Water Management Systems

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New Product Showcase
Legacy ID: 
61583
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March 2012

Aquanomix systems are engineered to manage harvested rainwater, storm water, graywater, process water and foundation water for reuse. A control system performs input/output commands, runs onboard diagnostics and integrates with most building automation systems. A standard system includes a centrifugal separator and bag filter for suspended solids removal, a UV disinfection system and more.

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Aging Gracefully?

As U.S. water infrastructure continues to age, it is beginning to impact water quality. Jeff Zagoudis, contributing editor for Water Quality Products, spoke with Allan Connolly, vice president of operations and engineering at Culligan, about the problem and what is being done to solve it.

Jeff Zagoudis: How would you describe the current state of water infrastructure in the U.S.?

About The Author: 

Allan Connolly is executive vice president of operations and engineering for Culligan. Connolly can be reached at allan.connolly@culligan.com or 877.367.5479.

Publication Date: 
February 24, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 24, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23242

Reducing Rain Pollution

Rain barrels are one way the Think About Personal Pollution (TAPP) program in Tallahassee works to improve water quality in northwest Florida. Program Director John Cox spoke with Water Quality Products Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis to explain how these devices can turn a potent source of pollution into a boon for local consumers.

About The Author: 

John Cox is the program manager for the City of Tallahassee Storm Water Pollution Reduction Program, which includes TAPP. Cox can be reached at john.cox@talgov.com or 850.891.6860. Jeff Zagoudis is associate editor for Water
Quality Products. Zagoudis can be reached at jzagoudis@sgcmail.com or 847.954.7973.

Activation Date: 
February 3, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23224

The Battle to Regulate Rainwater

Literature and popular press are full of articles about the coming water shortage. While there are a myriad of options and technologies available to conserve, collect and recycle water, there is one source that has been available for as long as water itself: rainwater.

Rainwater harvesting and reuse is developing into a good market for water treatment professionals. Depending on the end use of the captured water, different levels of treatment will be required, creating a good place for water specialists to offer their expertise in treatment system design and installation.

Deck: 

Political and economic barriers impede growth of rainwater harvesting

About The Author: 

Bob Ferguson is an independent water and product standards consultant. Ferguson can be reached at bob.ferguson@charter.net or 734.604.7010.

Publication Date: 
February 1, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 1, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23216

Protecting Our Resources

Harvesting and reusing rainwater is not only a way to supplement water supplies, it also helps protect vital water resources from pollutants that storm water runoff carries into them. As concerns about water pollution and the impending global water shortage grow, it is increasingly important for everyone to take part in conserving and protecting drinking water supplies.

About The Author: 

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at kcline@sgcmail.com or 847.391.1007.

Publication Date: 
February 1, 2012
Activation Date: 
February 1, 2012
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23214

Rainwater Recycling in the Lone Star State

Rainwater harvesting and storm water recycling are similar processes, but rainwater harvesting usually involves collecting water from cleaner surfaces, such as roofs, while storm water typically is ground-level runoff. Both require collecting, storing and conserving rain for later use.

Deck: 

Rainwater harvesting system provides alternative to well water

About The Author: 

Jack Holmgreen, ARCSA-AP, WTS III, is president of SparkleTap Water Co. Holmgreen can be reached at jholmgreen@sparkletap.com or 281.538.1430.

Publication Date: 
November 30, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 30, 2011
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23149

Reclaim, Reuse, Reduce

Gateway Village, a 15-acre mixed-use development complex in North Carolina—designed to bring businesses, retailers, restaurants, new residents and visitors to the area—was developed through a joint venture between Bank of America and Cousins Properties. The complex is home to three office towers totaling more than 1 million sq ft of class A office space. In late 2007, North Carolina and a large portion of the southeastern U.S. endured an exceptional drought that prompted water restrictions across the region.

The Concept

Deck: 

Water reclamation system saves energy & water costs

About The Author: 

Joe Sgroi is an environmental applications engineer for Aqualine Water Treatment Products. Sgroi can be reached at jsgroi@aqualine.net or 704.895.5500.

Publication Date: 
November 4, 2011
Activation Date: 
November 4, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23120

Leading the Way With Rainwater Reuse

In the words of Alexandra Cousteau, “Water will be the defining crisis of our century.” Essentially, water is running out. Population is constantly growing, and water and storm water management costs are skyrocketing across the U.S., increasing by up to 8% per year. Without a sustainable water management plan that includes rainwater harvesting, both people and businesses will suffer.

Deck: 

System helps school become South Carolina's first LEED-certified educational facility

About The Author: 

Robyn Albaum is director of marketing for Aquanomix. Albaum can be reached at ralbaum@aquanomix.com or 704.402.4373.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23036

A Learning Experience

When McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, set about constructing its new Engineering Technology Building, it used the latest state-of-the-art technology not only to achieve U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, but also to create a living laboratory to train students on the building systems of the future. One of the components is a rainwater harvesting system that collects, filters and disinfects rainwater for non-potable and potable use in the building.

Deck: 

First-of-its-kind system treats rainwater for potable reuse

About The Author: 

Rick VanSant is president and CEO of UV Pure Technologies. VanSant can be reached at rvansant@uvpure.com or 416.208.9884.

Publication Date: 
September 22, 2011
Activation Date: 
September 22, 2011
Company Reference: 
Issue Reference: 
Legacy
Legacy ID: 
23035

Greywater Recycling

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Legacy ID: 
60243
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March 2011

The Equaris Enfinity Plus greywater recycling system filters, disinfects with ozone and supplies reverse osmosis water to every plumbing fixture, including drinking water. Milking as much permeate water as possible out of the concentrate and using the high-TDS water to flush the toilets has documented a 99% reduction in the need for water by totally recycling the greywater.

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