Apr 30, 2015

McEllhiney Distinguished Lecturer to Focus on Groundwater Treatment Options

The presentation will identify classes of treatment technologies and detail specific technology choices as a function of contaminant reduction efficacy and cost

Peter S. Cartwright 2016 McEllhiney Distinguished Lecturer

Peter S. Cartwright, P.E., named the 2016 McEllhiney Distinguished Lecturer, will present “Water Well Contaminants and Treatment Options,” the National Ground Water Research and Educational Foundation announced.

Cartwright, who owns and operates Cartwright Consulting Co. with offices in Minneapolis and the Netherlands, has been in the treatment side of the water industry since 1974.

The context for Cartwright’s lecture is that no two water supplies are identical, so ensuring a potable water supply that is safe, good tasting and acceptable for washing, bathing or showering requires a treatment approach that takes into account the unique variables that affect water quality.

Health-related contaminants such as nitrite/nitrate, arsenic and pathogenic microorganisms may be naturally occurring or the result of human activity, or both. Also, the water pH, total dissolved solids, iron, hardness and other constituents may affect taste or its other properties. The challenge to the groundwater professional is how to reduce such constituents to an acceptable level.

Cartwright’s presentation will identify classes of treatment technologies and detail specific technology choices as a function of contaminant reduction efficacy and cost. He also will address the installation requirements, operation, and maintenance of treatment systems.

The lecture will be tailored to the contaminants that a given audience encounters most frequently or the treatment technologies in which the audience is most interested.

Named in honor of the founding president of the National Ground Water Assn., the William A. McEllhiney Distinguished Lecture Series in Water Well Technology is made possible by a grant from Franklin Electric.

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