EPA Modifies Engine Replacement Rule

March 28, 2014

The rule allow the use of new exempt engines to replace failed engines in water well drilling rigs

EPA NGWA Engine Replacement Rule Modification Oil Rigs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) modified its final rules to allow the use of new exempt engines to replace failed engines in water well drilling rigs up to 40 years old. 

"The revised rule is a major improvement over EPA's previous proposal," said Denis Crayon, DOT-OSHA subcommittee chair for the National Ground Water Assn. (NGWA). 

EPA's initial proposal required that a new engine meeting current emission standards be used in the case of engine failure on water well drilling rigs older than 25 years. Depending on the make and model, there are physical and performance issues in bringing specialized water well drilling equipment up to Tier 4 engine standards. NGWA estimates that approximately 30% of water well drilling rigs would have had problems meeting EPA's initial proposal. 

The ability to use new exempt engines as a replacement for failing engines in rigs up to 40 years old allows the water well drilling industry to improve air quality while maintaining business operations.

A copy of the final rule is available by going to the Federal Register, Volume 79, page 7077. Industry members are advised to consult with applicable state rules, such as in California, for any additional state-level requirements.    

Source:

NGWA

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