May 20, 2020

Michigan City Detects Low Levels of PFAS

Testing of Portage, Michigan’s municipal water showed a low level of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in one of the city’s wells

pfas contamination

Quarterly testing of Portage, Michigan’s municipal water showed a low level of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in one of the city’s wells, according to Booth Newspapers. 

2020 first quarter testing results show samples from a Portage municipal well tested at 16 parts per trillion (ppt) for PFAS, reported a news release from the city. According to Booth Newspapers, another well tested at 2 ppt in 2018.

Since the state discovered the well tested at 13 ppt in 2018, it began regularly testing the well ever since. The quarterly results are 16 ppt, which are below the U.S. EPA lifetime health advisory levels of 70 ppt.

Portage has been testing its water supply as part of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, reported City Manager Joe La Margo. The state only continuously tests wells that tested over 10 ppt, added La Margo.

In the first three quarters of 2019, the well tested at 13 ppt for PFAS, reported Booth Newspapers. In the final quarter, results showed PFAS levels at 14 ppt. 

“The city of Portage is responsible for providing clean, safe drinking water to its residents,” said La Margo. “The quarterly testing by the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) gives us confidence that we are doing just that.”

All of the contaminants found in the first-quarter testing were perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). 

Results of 25 private wells near a former landfill released in February, where PFAS was discovered in May 2019, had some levels of PFAS between 11 ppt and 58 ppt, added Booth Newspapers.

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