Zero Waste: A Look at the Future of Reverse Osmosis

Most reverse osmosis systems waste as much as 20 gallons just to produce one gallon of product water. The new technology called "ZeroWaste" eliminates this problem by returning the concentrate water from the reverse osmosis system back to the home's plumbing, resulting in 100 percent efficiency.

About The Author: 

Josh Hanford is the national sales manager for Watts Industries. He is the manager of new product development and serves on the Water Quality Association's RO Task Force.

Publication Date: 
March 11, 2003
Activation Date: 
March 11, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13839

Point-of-Use Reverse Osmosis

As the residential point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) industry approaches its 35th anniversary, it is time for a reality check on the industry's progress to date as well as a look ahead to new technologies or improvements that the industry may introduce for POU RO systems in 2003.

Deck: 

Looking for Answers in 2003 and Beyond

About The Author: 

Tony Pagliaro is marketing manager at Nimbus Water Systems.

Activation Date: 
January 31, 2003
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13657

NSF Announces Conference on POU & POE Technology

Source: 
NSF Intl.

The Center for Public Health Education, a division of NSF International (www.nsf.org), The Public Health and Safety Company announces a conference on "Public Water System Compliance Using Point-of-Use (POU) and Point-of-Entry (POE) Treatment Technologies." NSF is a global provider of public health and safety-based risk management solutions.

Company Reference: 
Publication Date: 
November 1, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
33781

Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Secondary Disinfection System

Chlorine dioxide is not a new technology for public drinking water facilities or pulp and paper producers, but its use as a secondary treatment system for small-scale applications is new. Beyond the chemistry and microbiology, potential small-scale operators want answers to a few simple questions: Should I use it? How does it work? What extra work is it going to make for me?

Deck: 

POE Disinfection

About The Author: 

Frank P. Sidari III, EIT, is currently with Malcolm Pirnie Engineers, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Jeanne VanBriesen, Ph.D., is an assistant professor, biomedical engineering and civil and environmental engineering, Carnegie Mellon University.

Activation Date: 
November 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13413

POU Faucet Selections

Faucets for point-of-use (POU) water treatment systems must combine an attractive, contemporary appearance with materials that ensure safety and purity. POU faucets and systems are becoming increasingly important to help meet consumer demands for safe, high-quality drinking water. It is estimated that by 2020 almost every household will have a POU or point-of-entry (POE) water treatment system.

About The Author: 

Gary M. Strunak is national sales manager for Tomlinson Industries' No-Drip product line. He is responsible for all No-Drip sales in the U.S. and Canada. He has been with Tomlinson since 1979. Tomlinson Industries has been a supplier to the bottled water industry since 1958. Strunak can be reached at 216.587.3400; fax 216.587.0733; gstrunak@tomlinsonind.com.

Publication Date: 
October 29, 2002
Activation Date: 
October 29, 2002
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13403

Bottled Water vs. Tap

While both sides of the bottled/tap battle continue trying to inform and ultimately win the consumer over, a few facts cannot be overlooked. Regardless of how a consumer obtains drinking water, both bottled and tap must draw from the same available global freshwater sources. Despite the information with which consumers are presented, ultimately the decision is theirs. When purchasing bottled water, knowing what you are getting requires some research and understanding.

About The Author: 

Nadia Abboud is the marketing manager for the filtration, disinfection and water bottling products for Severn Trent Services. A graduate of Villanova University, she received her B.S. in management with concentrations in international business and Arab and Islamic studies. Abboud can be reached at 215-997-4000; nabboud@severntrentservices.com.

Publication Date: 
September 26, 2002
Activation Date: 
September 26, 2002
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13353

Putting an End to Hard Water Problems

Glade Valley Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Marriott Hotels, Starbucks and The White House may be vastly different with regard to the people who use and manage the facilities; yet when it was time to solve water quality problems, they all looked to the same resource: Kevin Britton, a RainSoft dealer at Quality Water of Maryland, located in Frederick, Md. (part of the Washington D.C. metro area).

Deck: 

Nursing and rehabilitation center stops escalating plumbing repair costs

Publication Date: 
August 27, 2002
Activation Date: 
August 27, 2002
Files: 
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13318

Growing Awareness of POU

The future of safe drinking water lies squarely in the hands of the point-of-use (POU) water purification industry. Growing awareness among decision-makers and consumers is the force behind the increasing importance of the POU industry.

About The Author: 

Glenn Land is founder and president of Aduk, Inc. Bill Harrison is vice president of marketing. They may be reached at 276-773-2097.

Publication Date: 
April 25, 2002
Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13071

Using Advanced Adsorptive Media for Arsenic Treatment

On November 26, 2001, the new arsenic standard was signed into law—lowering the acceptable level for the contaminant from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. Approximately 4,100 municipal water systems serving nearly 13 million people nationwide are affected by the law and are required to meet compliance by January 2006. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 97 percent of these systems are small systems serving fewer than 10,000 people each. The economic impact on these small systems is likely to be large. However, there currently are options available to small municipalities that may be more affordable than central treatment.

Deck: 

New POU Technologies May Be the Answer for Small Municipalities Facing High Costs

About The Author: 

Greg Gilles is vice president of technical services and Jennifer Mathis is a sales representative for Apyron Technologies, an Atlanta-based material science company developing advanced solutions for arsenic treatment.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13040

POU Technology Demonstrates Effectiveness

In March 2001, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) withdrew a proposal for a lower maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water that would bring the standard from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. At that time, the EPA commissioned three studies to examine the benefits, costs and health effects associated with a lower standard for arsenic.

Deck: 

A brief look at one solution for arsenic removal

About The Author: 

Jennifer E. Mathis is an account representative for Apyron Technologies, Inc., Atlanta.

Activation Date: 
February 26, 2002
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12970
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