Desalination Challenges

Overcoming measurement obstacles in the desalination process

About The Author: 

1. Jessica Blanchard and Carol Smith, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 2, 2006. Arsenic Taints Water at 5 Schools.
2. www.ens-newswire.com, Lead levels
in DC Drinking Water Dropping,
March 14, 2005.
3. ELAN DRC-e at Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Helps to Resolve a Lead-Contaminated Drinking Water Crisis, PerkinElmer Case Study 007291_01.
4. John Tonner, Desalination in America, Water Quality Products, November 2002.
5. Ruth E. Wolf and Kenneth R Neubauer, Determination of Arsenic in Chloride Matrices, PerkinElmer Application Note D6357A, 2002.

Activation Date: 
January 1, 2006
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
17100

Research Put into Practice

There are many ways drinking water changes on its path to consumers’ taps. Corrosion of metal piping materials is one of the most significant causes of degradation. The more noticeable aesthetic degradation occurs as a result of oxidation of iron piping producing red, yellow or “rusty” water.

Deck: 

Lead in Seattle school district’s drinking water prompts major review

About The Author: 

Glen Boyd, Ph.D., and Gregory Pierson, P.E., can be reached at HDR, Inc., Seattle, Wash., at 425.450.6200, or by e-mail at glen.boyd@hdrinc.com or greg.pierson@hdrinc.com.

Publication Date: 
April 1, 2006
Activation Date: 
April 1, 2006
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16873

When the Levee Breaks

The flood-related consequences following Hurricane Katrina have had a devastating impact on water and wastewater operations in the city of New Orleans as well as the Gulf Coast region.

Deck: 

How the water and wastewater industry is helping the city of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast region rebound from Hurricane Katrina

About The Author: 

Tim Gregorski is editorial director for Water & Wastes Digest. He can be reached at 847/391-1011 or by e-mail at tgregorski@sgcmail.com.

Activation Date: 
October 1, 2005
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16378

The Wide, Wide World of Residential Water Treatment Product Testing

Whatever the structure of the testing service provider, the manufacturer must be satisfied that their partner can deliver the project turnaround, quality, scope of services, reliability, and ultimately, the value that they need.

Deck: 

Technology-specific testing methods in relation to the American National Standards

About The Author: 

Rick Andrew is the technical manager of the Drinking Water Treatment Units Program of NSF for more than three years. He has been with NSF International for more than six years, working with certification of residential drinking water products. His previous experience was in the area of analytical and environmental chemistry consulting. Andrew is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Water Quality Products. He has a BA in chemistry and an MBA from the University of Michigan. He can be reached at 800.NSF.MARK, or by e-mail at andrew@nsf.org.

Activation Date: 
June 2, 2005
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16108

Testing for Bacteria

Bacteria are the most abundant organisms on the planet. It is estimated that they have been in existence 3.5 billion years. These fascinating little creatures are responsible for many of the functions that allow Earth to sustain other forms of life. The health of our planet ultimately depends on their activities as they dwell everywhere throughout the planet such as in the soil, in food, on plants, in our bodies, in the waters and way deep within the Earth.

About The Author: 

Tami E. D’Amico, technical support and accounts manager with National Testing Laboratories, Ltd. (NTL) since 1997, works with companies such as water treatment equipment manufacturers and dealers, well drillers, contractors, engineers and consultants in the water industry. D’Amico has degrees in biology and general science studies. She serves on various Water Quality Association committees and has authored several articles for industry publications. NTL has served the water industry with quality analysis for informational and compliance testing requirements for more than 18 years. With headquarters in Cleveland, NTL has laboratory facilities in Michigan, Florida and Virginia. D’Amico can be contacted at 800-458-3330, ext. 222; tdamico@ntllabs.com.

Publication Date: 
March 30, 2004
Activation Date: 
March 30, 2004
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15003

Scattered Across the Nation

I thought I would take a moment to bring you up to speed on some of the contaminants making the news in the last month or so.

It is safe to say that this month’s issue has turned into a focus on contaminants. When researching and writing drinking water news for our website, I, of course, get the scoop on both breaking news and some that is less publicized in the greater media. I thought I would take a moment to bring you up to speed on some of the contaminants making the news in the last month or so.

About The Author: 

Wendi Hope Bishop,
wbishop@sgcmail.com,
www.wqpmag.com

Publication Date: 
March 30, 2004
Activation Date: 
March 30, 2004
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15002

Sensing Your Customers' Treatment Needs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers its Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels, which set non-mandatory water quality standards for 15 contaminants. These standards offer guidelines to assist public water systems in managing their drinking water for aesthetic considerations such as taste, odor and color.

Deck: 

Using your senses for initial diagnosis of water problems

Publication Date: 
October 31, 2003
Activation Date: 
October 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14569

E. Coli

This article provides a general overview of E. coli and drinking water as well as current and emerging monitoring and decontamination technologies.

Deck: 

Current and emerging monitoring and decontamination technologies

About The Author: 

Danielle Duclos is with Foresight Science & Technology

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
14051

Wet Chemical TOC Analysis

The goal of this article is to demonstrate that the Shimadzu TOC-VW can effectively oxidize the Humic Acid (HA) matrix at high accuracy and precision levels never before witnessed by the wet chemical TOC community. The Shimadzu TOC-VW Carbon analyzer is the only TOC on the market that uses three oxidation techniques of UV light, heat, and persulfate in a single analyzer.1

Deck: 

Humic Acid: A Complex Molecule, A Simple Solution

Activation Date: 
October 8, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13374