The Wide, Wide World of Residential Water Treatment Product Testing

Whatever the structure of the testing service provider, the manufacturer must be satisfied that their partner can deliver the project turnaround, quality, scope of services, reliability, and ultimately, the value that they need.

Deck: 

Technology-specific testing methods in relation to the American National Standards

About The Author: 

Rick Andrew is the technical manager of the Drinking Water Treatment Units Program of NSF for more than three years. He has been with NSF International for more than six years, working with certification of residential drinking water products. His previous experience was in the area of analytical and environmental chemistry consulting. Andrew is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Water Quality Products. He has a BA in chemistry and an MBA from the University of Michigan. He can be reached at 800.NSF.MARK, or by e-mail at andrew@nsf.org.

Activation Date: 
June 2, 2005
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16108

Bacteria… How Much Do They Bug Us

Sterility in the natural environment is not a normal scenario.

Deck: 

Overview of bacteria commonly found in drinking water

About The Author: 

Jonathan Dyer is president of A&L Laboratories, Inc., Auburn, Maine.
He can be reached at 207.784.5354.

Activation Date: 
April 6, 2005
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
16014

The Hidden Spore

Cryptosporidium—Once a Common Affliction to Travelers of Underdeveloped Countries, Now a Common Outbreak in Communities in the U.S.

About The Author: 

Jonathan Dyer, president of A&L Laboratories, Inc., Auburn, Maine. He can be reached by phone at 207-784-5354.

Activation Date: 
November 1, 2004
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15564

Low-Cost Solution to Treating Nitrates in Drinking Water

Nitrate can be a natural or man-made contaminant in drinking water. Nitrate (NO3), and its chemical cousin Nitrite (NO2), can cause methemoglobinemia or “blue baby” disease

About The Author: 

Kenneth W. Arnold, P.E., is the senior project manager at Arcadis FPS, Inc. He has 30 years experience in water/wastewater consulting. He may be reached at 800-876-1121.

Activation Date: 
June 1, 2004
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15208

Chromium: Getting the Facts Straight

In recent years, chromium became a more talked about contaminant among consumers. It helped that not only was it being covered in news reports, but even Hollywood took a chance at bringing it to the forefront of concerns among consumers with its movie, “Erin Brockovich.”

Publication Date: 
March 30, 2004
Activation Date: 
March 30, 2004
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
15005

Nitrate Removal by Ion Exchange

Nitrates have no detectable color, taste or smell at the concentrations involved in drinking water supplies, and they do not cause discoloration of plumbing fixtures, so they remain undetectable to our senses. Nitrate removal processes must be either foolproof or include extensive monitoring of the treated water to detect breakthrough or determine the need for regeneration.

Activation Date: 
March 27, 2003
Files: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13906

Legionella Solutions

Legionnaires' disease is considered so catastrophic that, in France, it must be reported to the medical authorities immediately. This practice has been in place since 1987. During the last decade, public health monitoring systems for this disease have been strengthened. Today, this hazard that arises from buildings has become an emerging public health problem in industrialized countries. The resulting respiratory infections are behind the recurrent epidemics emanating from hot water systems in buildings and air-conditioning cooling towers.

Deck: 

Companies develop treatment for hot water installations and air conditioning systems

About The Author: 

Bernard Banga is a freelance writer in Paris. For more information, contact the French Technology Press Office in Chicago at 312-222-1235; contact.ftpo@ubifrance.com.

Activation Date: 
August 27, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13315

Back to the Basics, Part 1

Basic water chemistry, terminology and applications can be very complicated and not seem so basic to individuals without a chemistry background. This series of articles will help shed light on the chemistry of water and the mysteries that it can contain, plus explain the technologies used to treat water so the purchaser can make an educated attempt to find the right solution for a particular application. There are no cut-and-dry formulas for water treatment and certainly no cure-all for every application or problem, but with an understanding of how water works and the technologies developed to treat water, a person can utilize his resources to come up with solutions for his particular need or application.

Deck: 

Brushing Up on Water Chemistry 101

About The Author: 

Jeff Roseman is a CWS-I with the Water Quality Association. He has a vast knowledge of chemistry and physics from studies in electrical engineering at Purdue University and helped develop a UV light air purifier and ionization controllers for Great Lakes Control Systems, in Leamington, Ontario, Canada.

Activation Date: 
April 25, 2002
Files: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13083

Effects of Recharge of Chlorinated State Water Project Waters to Groundwaters in Lancaster Area of California

As the population in Southern California increases, more and more demands are being put on the state’s groundwater resources, further exacerbating the overdraft problem. Many communities in Southern California are recharging their aquifers with imported surface waters to combat this problem. The major recharge normally is carried out during wet weather periods when surface water is plentiful. However, recharging these groundwater aquifers with imported surface water can create the potential for water quality degradation. The problem can start when surface water is disinfected with chlorine to prevent biofouling and remove pathogens.

Deck: 

Groundwaters in many parts of California are an important sole source of water supply. However, in some areas indiscriminate pumping has lowered aquifer levels by hundreds of feet. This has caused sediment compaction and ground subsidence.

About The Author: 

Hisam A. Baqai, P.E., G.E., is the division manager of the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board in Victorville, Calif.

Activation Date: 
April 2, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
13036

Consider the Source

A report released by the Environmental Working Group (EWG)
and U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) has taken aim at
chlorination byproducts (CBPs) in tap water. The group‘s assessment
states that more than 100,000 women are at elevated risk of miscarriage or
birth defects because of CBPs in tap water.

Deck: 

Editorial

Activation Date: 
February 4, 2002
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
12908