A Growing Focus on Groundwater

In recent days, groundwater has been gaining attention. Increased hydraulic fracturing operations have caused controversy over potential methane gas contamination. Reports indicate that groundwater aquifers, especially in the drought-prone southwestern U.S., are being depleted more quickly than they can be recharged. Surveys, like the one recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reveal that contaminants such as arsenic are widespread in the nation’s water wells.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. She can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23116

Small & Sustainable in North America

More than ever, sustainable surface and groundwater supplies are essential to communities across North America and around the world. The strains of industry and agriculture on groundwater are noticeable as pressures on water supplies intensify and supply patterns change. The increase in agriculture over vulnerable aquifers, climate change and hydrocarbon production are impacting water quality. Unregulated use or uncontrolled flow of groundwater can cause water quality degradation and conflict between water users.

Deck: 

Small drinking water systems opt for POE UV treatment

About The Author: 

Robin Keating is a regional sales manager with at VIQUA, a Trojan Technologies Co. Keating can be reached at rkeating@viqua.com

Publication Date: 
October 26, 2011
Activation Date: 
October 26, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23090

A Learning Experience

When McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, set about constructing its new Engineering Technology Building, it used the latest state-of-the-art technology not only to achieve U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, but also to create a living laboratory to train students on the building systems of the future. One of the components is a rainwater harvesting system that collects, filters and disinfects rainwater for non-potable and potable use in the building.

Deck: 

First-of-its-kind system treats rainwater for potable reuse

About The Author: 

Rick VanSant is president and CEO of UV Pure Technologies. VanSant can be reached at rvansant@uvpure.com or 416.208.9884.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23035

What the HEX is Going on With our Drinking Water?

I am sure many of you have seen the flood of recent headlines and articles posted all over newspapers, the Web and every news channel across the nation. The headlines are grim:

Deck: 

Getting to the bottom of a hot-button issue

About The Author: 

Brian Donda is Gold Seal and exhibit manager for the WQA. Donda can be reached at bdonda@wqa.org or 630.929.2527.

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 13, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22693

Hot or Cold, Filtration Is Key

When bottled water sales boomed in the mid-1990s, food service and hospitality operators and distributors learned that leasing point-of-use (POU) water vending products that offered fresh cold water and hot water-based beverages could be very profitable.

Treating Vending Water

There are two common types of water cooler vending systems: mains-fed from the tap and bottled water coolers. In any environment, it is important to know how to select the right type of filtration.

Deck: 

Filtration options to provide the best water

About The Author: 

Jim Nelson is director of sales for Everpure. Nelson can be reached at jim.nelson@everpure.com.

Publication Date: 
April 13, 2011
Activation Date: 
April 13, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22683

Arsenic Treatment in Wine Country

Wine producers in the northern California wine country, including Sonoma, Napa, Lake and Mendocino counties, encounter high levels of arsenic in groundwater extracted for use in wine processing and irrigation. These producers must lower arsenic levels to newer drinking water standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California’s Department of Health Services. Arsenic removal is also indicated to ensure product safety and to maintain customer confidence in wine products.

Deck: 

Meeting arsenic MCLs in northern California wine country

About The Author: 

James Knoll is Metsorb commercial manager for Graver Technologies LLC. Knoll can be reached at jknoll@gravetech.com or at 800.249.1990.

Publication Date: 
January 17, 2011
Activation Date: 
January 17, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22445

Gas Drilling & Water Quality

What to expect and how to protect drinking water

Gas well drilling has been growing in activity over the past 10 years across the U.S.—specifically gas drilling within shale—due to the technological advancements in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, which has made it more economically feasible to produce. Hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking, is a process that creates fractures within the rock formations to allow more fluids to flow to the well.

About The Author: 

Marianne Metzger is GPG business unit manager for National Testing Laboratories Ltd. and a member of the Water Quality Products Editorial
Advisory Board. Metzger can be reached at mmetzger@ntllabs.com or
at 800.458.3330.

Publication Date: 
November 23, 2010
Activation Date: 
November 23, 2010
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22321

Ion Exchange Developments

Ion exchange developments spur use in drinking water plants

About The Author: 

Francis Boodoo is technical director for The Purolite Co. and a member of the WQP Editorial Advisory Board. Boodoo can be reached at fboodoo@puroliteusa.com or 610.668.9090.

Activation Date: 
September 13, 2010
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
22147

Moving Beyond Bottles

Bottle-less coolers present a growing market opportunity

About The Author: 

Nick Friedman is director of operations for Blue Reserve. Friedman can be reached at 207.619.4422 or by e-mail at n.friedman@bluereserve.com.

Activation Date: 
April 5, 2010
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
21637

Movin’ On Up

New England’s tallest building turns to central RO system

About The Author: 

Elizabeth Lisican is associate editor of Water Quality Products. Lisican can be reached at 847.954.7958 or by e-mail at elisican@sgcmail.com.

Activation Date: 
February 8, 2010
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
21456
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