Dec 06, 2021

EPA Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding by State

Overview of the funding provided for water

water

The U.S. House of Representatives has joined the U.S. Senate in passing The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal. 

The passage of this bill has unlocked billions of dollars to address climate change, and is the single largest investment in water that the federal government has ever made. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law provides more than $50 billion to EPA to improve the nation’s drinking water, wastewater, and storm water infrastructure.

“With President Biden’s leadership and congressional action, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has created a historic opportunity to correct long standing environmental and economic injustices across America,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan in a press release. “As leaders, we must seize this moment. Billions of dollars are about to start flowing to states and it is critical that EPA partners with states, Tribes, and territories to ensure the benefits of these investments are delivered in the most equitable way.”

This funding is provided through EPA’s State Revolving Fund (SRF) programs and according to EPA will: create jobs; upgrade America’s aging water infrastructure; and address lead in drinking water and per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination.

EPA will allocate $7.4 billion to states, Tribes, and territories for 2022, and nearly half of the funding is available as grants or principal forgiveness loans. Additionally, the 2022 allocation is the first of five years of nearly $44 billion in SRF funding, which states will receive through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. 

EPA will then provide additional information on the impact of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal, which includes how resources will be directed and accessed.

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Water Infrastructure Funding By State

Alaska

  • Over $65 million.

American Samoa

  • $30,885,000.

Arizona

  • $109,458,000

Arkansas:   

  • $93,252,000

California

  • $609,441,000.

Colorado

  • $121,347,000.  

D.C.

  • $63,041,000 for water infrastructure improvements.
  • $886,000 for canopies to reduce harmful runoff from municipal trucks.

Guam

  • $26,522,000.

Hawaii

  • $68,398,000.

Idaho 

  • Over $63 million.

Iowa

  • $110,745,000.

Louisiana       

  • $101,243,000.

Maryland

  • $ $144,181,000.

Massachusetts

  • $188,890,000.

Mississippi

  •  $74,899,000.

Missouri

  • $147,152,000.

Montana

  • $63,041,000.

Nebraska

  • $63,430,000.

Nevada

  • $71,601,000.

New Jersey

  • $168,949,000.

New Mexico  

  • $63,041,000.

New York

  • $428,072,000.

North Dakota

  • $63,041,000.  

Northern Marianas

  •  $20,794,000.

Oklahoma

  • $91,488,000/

Oregon

  • Over $92 million.

Pennsylvania

  • $240,381,000.

South Dakota

  • $63,041,000.

Texas        

  • $507,672,000

Utah

  • $63,721,000.

Vermont 

  • $63,041,000.

Virginia

  • $126.4 million in water infrastructure funding.
  • West Virginia: $83,211,000.

Washington

  • Over $152 million 

Wyoming

  • $63,041,000.
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Governors & EPA Regional Administrator Comments

“Urban storm water is a significant source of water pollution and can be a serious public health concern,” said EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “This funding will support the District of Columbia’s efforts to help prevent pollutants from draining from public works vehicles into local waterways.”

“EPA is committed to making the most of this historic opportunity to help communities invest in the critical infrastructure that will deliver clean water and safe drinking water for decades to come,” said EPA Regional Administrator KC Becker. “In addition to creating jobs across our states, these funds will improve the health of our watersheds and expand access to safe drinking water for homes, businesses, schools, and childcare centers; including the disadvantaged communities who need it most.”  

“In Region 7, half of our communities with a water or sewer utility have less than 425 people – and many of these populations are shrinking,” said Acting EPA Region 7 Administrator Edward H. Chu. “This historic investment will allow us to continue supporting the immediate needs of the aging water and wastewater systems in these and other underserved areas.”

“EPA is committed to making the most of this historic opportunity to help communities invest in the critical infrastructure that will deliver clean water and safe drinking water for decades to come,” said EPA Regional Administrator KC Becker. “In addition to creating jobs across our states, these funds will improve the health of our watersheds and expand access to safe drinking water for homes, businesses, schools, and childcare centers; including the disadvantaged communities who need it most.”  

“Water infrastructure needs are a top concern across the Pacific Southwest,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Acting Regional Administrator Deborah Jordan. “We look forward to partnering with Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the U.S. Pacific Territories in their work to ensure that important infrastructure investments are made to meet the water quality and public health goals, particularly in disadvantaged communities throughout the states.”

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