UL Announces Alternative Certification Program for Lead-Free Verification of Plumbing Products

December 21, 2009

New program will test materials to demonstrate compliance to California Health and Safety Code and similar legislation

Underwriters Laboratories (UL), a provider of drinking water quality and safety standards, announced a new certification program aimed to help manufacturers of plumbing (and cooking)-related products demonstrate compliance with new, stricter low lead requirements that will be mandatory in California and Vermont starting Jan. 1, 2010.

California Assembly Bill 1953 (AB 1953), now a state law, was passed in order to update section 116875 of the California Health and Safety Code. The law requires no more than 0.2% lead by weight in solder and flux used in the installation or repair of any public water system or any residential or nonresidential facility that provides water for human consumption. AB 1953 also requires no more than a weighted average of 0.25% lead by weight when used with respect to the wetted surfaces of pipes and pipe fittings, plumbing fittings and fixtures.

UL’s new certification program will test materials to demonstrate compliance to both the California Health and Safety Code and similar legislation in Vermont. It will allow manufacturers that are required to demonstrate compliance with the California Health and Safety Code, but are not covered by or specifically included in Annex G of ANSI/NSF 61, to obtain the proper product safety certification.

“UL is giving manufacturers their first option of demonstrating compliance with new low lead laws using a means other than Annex G,” said Jeff Smith, general manager, UL Global Water Business. “We decided not to wait for Annex G to be updated or the creation of a new standard to offer our valued customers California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC)-recognized product validation. Now, manufacturers can quickly and efficiently navigate the compliance processes recognized by the DTSC and required by state law.”

Source:

Underwriters Laboratories

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