D. and MBA, directs the PACS Laboratory testing and consulting services and new business developments at PACS. He has obtained three patents and published more than 100 articles about environmental issues and AC adsorption and has been an expert witness in more than 30 legal cases. Dr. Nowicki may be reached at hnpacs@aol.com; www.pacslabs.com.

Mick Greenbank, Ph.D., is a surface chemist with 23 years of
varied experiences in AC and holds seven patents. He directs new test methods
development and application and provides special projects, consulting and
training for PACS. Dr. Greenbank teaches “Selecting the Best Activated
Carbon for the Application,” a PACS shortcourse. He may be reached at
mickpacs@aol.com.

Homer Yute is a mathematics and computer programming expert
who has developed seven software programs for the AC industry.

All authors may be reached at PACS, Inc., 409 Meade Dr.,
Coraopolis, PA 15108; 724-457-6576.

Activation Date: 
May 28, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13128

Chlorine Taste in the Customer’s Drinking Water?

Chlorine produces bacteria-free water and eliminates algae and slime. It also removes hydrogen sulfide from ground water (wells and springs) and eliminates iron bacteria (cenothrix), which are associated with objectionable odor and taste.

Despite these important facts, some people still object to chlorine in their drinking water. Comments such as “I don’t like the way chlorine makes my water taste” are common.

Deck: 

Chlorine proves highly effective in water treatment

About The Author: 

1) White, George Clifford“Principles of Chlorination,” Handbook of Chlorination, Fifth Edition.

2) Hoober, Scott. Bottled Water: Does It Meet the Test? Ellen Miller Group, July 1995, Kansas Rural Water Association, “Lifeline.”

Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12977

Making the Filtration Buying Process Easier for Your Customers

If you’ve seen it once, you’ve seen it a hundred times — customers who come to you looking for a home filtration system, unaware of what their specific needs are. While many consumers simply want a system that improves their water’s taste and aesthetic qualities, the majority are looking for a product that will make their water healthier. But as you know, “healthier” is a subjective term, and without knowing the issues that are present in the customer’s water, providing them with a system that fits their needs isn’t very easy to do.

Deck: 

How Culligan helps its dealers become better-educated consumers of drinking water

About The Author: 

David M. Marsh is the director of marketing for Culligan International Co.

Publication Date: 
February 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12968

Legionella Management and Monitoring: Part 2

Well-designed water distribution and cooling systems,
coupled with sound management and operational procedures, are essential to
control Legionella in industrial facilities—and a monitoring program
should not be considered as a replacement. However, most experts even those
ill-disposed towards routine Legionella monitoring, would agree that monitoring
should be considered if enough legionellosis risk factors apply to the system
in question. No management program, regardless of its treatment, maintenance or
monitoring components, can guarantee the absence of future legionellosis, but
prudent operational practices combined with ongoing review of risk factors will
allow facility managers to minimize exposure to Legionella and to its legal consequences.

Deck: 

Water specialists should make Legionella reduction a top priority

About The Author: 

Paul Warden is the vice president of Analytical Services, Inc. (ASI). Dr. Kristen Fallon is the laboratory director of ASI. Dr. Colin Fricker is an independent water quality and treatment consultant affiliated with ASI for special projects and research. Warden may be reached at 800-723-4432 ext. 15 or pwarden@analyticalservices.com.

Activation Date: 
January 30, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12917

Getting Started in the Bottled Water Business: Water Testing Requirements

This is the first in a series of three articles covering bottled water testing, source development and licensing and labeling.

Activation Date: 
December 28, 2000
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
11753