Oct 08, 2014

Considering Commercial

kate cline_water quality products

Last month, WQP staff attended the Water Quality Assn.’s (WQA) Mid-Year Leadership Conference in Williamsburg, Va. As always, the conference was an excellent chance to network with other water professionals and get updated on the industry (as well as get a taste of colonial America), but amongst all of the meetings and events, one keyword seemed to keep coming up: commercial.

When it comes to the commercial water treatment market, systems are many and varied, ranging from a simple softener setup to a whole-building approach encompassing drinking water, water reuse and water efficiency, and everything in between. 

The vast variation in commercial systems can make getting involved in this sector of the industry seem daunting — but it also means that the commercial market is full of opportunities.  

The Dealer Section meeting at Mid-Year put a heavy emphasis on commercial water treatment this year. Eric Yeggy of WQA shared the results of a survey the association conducted to gauge the membership’s interest in various sectors of the commercial market. The results revealed that 22% of those who took the survey believed that WQA should focus on restaurants first, followed by hospitals and clinics (19%), and hotels (19%). (Other choices on the survey included office buildings, schools, laundries, carwashes, breweries, high-purity laboratories and more — only re-emphasizing the wide variety of applications within the commercial market.)

The meeting concluded with two dealers sharing their experiences in the commercial market. Dennis Rupert of Rupert’s Culligan Water Conditioning shared his experiences with the dental industry, describing how a group of Michigan dealers collaborated to exhibit at a dentist’s conference, which resulted in new business. Kelly Johnson of Quality Water Services described several of the commercial projects his company has been involved in, including a jail, a truck stop and more.

The bottom line in the commercial water treatment market is that there are many avenues through which you can get your business involved. Each company may find that a certain mix of residential and commercial clients — and then, possibly only specific applications of commercial systems—works best for its experience and expertise.

What types of commercial applications does your company work with? What sectors of the commercial market would you like to learn more about? We would love to hear from you — e-mail us at [email protected] to tell us your thoughts.

New Look, New Size

When the next issue of WQP arrives in your mailbox, you’ll notice that we’ve made some changes. We are excited to announce that not only will WQP have an updated, modern design, it also will be a new size — smaller than the current format, but larger than a standard size magazine. The new size and look will allow us to continue bringing you the same quality content in a modern, easy-to-read, easy-to-share format. 

We welcome any questions or comments you may have — e-mail us at [email protected].

About the author

Kate Cline is managing editor of Water Quality Products. Cline can be reached at [email protected] or 847.391.1007.

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