Jun 12, 2015

WCSA Achieves Drinking Water Compliance

The drinking water meets or exceeds all state and federal requirements for quality, reporting and monitoring

Washington County Service Authority drinking water

The Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) in Abingdon, Va., recently published its annual Drinking Water Quality Report (also known as a Consumer Confidence Report) for 2014, which revealed that drinking water provided by the authority meets or exceeds all state and federal requirements for quality, reporting and monitoring.

The report is designed to inform WCSA customers about the quality of their drinking water and the authority's efforts to protect its water supply. In addition, the report explains where WCSA’s water comes from, what it contains and the specific sampling and treatment processes performed by the authority to prevent health risks.

“One of our goals is to provide exceptional water service at a reasonable cost,” said Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This report verifies that WCSA continues to deliver a safe, top-quality product for Washington County businesses and residents.”

WCSA draws its water from several sources, including the Middle Fork of the Holston River; the South Fork of the Holston River; the Cole, Widener and Jones springs at Mill Creek; and Reservation Spring in Taylors Valley. An additional groundwater source is purchased from the town of Saltville for customers near Hayters Gap.

Water from the Middle and South forks is treated at the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant, while water from the Cole, Widener and Jones springs is treated at the Mill Creek Drinking Water Plant. Reservation Spring does not require a treatment process, only the addition of chlorine and fluoride. These sources and facilities have a combined capacity to treat more than 15 million gal of water per day. On average, WCSA performs 150 bacterial tests per month on its water treatment system.

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