Don’t Drink, Pathogens Inside

By:

Kate Cline

In honor of Halloween, this blog is taking a turn for the creepy, inspired by AMC’s The Walking Dead (possible spoilers ahead!).

For those who are not familiar with the show, it follows a group of survivors trying to stay alive in the post-apocalyptic aftermath of a zombie plague. Not only does the group have to fight off flesh-eating zombies, they also have to find the basics: food, shelter, and, of course, clean drinking water.

In the current season, the group has sought refuge in an abandoned prison, where they are attempting to rebuild the rudiments of society, from farming to school for the children (granted, one of the lessons was “Killing Zombies With Knives 101”).

We also have seen a bit more about how the survivors obtain drinking water. They appear to have rain barrels stationed around the prison and have set up a system that pumps water from a nearby creek into storage barrels. They even have rigged up a hand-pumped shower system in the prison bathroom.

The survivors know just how important water is – in the most recent episode, one character risked her life to go out and fix the clogged pump when the water supply began running low. Another gave a passionate speech about the daily risks the survivors face: “You walk outside, you risk your life. You take a drink of water, you risk your life. Nowadays you breath and you risk your life,” he said.

With a flu-like disease now spreading through the prison, many fans of the show are speculating that it could be some type of waterborne illness that is making everyone sick. We have yet to find out the true cause of the sickness, or if there will be a cure, but if it is something in the water – will the survivors be able to combat it with their limited resources? I suppose we will just have to tune in to find out!

In the spirit of Halloween, what would be your tips for the Walking Dead gang on achieving clean drinking water in a zombie apocalypse? Tell us in the comments below, or e-mail us at wqpeditor@sgcmail.com.

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