Nov 28, 2019

Cape Town, South Africa, Dam Levels Drop as Water Consumption Steadily Increases

In the aftermath of Day Zero, Cape Town, South Africa, dam levels are at an overall storage capacity of 83.1%, while the city’s water consumption levels steadily increase.

Cape Town dam levels have dropped by 0.6% and are currently at an overall storage capacity of 83.1%, while the city’s water consumption levels are steadily increasing.

Cape Town, South Africa, dam levels have dropped by 0.6% and are currently at an overall storage capacity of 83.1%, while the city’s water consumption levels are steadily increasing.

Though Day Zero has passed and the city’s rainfall this past winter was below average for the fifth consecutive year, water saving methods are still essential, according to Cape Town ETC.

“Although these recent increases to water consumption are not yet of significant concern to the city, we can’t be certain of the rainfall in the current and next hydrological year and those thereafter,” said the city’s Mayoral Committee Member for Water and Waste, Alderman Xanthea Limberg. “We need to continue with our water-wise habits and remain mindful of our consumption.” 

In 2018, the city indicated that water users can expect to see a considerable reduction in the cost of water to be reflected in their municipal invoices, but that has not happened, reported Cape Talk.

The city created a water page which provided up to date content about dam levels in an effort to mitigate the issue. Cape Town also targeted high water consumers and sent out water notices, according to eNCA. Failure to reduce water consumption spurred the installation of water demand management devices to restrict the supply.

“We went all the way from level 6b water restrictions and level 6b tariffs all the way down to level 3. In July we implemented the new level 1 restriction and level 1 tariffs,” said Limberg.

Warmer months are on the horizon for Cape Town, meaning consumption is expected to increase even more. Residents are reminded to remain conscious of their water usage.

“Over the current hydrological year (which started from Nov. 1 to Oct. 31), residents should please keep an eye out for updates to restriction levels and respond appropriately if the city announces it is necessary to reduce water use,” added Limberg.

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